Jump to content

Petty Things That Get On Your Nerves...


Recommended Posts

22 minutes ago, The Moonster said:

I'm sure this will have been mentioned in here before but I've just seen an advert for a barber shop called BRBR and it set a fire within me. Who started this braindead notion of removing vowels from a standard word for a "cool" business name? Not only do I hope these businesses fail but if there is anything I can do to accelerate that process I will now be actioning it. I believe this barber shop is in Inverclyde so I call on the P&B masses to bully them out of existence. 

Abrdn-and-Absrd.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, The Moonster said:

I'm sure this will have been mentioned in here before but I've just seen an advert for a barber shop called BRBR and it set a fire within me. Who started this braindead notion of removing vowels from a standard word for a "cool" business name? Not only do I hope these businesses fail but if there is anything I can do to accelerate that process I will now be actioning it. I believe this barber shop is in Inverclyde so I call on the P&B masses to bully them out of existence. 

Maybe the owner is Czech?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, scottsdad said:

"By the laws of maths, half of people will pay more than the average."

This statement is incorrect.

I may be outting myself as an idiot here but... is it?

If you have 4 people paying £500, £6,000, £6,500, and £7,000 a year (obviously extreme examples) the average is £5,000. However more than half of these 4 people will be paying more than the average.

Is that not what this sentence means? I'm not commenting on whether it's accurate, just that it seems possible.

Edited by Beans on Toast
Grammar. Numbers are right... I think.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, scottsdad said:

From the Guardian

Where do you even start with this nonsense?

The Guardian replies..

Quote

UPDATE: Thank you to all the readers who queried the statement: “By the laws of maths, half of people will pay more than the average.” You are right to say that that is not accurate if you take average to mean mean (the total of all payments, divided by the number of people who pay). It is only technically accurate if you take average to mean median (the payment exactly at mid point between the highest and the lowest). I’m afraid I was using the word in a general sense, to try to make a point with some force and clarity.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Beans on Toast said:

Well I'm glad some idiot didn't spent 10mins with calculator, an abacus and a notebook trying to suggest otherwise.

I was going to suggest that he was wrong because far more people live in pokey flats than big houses, but I was scared to in case that's got nothing to do with it and everyone would laugh at me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Beans on Toast said:

I may be outting myself as an idiot here but... is it?

If you have 4 people paying £500, £6,000, £6,500, and £7,000 a year (obviously extreme examples) the average is £5,000. However more than half of these 4 people will be paying more than the average.

Is that not what this sentence means? I'm not commenting on whether it's accurate, just that it seems possible.

As your example shows, more than half in that case pay more than the average. The Guardian sentence stated that "by the laws of maths" half of people would pay more than the average.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, scottsdad said:

As your example shows, more than half in that case pay more than the average. The Guardian sentence stated that "by the laws of maths" half of people would pay more than the average.

 

Ah I see, I did not focus on that part of the sentence, but you are correct then.

I humbly offer my apologies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites



Are you having a Porto Bellow?
 
 
Well, there ain't no surf in it.


And there's not mush room either.

Who started this braindead notion of removing vowels from a standard word for a "cool" business name?

People who wanted their business to be easily searchable. I'm crtnly not a fan, but it makes sense.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, DiegoDiego said:


 

 


And there's not mush room either.


People who wanted their business to be easily searchable. I'm crtnly not a fan, but it makes sense.

 

Nearly as bad as the plumbers etc in Yellow Pages (look it up, kids) who stick their adverts in as:

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMageePlumbingLtd

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, The Moonster said:

I'm sure this will have been mentioned in here before but I've just seen an advert for a barber shop called BRBR and it set a fire within me. Who started this braindead notion of removing vowels from a standard word for a "cool" business name? Not only do I hope these businesses fail but if there is anything I can do to accelerate that process I will now be actioning it. I believe this barber shop is in Inverclyde so I call on the P&B masses to bully them out of existence. 

one for auld cnts but I would have thought a shop called BRBR would sell antique phones. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...