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Whatever Happened To Mcewans Lager?


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Grunhalle was where it was at in 1970's Britain. Sadly, I was too young to find out if that really was the case. :(

Do you remember Colt 45???

colt451.jpg

There was still a pub in Leven that sold that on Draft during my formative under-age drinking experience!!! (The Golf for those that know it)!!!

It got you pissed!!!

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Lager is generally shite anyway and should only be drunk as a last resort.

Lagering is a noble brewing style originating from Germany. In fact the word lager has been lifted from the German language (it means to store).

Traditionally, the beer is cold-conditioned in a cellar for six month to allow it to reach maturity. But the multi-national brewers who peddle the big lager brands do not follow this practice, resulting in an inferior product.

So there's nothing wrong with lager in itself, rather the way it's mass produced.

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Lagering is a noble brewing style originating from Germany. In fact the word lager has been lifted from the German language (it means to store).

Traditionally, the beer is cold-conditioned in a cellar for six month to allow it to reach maturity. But the multi-national brewers who peddle the big lager brands do not follow this practice, resulting in an inferior product.

So there's nothing wrong with lager in itself, rather the way it's mass produced.

It's still shit IMO. I'm just generally not a lager or beer fan, I still prefer the jakey goodness of cider.

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Lagering is a noble brewing style originating from Germany. In fact the word lager has been lifted from the German language (it means to store).

Traditionally, the beer is cold-conditioned in a cellar for six month to allow it to reach maturity. But the multi-national brewers who peddle the big lager brands do not follow this practice, resulting in an inferior product.

So there's nothing wrong with lager in itself, rather the way it's mass produced.

Learn something new everyday.

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Lagering is a noble brewing style originating from Germany. In fact the word lager has been lifted from the German language (it means to store).

Traditionally, the beer is cold-conditioned in a cellar for six month to allow it to reach maturity. But the multi-national brewers who peddle the big lager brands do not follow this practice, resulting in an inferior product.

So there's nothing wrong with lager in itself, rather the way it's mass produced.

Learn something new everyday.

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Lagering is a noble brewing style originating from Germany. In fact the word lager has been lifted from the German language (it means to store).

Traditionally, the beer is cold-conditioned in a cellar for six month to allow it to reach maturity. But the multi-national brewers who peddle the big lager brands do not follow this practice, resulting in an inferior product.

So there's nothing wrong with lager in itself, rather the way it's mass produced.

Learn something new everyday.

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McEwan's is an awful lager. With the growth in popularity of foreign lagers, which are far superior to McEwan's or Tennents, it's only natural that they've declined in popularity. I think Tennents have tried to combat this a bit with the introduction of Tennents Cold, but that's quite gash as well.

A pint of Tennents cost my mate £2.39 in one of the dankiest pubs in Falkirk (gotta love it though :) ) the weekend before last. For roughly the same price, a foreign lager could have been gotten, and for only about 20p more he could have got a premium.

The forgeign or generic lagers as we call them are all made in the uk under licence.

We held a taste test the other week and after a couple(2) pints nobody could tell the difference between a pint of Stella, a pint of Miller, A Heineken and a pint of Tennets!

Try it you struggle to notice any difference between the.

We excluded Carling from the test as its pish water!

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The forgeign or generic lagers as we call them are all made in the uk under licence.

We held a taste test the other week and after a couple(2) pints nobody could tell the difference between a pint of Stella, a pint of Miller, A Heineken and a pint of Tennets!

Try it you struggle to notice any difference between the.

We excluded Carling from the test as its pish water!

I would rather have Carling than any of the ones you included. Becks on draught is decent. Five or six of them bad boys and you know about it!!

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The forgeign or generic lagers as we call them are all made in the uk under licence.

We held a taste test the other week and after a couple(2) pints nobody could tell the difference between a pint of Stella, a pint of Miller, A Heineken and a pint of Tennets!

The global drinks industry is all about advertising muscle and a trendy image. Intrinsically, there's not a great deal of difference between the beers you mention.

As you say, they are brewed under licence in the UK in a fashion that minimises production costs and maximises profits.

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Lagering is a noble brewing style originating from Germany. In fact the word lager has been lifted from the German language (it means to store).

Traditionally, the beer is cold-conditioned in a cellar for six month to allow it to reach maturity. But the multi-national brewers who peddle the big lager brands do not follow this practice, resulting in an inferior product.

So there's nothing wrong with lager in itself, rather the way it's mass produced.

Like your post, considering you typed this earlier on ;)

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To the guy who asked about Kestrel: no, you don't get it anymore. Check out this article, I saw it a couple of years ago and it says a lot:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3188382.stm

Apparently Kestrel Super is still available, though!

Cheers for the article. An interesting read.

I totally forgot about the watery slaver that is Skol. One of my uncles is quite poor (but he's a very nice guy and that's all that matters) so whenever he came round to ours for a drink his gift for the occassion was always a 12 pack of Skol. My dad, a dye in the wool Tennents man, used to then fob it off to me when I was about 14 or 15 knowing that I was at that age when drinking alcohol was extremely appealing yet also knowing fine well that 5 or 6 tins of Skol wouldn't cause any harm. I actually think I deserve a pat on the back for managing to polish off a few of those tame tins because they were not pleasant at all.

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I seem to remember a tinned lager by the name of Hampden Lager, again from about the 70's. No idea what it tasted like, but I assume it would have been cheap and nasty.

I remember that. In a sort of blue and white striped can?

It was rotten, but then I'd be 14 so I might have thought it was a good idea. :lol:

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