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The Official ‘Hi-Risk Anus PM’ Clusterfuck Thread


Granny Danger

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14 hours ago, oaksoft said:

It's fascinating that at the same time as you're a contributing part of the problem as to why the NHS has issues, you are also criticising that same NHS for being broken.

That's like dumping your litter in the street and then complaining about all the litter in your area.

I think he's just trolling because he knows it'll get a few bites. Sad as f**k, but here we are. 

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17 hours ago, jakedee said:

Absolute garbage. When I was working I would have been dismissed instantly if i was found to be doing work for a competitor, or even if doing similar work in my own time.
NHS trained staff should not be "moonlighting" for other private companies.

I work for the NHS, 40 hours per week with 1:6 on-call. Why am I not allowed to do some private work (or any other work) in my own time? Do I have an obligation to provide more hours to the NHS than the full-time hours I already provide? Not that I do any private work, but why should an employer be allowed to specify what you do in your own time so long as it isn't interfering with your employment?

Edited by Cyclizine
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Andrew Bailie, the Governor of the Bank of England, has confirmed that the UK economy was just “hours from meltdown” following Kwarteng’s disastrous mini-budget. Someone like Bailie does not use language like that without thought.

Despite this there has been no admittance of liability nor any apology from Kwarteng, from Truss or from Sunak.

No one in the Tory government, past or present, is willing to own up to the clusterfuck and it’s ongoing effects, rather they are going to try to airbrush it out.

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I work for the NHS, 40 hours per week with 1:6 on-call. Why am I not allowed to do some private work (or any other work) in my own time? Do I have an obligation to provide more hours to the NHS than the full-time hours I already provide? Not that I do any private work, but why should an employer be allowed to specify what you do in your own time so long as it isn't interfering with your employment?
If your employer has funded your training, why should they allow you to work for a competitor?
Many companies insist, that for x amount of time, if you leave you reimburse a proportion of your training costs.
Why should the NHS be any different?
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15 minutes ago, jakedee said:

If your employer has funded your training, why should they allow you to work for a competitor?
Many companies insist, that for x amount of time, if you leave you reimburse a proportion of your training costs.
Why should the NHS be any different?

Notwithstanding the fact I've worked for the NHS for over sixteen years, I'd be intrigued how much "training" you think the NHS gives its staff in reality and how you think it's delivered. Plus I am working full time. I've not left the NHS to work elsewhere, even if that were relevant.

Edited by Cyclizine
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2 hours ago, Granny Danger said:

Andrew Bailie, the Governor of the Bank of England, has confirmed that the UK economy was just “hours from meltdown” following Kwarteng’s disastrous mini-budget. Someone like Bailie does not use language like that without thought.

Just what the country needed according to some analysis on here. Also fully backed by D Ross esq - "SNP must follow" etc etc. Dangerous c***s the lot of them. 

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Notwithstanding the fact I've worked for the NHS for over sixteen years, I'd be intrigued how much "training" you think the NHS gives its staff in reality and how you think it's delivered. Plus I am working full time. I've not left the NHS to work elsewhere, even if that were relevant.
So... you just walk off the street and become a doctor, nurse, anesthetist etc.
This costs the NHS nothing?
I see no problem in an employer stipulating (as I mentioned before,it happens in many other industries) that your skills should be used only for your employer. If you decide after training,that that is not for you(before x amount of time)then the employer has the right to claw back some of the training costs.
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29 minutes ago, jakedee said:

So... you just walk off the street and become a doctor, nurse, anesthetist etc.
This costs the NHS nothing?
I see no problem in an employer stipulating (as I mentioned before,it happens in many other industries) that your skills should be used only for your employer. If you decide after training,that that is not for you(before x amount of time)then the employer has the right to claw back some of the training costs.

You don't just walk off the street. Nurses do a nursing degree, doctors go to medical school, then have a mandatory year of pre-registration in an approved setting. After that, they have full registration and coukd work anywhere that will employ them, most will complete a second year minimum. It's not indentured servitude.

Doctors who are "training" in a specialty are not just supernumerary. They're providing a huge amount service to the NHS as well, far beyond what any notional "training" costs would be. Arguably, they should try to claw back money from the NHS for all the unpaid extra hours they work. I've probably paid several thousand, if not more, for all my exams, training courses, meetings etc (plus all the needed travel and accommodation), all mandatory, but the NHS doesn't cover them, I don't "owe" them the money back, since they never paid it in the first place.

I have more than fulfilled my "duty" to the NHS, even if that were a thing. I meet my contractual obligations, I work full time, what I do in my free time has nothing to do with the NHS.

Also, anaesthetists are doctors.

Edited by Cyclizine
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3 hours ago, Cyclizine said:

I work for the NHS, 40 hours per week with 1:6 on-call. Why am I not allowed to do some private work (or any other work) in my own time? Do I have an obligation to provide more hours to the NHS than the full-time hours I already provide? Not that I do any private work, but why should an employer be allowed to specify what you do in your own time so long as it isn't interfering with your employment?

More power to you, I think you absolutely should be allowed to do private work if you need to. Given the disastrous changes to doctors pensions the NHS shot itself in the foot in chasing doctors away from out of hours etc and into the private sector. 

43 minutes ago, jakedee said:

So... you just walk off the street and become a doctor, nurse, anesthetist etc.
This costs the NHS nothing?
I see no problem in an employer stipulating (as I mentioned before,it happens in many other industries) that your skills should be used only for your employer. If you decide after training,that that is not for you(before x amount of time)then the employer has the right to claw back some of the training costs.

But the NHS also gets cheaper labour, covering the horrible hours in Hospitals at quite a cheap rate with junior doctors etc. Some private work can be involved with clinical trials or charitable endeavours too, should that stop? Any doctor which has reached the end of their speciality training (and indeed through it) should be allowed to top up their income. Junior doctors get incredibly poor wages, yes some consultants get decent money but not every specialty does, why shouldnt they be able to work a saturday morning at Rosshall doing joint injections or doing travel injection clinics etc?

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Junior doctors get incredibly poor wages, yes some consultants get decent money but not every specialty does, why shouldnt they be able to work a saturday morning at Rosshall doing joint injections or doing travel injection clinics etc?


For the same reason a council employed plumber can't fit a tap for company x on a Saturday morning.
Or an RAF aircraft engineer can't take a week off and "moonlight" for airbus for that week.
Why should employees for the NHS be any different?
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16 minutes ago, jakedee said:


 

 


For the same reason a council employed plumber can't fit a tap for company x on a Saturday morning.
Or an RAF aircraft engineer can't take a week off and "moonlight" for airbus for that week.
Why should employees for the NHS be any different?

 

Ive never met a plumber who didnt do homers? 
I dont think Airbus take on weekend casual workers?

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52 minutes ago, jakedee said:

For the same reason a council employed plumber can't fit a tap for company x on a Saturday morning.

Or an RAF aircraft engineer can't take a week off and "moonlight" for airbus for that week.
Why should employees for the NHS be any different?

 

Why is an NHS worker doing other work in their own time a problem? Are you suggesting that they can only do more hours for the NHS? That will do wonders for recruitment and retention. Bank pay rates are atrocious and completely out of keeping with market rates. What NHS employees do in their own time is none of the NHS's business, so long as it doesn't impact their NHS work.

I have no obligation to do any more work than is specified in my contract and job plan. If they want me to do more work, then they can pay me for it. I don't currently do private work, but I do also work for a university one day a week (and I am paid for it). I have colleagues who do event and sports cover or do expedition medicine. Should all this be banned as well? Where do you draw the line?

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1 hour ago, jakedee said:
1 hour ago, Inanimate Carbon Rod said:
Ive never met a plumber who didnt do homers? 
I dont think Airbus take on weekend casual workers?

I don't think doing "homers" is the same as being employed by another company to carry out work.

Yes it is, its additional work. Ive already explained that my wife had to stop doing out of hours GP shifts because of the pension reforms essentially meaning that doing more NHS work ends up costing Doctors in the long run. If she put in to do a nightshift on a saturday that was rated at say £400 she’d basically be working for free after tax and the knock on impact on her pension. She doesnt currently do any private work but was asked to be a lecturer at a Uni and had been asked about doing a private clinic out of hours, some of her colleagues want to do this, but to us time off is precious so she wont, but ultimately if others want to do it then why shouldnt they? 

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1 hour ago, jakedee said:
1 hour ago, Inanimate Carbon Rod said:
Ive never met a plumber who didnt do homers? 
I dont think Airbus take on weekend casual workers?

I don't think doing "homers" is the same as being employed by another company to carry out work.

The NHS is not a private company, their motivation is not profit.

Consultants hold all the power here as there are so few of them. Hospitals always have vacancies for consultants, if they were to be banned from private work some of them would leave the NHS and you are in a worse situation

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