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Bands/artists who radically changed sound


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Discharge

Discharges early material is seminal work in the world of punk pretty much inventing the d-beat style plus influencing a metric fuckton of artists across punk, hardcore & metal.
 



For album number two they opted to jump on the glam bandwagon & pretty much kill their credibility in punk circles. Worth a listen alone for the vocals.

 


 

The band broke up not long after Grave New World but reformed in 1990 with material in the heavy metal realm before an eventual pivot back to their punk & hardcore roots. Still active as a band.
 

Edited by GNU_Linux
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Pyogenesis

Starting out playing a death/doom hybrid in the vein of bands like My Dying Bride, Paradise Lost et al with a move towards straight up goth/doom before the radical shift.

 





Ended up eventually playing run of the mill alt rock eventually leading to pop punk escapades.


 



 




Still around but zero idea how they sound these days.

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Ulver

Ulver's first three albums (known as the trilogy) were black metal with folk influence.

 




With album number 4 in 1998 the band pivoted fully leftfield into experimental electronica & industrial.


 




Since then Ulver have been all over the place sonically with their two most recent outings being in the synth pop realm.


 

 

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Not many artists can claim to be truly original and pushing forward the boundaries of popular music. Kraftwerk, Roxy Music/Eno, Beefheart, Prince, Public Enemy, Aphex Twin, Beach Boys would all be in with a shout. The one that came to my mind straight away was...

 

 

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I immediately thought Anathema. I first became aware of them when their first EP was coming out, and they were a Doom Metal band that went on tour with Cannibal Corpse. Didn't really tickle my fancy. I didn't hear anything else until more than twenty-odd years later, when a really good mainstream progressive rock song on a compilation CD turned out to be by them. Bought the album as a result, which was also excellent, but it couldn't have been further away from their origins.

Also, Nine Inch Nails' debut album was nothing like Trent Reznor's later work. Think a lot of people bought it based on Head Like a Hole and were surprised to find themselves with a poor Depeche Mode record. The following Broken and Fixed EPs were a lot different (and very good), and laid the foundations for where he'd end up going.

Bit before my time, but Celtic Frost were massively influential on the thrash and death metal scenes, then did a similarvolte-face to Discharge and released a glam rock album. It went down really well; there were older metal fans still spitting feathers about it when I discovered the genre years later  :lol:

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9 hours ago, BFTD said:

, Nine Inch Nails' debut album was nothing like Trent Reznor's later work. Think a lot of people bought it based on Head Like a Hole and were surprised to find themselves with a poor Depeche Mode record. The following Broken and Fixed EPs were a lot different (and very good), and laid the foundations for where he'd end up going.

Ministry went on a similar journey from their origins, though they were far louder/thrashier later on. 

Talk Talk was the name that sprung to mind straight away for me. 

Edited by Scorge
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5 hours ago, Scorge said:

Ministry went on a similar journey from their origins, though they were far louder/thrashier later on. 

Talk Talk was the name that sprung to mind straight away for me. 

I much prefer ministry's early work, when they we doing typical 80s synthpop. They've disavowed it now though.

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The Beastie boys are often overlooked in this respect went from hardcore punk, to comedy hip hop to much more technical sample based rap. 

 

 

 

Edited by cb_diamond
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Larry Graham (invented slap bass) 

Aphex Twin

Mad that the first ten years or so of hip hop went unrecorded, so we'll never really hear how that evolved. 

I read in Smash Hits when i was a child Cliff Richard claiming to have invented rock n roll. He clarified he meant in the UK. Then further clarified he meant he was the first to dress a certain way, with "puce socks". Still not sure what puce is. Anyway. Not Cliff. Lonnie Donegan, no Lonnie, no 60s.

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I've been meaning to check out Bowie's industrial period for about a quarter of a century since hearing Heart's Filthy Lesson on the credits of Se7en. Couldn't believe it when his name came up.

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17 hours ago, BFTD said:

I've been meaning to check out Bowie's industrial period for about a quarter of a century since hearing Heart's Filthy Lesson on the credits of Se7en. Couldn't believe it when his name came up.

Low and Heroes are my favourite Bowie albums.

Whenever I listen to either of them I wonder what the Ziggy Stardust era teenyboppers made of it all when it was released. I can imagine them sticking on side two of Low and wondering WTF it was all about. Same goes for the punks. Would teenage Pistols or Clash fans have listened to Low?

Hats off to Bowie for having the conjones to record those albums at that time. 

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