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Cost of Living Crisis


Paco

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On 07/09/2022 at 10:23, BFTD said:

Probably just the most successful ones.

Sadly probably true. 

23 hours ago, oneteaminglasgow said:

The act of being a landlord at all is exploitation in and of itself. Being a c**t about it too is just an added extra. 

I just dont think your first sentence is true. There are some people out there who are happy to rent (either through choice or requirement). As long as the landlord is charging a fair rent and is sorting out any issues ASAP (at their own cost) then its an agreement that can work. 

21 hours ago, Father Ted said:

Even my dog knows that windfall taxes on energy producers is the only way to go.

But we all know how much this goes against the hated Tory ethos.

Watch Truss and her merry band of f*ckwits make a complete arse of it and rob the public purse yet again to deprive society of vital services, etc, in the name of private profiteering.

I hate this scum with every fibre of my being.

The issue with the initial windfall tax is that is can basically be avoided by investing in green tech. Which is something they need to do anyways. People will argue that it may mean they dont invest in green tech in the north sea, however, Norway implemented large additional taxes on all their oil fields and companies still invested. 

Very simply, these large profits are one off amounts and are being made by exploiting a lot of people so it is only fair that they should have to pay extra. 

3 hours ago, Day of the Lords said:

Even with whatever help Truss provides, it's probably going to be nowhere near enough - I heard rumours at work yesterday that several privately owned Care Homes in the area will be closing their doors this winter as they simply can't afford the heating costs. They've been contacting local authorities asking if they can take their residents. Some of the smaller area Councils are facing heating bill increases of £2-3million in the coming months, which is utterly mental. I suspect most of the pubs in rural places like Forfar and Kirriemuir aren't going to survive either with various other small businesses closing their doors. 

However bad we think it's probably going to be over winter, in reality it'll probably be orders of magnitude worse. 

I dont even think it will just be rural pubs that struggle. It is a chain of events as people are squeezed via their personal energy costs, interest rates and other inflationary costs. The likes of pubs etc will be one of the first to suffer

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2 hours ago, Aufc said:

The issue with the initial windfall tax is that is can basically be avoided by investing in green tech. Which is something they need to do anyways. People will argue that it may mean they dont invest in green tech in the north sea, however, Norway implemented large additional taxes on all their oil fields and companies still invested. 

Very simply, these large profits are one off amounts and are being made by exploiting a lot of people so it is only fair that they should have to pay extra. 

Gimpy Sunak and his get out clauses. Tories will never tax their pals, as they are up to their eyeballs in corrupt practices.

Norway have the right idea, we can only dream of having such a principled government for the people.

Having said that Norway are coining it in on a massive scale due to the farce that it is the British energy market.

 

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I use a fair amount of wild bird food for the garden birds. I normally buy a couple of big bags in my local garden centre. and for long enough it cost £30 for the two bags. In June I paid £40 for the same two bag. Fair enough I thought as I know things had got more expensive. I went to get more today and it was going to cost £52 for the same stuff. So in the space of 3 or 4 months the cost has went up almost 75%.

I used to buy the food in the garden centre to support local businesses, even though I knew I could get it online or in places like B&M for a couple of pounds less. But the price difference between local and online is getting to the stage where I think I need to shop online instead. I know I should shop local as much as possible, but ultimately I'm not a charity and need to think of my own finances first and foremost.

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I use a fair amount of wild bird food for the garden birds. I normally buy a couple of big bags in my local garden centre. and for long enough it cost £30 for the two bags. In June I paid £40 for the same two bag. Fair enough I thought as I know things had got more expensive. I went to get more today and it was going to cost £52 for the same stuff. So in the space of 3 or 4 months the cost has went up almost 75%.
I used to buy the food in the garden centre to support local businesses, even though I knew I could get it online or in places like B&M for a couple of pounds less. But the price difference between local and online is getting to the stage where I think I need to shop online instead. I know I should shop local as much as possible, but ultimately I'm not a charity and need to think of my own finances first and foremost.
Bird seed (the large bags) in Home Bargains has risen from £3.99 to £5.99 since I last bought it about 2 months ago.
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46 minutes ago, jakedee said:

Bird seed (the large bags) in Home Bargains has risen from £3.99 to £5.99 since I last bought it about 2 months ago.

B&M's sunflower hearts went from £18 to £25. It's getting very expensive to help our feathered friends. I know in the scheme of things this is not important, but highlights the other things that are being hit by price rises.

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UK inflation: Milk, cheese and eggs push food price rises to 14-year high

Soaring milk, cheese and egg costs have pushed food inflation to its highest level for 14 years.

Food prices rose at their fastest pace since 2008 in the year to August as the war in Ukraine continued to help drive up prices at supermarket tills.

Falling petrol and diesel prices meant the overall inflation rate eased slightly but it remains near a 40-year high, official figures show.

Rising costs are eating into budgets, with prices rising further than wages.

Overall UK inflation, which measures the rate at which prices rise, eased for the first time in almost a year in August, slipping to 9.9% from July's 10.1%The figure was not as bad as feared but economists have warned the inflation rate is likely to continue to rise, noting that the cost of food, clothing and services - which include things such as shops and restaurant prices - were all continuing to rise sharply.

The Bank of England has warned inflation could top 13% this year, and is expected to keep raising interest rates to try and control it.

However, the government plan to try and prevent widespread hardship by limiting rises in household energy bills, is likely to mean inflation will now not rise as high as previously expected. 

"High inflation continues to drive Britain's cost-of-living crisis, but the outlook has brightening considerably over the past week," said Jack Leslie, senior economist at the Resolution Foundation. "The Energy Price Guarantee should prevent a second winter surge in prices."

"However, high inflation is set to be with us for some time, particularly for low-income who continue to be hit hardest by high prices."

Food prices have been going up around the world following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, which has been one of the factors pushing up prices at supermarket tills.

The war has disrupted supplies from the two countries, which are major exporters of goods such as sunflower oil, wheat, and fertiliser.

The easing in the inflation rate reflects some respite at the petrol pumps over summer.

The real question is whether we are now past the peak?

That would have been a ridiculous suggestion a week ago before the Energy Price Guarantee.

But that should take 4 to 6 percentage points off headline inflation in the coming months.

The problem is that other sources of inflation are still surging.

Food prices rose over the month of August, by the highest rate since 1995, driven by basics such as milk, cheese and eggs.

Services inflation, which captures rising wages in large parts of the economy, is still going up too.

And, of course, even at 9.9%, prices are rising much faster than wages, and much higher than the Bank of England's 2% target.

The Bank is still likely to raise interest rates repeatedly in the coming months.

So the expectation is that this is a dip, before further rises alongside the increase in energy bills next month.

However, the peak, when it comes, should be much closer to where we are now, perhaps 11 or 12%, than anticipated before the Prime Minister's energy guarantee.

Inflation is the pace at which prices are rising. For example, if a bottle of milk costs £1 and that rises by 5p compared with a year earlier, then milk inflation is 5%.

Central banks around the world, including the Bank of England, have been trying to get soaring inflation under control by hiking interest rates.

Raising rates is a way of controlling inflation, as it increases the cost of borrowing and encourages people to borrow and spend less. It also encourages people to save more.

The Bank had been widely expected to increase rates again on Thursday, but it postponed that decision following the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

The Monetary Policy Committee's decision will now be announced on 22 September.

Kitty Ussher, chief economist at the Institute of Directors said she still expected interest rates to go up when the Bank of England announces its latest decision.

"The fact that the falling headline rate is due to changes in the price of petrol and diesel, which is driven predominantly by the international price of oil rather than by domestic factors, means news is unlikely to alter expectations of a rise in interest rates," she said, noting the Bank would act to try and stem UK price rises, such as food and services.

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BBC News - Detail on promised energy help for firms delayed
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-62901391

It's almost as if the new PM made a glib statement re support for business as an afterthought with zero plan in place and they are now trying to put something together on the hoof !

No support until November won't be quick enough for thousands unfortunately.

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On 10/09/2022 at 17:51, jakedee said:

Bird seed (the large bags) in Home Bargains has risen from £3.99 to £5.99 since I last bought it about 2 months ago.

 

On 10/09/2022 at 18:40, Soapy FFC said:

B&M's sunflower hearts went from £18 to £25. It's getting very expensive to help our feathered friends. I know in the scheme of things this is not important, but highlights the other things that are being hit by price rises.

All birds (feathered variety) are Tories.  F*ck them.

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41 minutes ago, Billy Jean King said:

BBC News - Detail on promised energy help for firms delayed
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-62901391

It's almost as if the new PM made a glib statement re support for business as an afterthought with zero plan in place and they are now trying to put something together on the hoof !

No support until November won't be quick enough for thousands unfortunately.

TBF, she’s not had a lot of time to get much done with all this mourning going on.

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7 minutes ago, BFTD said:

f**k birds, but only the feathered variety.

And they say I'm a deviant.

It’s a concern that some folk would still use the term to describe females.  I was around at the time that this was common parlance but would never use the term in that way today unless heavily (and obviously) ironically.

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5 minutes ago, Granny Danger said:

It’s a concern that some folk would still use the term to describe females.  I was around at the time that this was common parlance but would never use the term in that way today unless heavily (and obviously) ironically.

It was acceptable in the (Eighteen) Eighties.

Edit: irony must be great for irredeemable auld farts. Every twenty years or so, folk who love blackface and kipper ties get to be part of the in crowd again.

Edited by BFTD
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5 minutes ago, BFTD said:

It was acceptable in the (Eighteen) Eighties.

There was no need to have derogatory terms for women then as they had no rights so that in itself was insult enough.

There are some religions where women today have the same status as they had then.

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7 minutes ago, Granny Danger said:

There was no need to have derogatory terms for women then as they had no rights so that in itself was insult enough.

There are some religions where women today have the same status as they had then.

Was "bird" a derogatory term for a woman? Is "hen"?

Go on, Granny. Give us your list of bad religions.

Spoiler

Personally, I thought there were far better punk bands coming out of America in the Eighties and Nineties.

 

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On 10/09/2022 at 18:40, Soapy FFC said:

B&M's sunflower hearts went from £18 to £25. It's getting very expensive to help our feathered friends. I know in the scheme of things this is not important, but highlights the other things that are being hit by price rises.

Is Ukraine not a major sunflower producer? Big part of the explanation there.

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3 hours ago, Clown Job said:

Kitty Ussher, chief economist at the Institute of Directors said she still expected interest rates to go up when the Bank of England announces its latest decision.

 

"The fact that the falling headline rate is due to changes in the price of petrol and diesel, which is driven predominantly by the international price of oil rather than by domestic factors, means news is unlikely to alter expectations of a rise in interest rates,"

This shows the utter idiocy of the BoE's policy atm.

The predominant driver of interest rates in general was/is the global price of fuel and energy.

Fuel fell, so interest rates fell slightly. When the EU support producers (and the UK Gov support businesses here) the interest rate will fall again.

The only purpose of interest rate rises is to prop the pound up against the dollar - they are completely irrelevant and ineffective against domestic (and even European wide) inflation on food and services.

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2 hours ago, BFTD said:

Was "bird" a derogatory term for a woman? Is "hen"?

Go on, Granny. Give us your list of bad religions.

  Reveal hidden contents

Personally, I thought there were far better punk bands coming out of America in the Eighties and Nineties.

 

They’re all bad, or certainly the ones that I know of, though I have a little sympathy for non theist quakers.

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