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COP26 Glasgow 31st OCT to 12th NOV


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1 hour ago, ICTChris said:

Is there going to be loads of rioting and violence at this? 

Nah. Some token protests and maybe like one politician gets harassed and everyone spends a week doxxing the protestor.

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Alternatively we could be looking a reducing our energy demand for things like home heating. If you watch 'Grand Designs' on C4, then frequently you see houses that are so energy efficient that they need hardly any additional heating to keep warm. Whilst this type of house would not be practical for most, there must be more we can do to move all houses further towards that ideal situation than what we currently have. We shouldn't just be looking at how we produce or get more energy to burn, we need to also invest the same effort into using the existing energy more efficiently, especially given the UK's reliance on imported energy.

It would be the easiest thing in the world for the UK Government to mandate either very good insulation or heat pumps/electric power only in new build houses/flats. It would’ve been the easiest thing in the world to do years ago, frankly. They haven’t, and nor do they show any sign of intending to.

An individual with a bit of cash can convert their own home, no doubt about that. What in the name of f**k do you in a block of 40 flats set up to receive heat from gas-fired boilers?
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Likely not but, as always seems to happen at these events, you get the more extreme anti-capitalist, anti-globalist left wingers/anarchists who attach themselves to the protests.
And Glasgow does seem to have its contingent of union jack worshipping, statue saving borderline facists who wont pass up an opportunity to scrap with anyone who appears to be slightly to the left of Nigel Farage.
It doesn't matter what protest there is you will always have the renta-an-anarchist types there looking for a scrap with the polis.
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15 hours ago, jakedee said:

That's electricity demand and not energy demand. The big problem right now is we don't have a realistic alternative to gas boilers.

Plus there is a difference between average renewable supply and consistent renewable supply. In many times of the year we can't rely on wind and we can't use storage. So we have to use fossil fuels to make up that gap.

What we should be doing is copying what the French did in the 70s/80s. They went from 0% nuclear to 80% in 20 years.

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That's electricity demand and not energy demand. The big problem right now is we don't have a realistic alternative to gas boilers.
Plus there is a difference between average renewable supply and consistent renewable supply. In many times of the year we can't rely on wind and we can't use storage. So we have to use fossil fuels to make up that gap.
What we should be doing is copying what the French did in the 70s/80s. They went from 0% nuclear to 80% in 20 years.
There is an alternative to gas, as mentioned above, heat source pumps should have been mandatory in all new builds for the last 10 years,at least. Govt initiatives for insulation the same.If you want parts of the country that have to be maintained, but not productive for more than 300 years, then yes,nuclear is the way to go.
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Just now, jakedee said:
3 hours ago, DMCs said:
That's electricity demand and not energy demand. The big problem right now is we don't have a realistic alternative to gas boilers.
Plus there is a difference between average renewable supply and consistent renewable supply. In many times of the year we can't rely on wind and we can't use storage. So we have to use fossil fuels to make up that gap.
What we should be doing is copying what the French did in the 70s/80s. They went from 0% nuclear to 80% in 20 years.

There is an alternative to gas, as mentioned above, heat source pumps should have been mandatory in all new builds for the last 10 years,at least.

We have the oldest housing stock in Europe. Heat source pumps won't make a blind bit of difference until we get demolishing really. Until then there is no alternative to gas which is why we should continue exploiting our domestic supply rather than do what we do now which is outsource it to other countries.

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We have the oldest housing stock in Europe. Heat source pumps won't make a blind bit of difference until we get demolishing really. Until then there is no alternative to gas which is why we should continue exploiting our domestic supply rather than do what we do now which is outsource it to other countries.
Hence,why,as you seen to have missed out in quoting me, that insulation is important. Yes there are houses that heat source will be unsuitable, but, there is no reason(apart from cost) any house built in the last 60 years cannot be insulated to a standard that makes that suitable.
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8 minutes ago, jakedee said:

Hence,why,as you seen to have missed out in quoting me, that insulation is important. Yes there are houses that heat source will be unsuitable, but, there is no reason(apart from cost) any house built in the last 60 years cannot be insulated to a standard that makes that suitable.

Cost is a pretty massive reason which shows up in times like this with a price spike. Plus homes built in the last 60 years are about half of the total homes. Ultimately the original poster you replied to wasn't too far off. We aren't at all ready for the governments Net Zero target yet as can really see Scotland demolishing and rebuilding over a million homes in the next nine years?

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Hence,why,as you seen to have missed out in quoting me, that insulation is important. Yes there are houses that heat source will be unsuitable, but, there is no reason(apart from cost) any house built in the last 60 years cannot be insulated to a standard that makes that suitable.
We're looking to replace our 24 year old boiler and radiators with a heat pump system and/or solar panels. Initial capital costs are prohibitive but we'll effectively have no energy bills if we go ahead with it - in fact we may end up getting money back if we install solar and sell power back to the national grid.
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We're looking to replace our 24 year old boiler and radiators with a heat pump system and/or solar panels. Initial capital costs are prohibitive but we'll effectively have no energy bills if we go ahead with it - in fact we may end up getting money back if we install solar and sell power back to the national grid.
At the moment,Govt loans assist in the initial cost. RHI payments then assist in the repaying of that loan.
As I said above, if the Govt can introduce incentives like the scrappage scheme to remove older cars from the road, similar incentives for heating/insulation should be introduced.
Where there's a will ....etc
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At the moment,Govt loans assist in the initial cost. RHI payments then assist in the repaying of that loan.
As I said above, if the Govt can introduce incentives like the scrappage scheme to remove older cars from the road, similar incentives for heating/insulation should be introduced.
Where there's a will ....etc
How likely is that to happen though?
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1 hour ago, DeeTillEhDeh said:

We're looking to replace our 24 year old boiler and radiators with a heat pump system and/or solar panels. Initial capital costs are prohibitive but we'll effectively have no energy bills if we go ahead with it - in fact we may end up getting money back if we install solar and sell power back to the national grid.

That's the problem with anything about making insulation and heating more efficient for existing homes, the cost to the individual may be so much there is no financial reason for the individual household to do it, It's cheaper to just pay for more fuel to heat the home. However the cumulative impact for the country of a mass scheme to improve things would be enormous, so it really needs govt support and money for do it rather than just being left to the individual.

 

ps, I'm in a similar position, a 23 year old boiler that could be doing with being replaced.

Edited by Soapy FFC
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That's the problem with anything about making insulation and heating more efficient for existing homes, the cost to the individual may be so much there is no financial reason for the individual household to do it, It's cheaper to just pay for more fuel to heat the home. However the cumulative impact for the country of a mass scheme to improve things would be enormous, so it really needs govt support and money for do it rather than just being left to the individual.
 
ps, I'm in a similar position, a 23 year old boiler that could be doing with being replaced.
This, affordability is the key. High energy prices affect the consumer. The Govt have no incentive as their "energy bill" is footed by us(some would say it suits them)
if the Govt make it viable for homeowners like yourself, to convert their gas boilers to sustainable ones,then more people will do it. Most people do not have the will,or the means to upgrade to sustainable heating.
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4 hours ago, DeeTillEhDeh said:
4 hours ago, jakedee said:
Hence,why,as you seen to have missed out in quoting me, that insulation is important. Yes there are houses that heat source will be unsuitable, but, there is no reason(apart from cost) any house built in the last 60 years cannot be insulated to a standard that makes that suitable.

We're looking to replace our 24 year old boiler and radiators with a heat pump system and/or solar panels. Initial capital costs are prohibitive but we'll effectively have no energy bills if we go ahead with it - in fact we may end up getting money back if we install solar and sell power back to the national grid.

My house is a 32 year old bungalow. We looked at a heat pump alone and at a heat pump plus solar panels to replace our storage heaters. We decided that the savings from the solar weren't worth it, so went ahead with the air source heat pump alone.

Our system runs 10 radiators (2 living room, 2 hall, 4 bedrooms, 1 bathroom & the towel rail in the en suite) and gives us all the hot water we need . We went for the Mitsubishi Ecodan rather than a cheaper make, and it cost us about £11,000 all in.

When we got the EPC certificate done, we found that (as expected!) the insulation in the loft was not sufficient to allow us to get the RHI payments. We could have spent £200-£300ish and put an extra layer in the loft by laying it ourselves. However, we would have lost the flooring & storage space. Instead, we spent another £2000 to have a local joiner put down insulation & build a new floor above the insulation.

In all, therefore, we spent around £13000.

The RHI is paying just under £300/quarter, so I expect to recover around £8,400 in payments over the 7 years it is payable. Our electricity bills immediately halved, so at 2019 prices, our monthly bill went from over £200 to under £100 (the house is all-electric, so we have no other energy costs)

Accordingly, the system will pay for itself well within the 7 years, and the whole house is now warm - unlike with storage heaters!

Interest free loans were available, but we used some savings. However, as far as I'm aware, the loans are still free, and if you're on certain benefits (we weren't), some help is also available to upgrade insulation. 

I would encourage anyone to at least investigate the costs for their own house, but would warn against the cowboys that fit the chepest system possible for free (or for very little money) and get you to sign away the RHI payments to them. 

 

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13 hours ago, Paco said:


It would be the easiest thing in the world for the UK Government to mandate either very good insulation or heat pumps/electric power only in new build houses/flats. It would’ve been the easiest thing in the world to do years ago, frankly. They haven’t, and nor do they show any sign of intending to.

An individual with a bit of cash can convert their own home, no doubt about that. What in the name of f**k do you in a block of 40 flats set up to receive heat from gas-fired boilers?

I don't know if it is mandated or not but there's loads of new build near us in Edinburgh and they all seem to have solar panels.  

We looked at solar panels a few years ago but HMG had just done away with or substantially reduced the feed in tariffs so at that time we decided not to go ahead.  Looking back it was probably the wrong decision. Our bills are now mental. 

If the likely pay back period was say 5 years I'd probably bite your arm off. 

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