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EdinburghPar1975

Converting roof space

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Looking for some advice/ thoughts on some things we're thinking about.

We live in a 1930s detached bungalow and the loft space is already converted to a large room, toilet and walk in cupboard. The roof line hasn't been altered and there's velox windows in place.

As our kids are getting older we'd quite like to reconfigure upstairs to have two decent rooms and a bathroom. There is space in the floor plan to do that but it will need a few things moved about. Question is whether it is worth making extra headroom by having dormers put in round the sides and having the internal/ non supporting walls changed/moved (cheapest option) , whether we get rid of the garage at the side of the house and use that in order to extend out to the side and also extend upstairs sideways as well or do we go full on and change the roof so the height stays the same but the roof angle drastically changes.

All of these options have been done in houses round us so i don't think planning would be an issue for any option but just wondering what the P&B community have done if they've had this situation?

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2 hours ago, EdinburghPar1975 said:

Looking for some advice/ thoughts on some things we're thinking about.

We live in a 1930s detached bungalow and the loft space is already converted to a large room, toilet and walk in cupboard. The roof line hasn't been altered and there's velox windows in place.

As our kids are getting older we'd quite like to reconfigure upstairs to have two decent rooms and a bathroom. There is space in the floor plan to do that but it will need a few things moved about. Question is whether it is worth making extra headroom by having dormers put in round the sides and having the internal/ non supporting walls changed/moved (cheapest option) , whether we get rid of the garage at the side of the house and use that in order to extend out to the side and also extend upstairs sideways as well or do we go full on and change the roof so the height stays the same but the roof angle drastically changes.

All of these options have been done in houses round us so i don't think planning would be an issue for any option but just wondering what the P&B community have done if they've had this situation?

They will have probably put a lot of steel work in the walls to hold the roof up instead of normal joists so you might run into a lot of cost trying to move things round in the loft. The garage option might be easier to convert but will be a much bigger space. Could you not pitch a tent in the garden? That would be much cheaper.

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50 minutes ago, 101 said:

They will have probably put a lot of steel work in the walls to hold the roof up instead of normal joists so you might run into a lot of cost trying to move things round in the loft. The garage option might be easier to convert but will be a much bigger space. Could you not pitch a tent in the garden? That would be much cheaper.

I'd have them in the garden till they leave but the wife wants a proper roof over their heads, bit extreme if you ask me!

Garage has the benefit of also being able to be extended right back into a part of the garden, might be the best option...

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4 minutes ago, EdinburghPar1975 said:

I'd have them in the garden till they leave but the wife wants a proper roof over their heads, bit extreme if you ask me!

Garage has the benefit of also being able to be extended right back into a part of the garden, might be the best option...

Or convert the back half of the garage so you have storage for your bikes and lawn mover or stuff but also have an additional bedroom big enough for a kid. But agree your wife's actions will mean they never move out

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4 hours ago, EdinburghPar1975 said:

Looking for some advice/ thoughts on some things we're thinking about.

We live in a 1930s detached bungalow and the loft space is already converted to a large room, toilet and walk in cupboard. The roof line hasn't been altered and there's velox windows in place.

As our kids are getting older we'd quite like to reconfigure upstairs to have two decent rooms and a bathroom. There is space in the floor plan to do that but it will need a few things moved about. Question is whether it is worth making extra headroom by having dormers put in round the sides and having the internal/ non supporting walls changed/moved (cheapest option) , whether we get rid of the garage at the side of the house and use that in order to extend out to the side and also extend upstairs sideways as well or do we go full on and change the roof so the height stays the same but the roof angle drastically changes.

All of these options have been done in houses round us so i don't think planning would be an issue for any option but just wondering what the P&B community have done if they've had this situation?

We looked at dormer windows and converting attic space a few years ago but ultimately decided against it - it’s expensive and you don’t get extra space in terms of the overall size of the building.

We ended up extending out the side and up for roughly the same cost. Was the right decision IMO. Although the builders were arseholes - they generally are. 

if you’ve not extended a house before, remember to factor in the additional costs of making the new room(s) liveable e.g. carpet/ flooring and decoration etc. And allow for your wife, who will inevitably let you know that she’s seen this friend’s house and they did such and such and it was really good and it’s not much more and we should do the same and we’ll end up regretting not doing it and and and .....

I’d allow £10k over what you think it’ll cost. 

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You really need to talk to a local architect who is experienced in extensions in your area. They should have a rough idea of costs for the different options. You'll need to factor in fees for the architect, structural engineer and building warrant. If you know anyone who has had similar work done nearby it would be worth speaking to them to see if they would recommend their architect (and builder).

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Probably best doing something with the garage. Second best would be dormer windows. Do not remove the roof and replace with a steeper pitch- you'll gain very little and spend a fortune.

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Never mind extra bedrooms. Turn it into a home bar, it seems to be the in thing at the moment.

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If the kids are getting older and inevitably move out at some point, you need to ask yourself why you are extending the property. Do you need the reconfigured rooms or is it just for creating more space/ adding value? Do you expect to eventually move or is this your “forever home”? The answers to these questions might factor in your decision and outlay. 
i would say, if you are going to change upstairs and you have the money to spend, I’d go with extending over garage, in order to form better sized room spaces with minimal structural disruption. I wouldn’t change the roof unless there was a necessity tbh.

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7 hours ago, deegee said:

If the kids are getting older and inevitably move out at some point, you need to ask yourself why you are extending the property. Do you need the reconfigured rooms or is it just for creating more space/ adding value? Do you expect to eventually move or is this your “forever home”? The answers to these questions might factor in your decision and outlay. 
i would say, if you are going to change upstairs and you have the money to spend, I’d go with extending over garage, in order to form better sized room spaces with minimal structural disruption. I wouldn’t change the roof unless there was a necessity tbh.

Both kids are still quite young (7 and 10) but it's more about trying to get work done soon that will be needed later on. They both have their own rooms just now but one is a bit on the small side. The extra rooms are just for creating better spaces and not really about creating value as we've no intention of moving again.

At the minute i'm leaning towards extending over the garage and also putting dormers in to improve the headroom area already there.

A lot of neighbours have had work done and luckily all seem pretty happy with who they've used. Fair bit of homework needed i think...

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14 hours ago, 18May1991 said:

 

We ended up extending out the side and up for roughly the same cost. Was the right decision IMO. Although the builders were arseholes - they generally are. 

if you’ve not extended a house before, remember to factor in the additional costs of making the new room(s) liveable e.g. carpet/ flooring and decoration etc. And allow for your wife, who will inevitably let you know that she’s seen this friend’s house and they did such and such and it was really good and it’s not much more and we should do the same and we’ll end up regretting not doing it and and and .....

I’d allow £10k over what you think it’ll cost. 

Jesus, this is absolutely spot on. Well except the £10k bit - too low!

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18 minutes ago, EdinburghPar1975 said:

Both kids are still quite young (7 and 10) but it's more about trying to get work done soon that will be needed later on. They both have their own rooms just now but one is a bit on the small side. The extra rooms are just for creating better spaces and not really about creating value as we've no intention of moving again.

At the minute i'm leaning towards extending over the garage and also putting dormers in to improve the headroom area already there.

A lot of neighbours have had work done and luckily all seem pretty happy with who they've used. Fair bit of homework needed i think...

Buy one of the houses that has already been extended/converted.

Save yourself a lot of grief.

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Just now, Jacksgranda said:

Buy one of the houses that has already been extended/converted.

Save yourself a lot of grief.

Whilst that is great advice there is no way i could afford to buy a bigger house in the area i'm in (which we really like). We got this house about 5 years ago and a combination of things (person desperate to sell in January, housing market not great etc.) meant that we could just get it. Given the house price increases round here i doubt i could afford to buy my own house if it was up for sale now.

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Would the price of your own + what it will cost for the proposed extension (and finishing/furnishing same - don't forget the plus £10,000 over your budget) not get you over the finishing line?

ETA: Anyway, best of luck and keep us posted.

Edited by Jacksgranda

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Or get a company like this in - https://moduloft.co.uk/

 

 

Basically they build your loft in a factory, complete with electrics, plumbing, bathroom fittings etc etc. Then they cut off your roof and drop the new one in. Can be done more or less in a day. 

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1 hour ago, EdinburghPar1975 said:

Both kids are still quite young (7 and 10) but it's more about trying to get work done soon that will be needed later on. They both have their own rooms just now but one is a bit on the small side. The extra rooms are just for creating better spaces and not really about creating value as we've no intention of moving again.

At the minute i'm leaning towards extending over the garage and also putting dormers in to improve the headroom area already there.

A lot of neighbours have had work done and luckily all seem pretty happy with who they've used. Fair bit of homework needed i think...

This all makes sense mate, especially looking at your subsequent comments about increased house prices in your area etc. You’ll be having the children for at least another decade and with an increased and improved upper living areas, you will all get the benefit. Your comment in later message about the neighbours being pleased with the work they have carried out is worth noting as having a recommended and competent contractor (and architect) are worth their weight in gold. These lads will know what is needed in your area and type of property, and having a good reputation will hopefully take away a lot of the pot luck and stress with your project. 

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2 hours ago, NewBornBairn said:

Or get a company like this in - https://moduloft.co.uk/

 

 

Basically they build your loft in a factory, complete with electrics, plumbing, bathroom fittings etc etc. Then they cut off your roof and drop the new one in. Can be done more or less in a day. 

Impressive.  I guess in terms of hassle for the owner it's a great option, but cost wise I wonder if it's even more expensive than an on-site build as the same labour and materials would be needed and you need to factor in transport and crane cost etc.  I'd also worry a little about whether the final build would fit exactly as it should.

All that said though, quite impressive.

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1 hour ago, hk blues said:

Impressive.  I guess in terms of hassle for the owner it's a great option, but cost wise I wonder if it's even more expensive than an on-site build as the same labour and materials would be needed and you need to factor in transport and crane cost etc.  I'd also worry a little about whether the final build would fit exactly as it should.

All that said though, quite impressive.

I know a couple of the companies that do it and it works surprisingly well. Ideally they like to work with councils and housing associations though because then they can do an entire terrace at a time. 

 

Labour charges are a lot less because a lot of the factory work is automated.

 

(Edit - for example, Stewart Milne can produce an entire house timberframe kit in 40 minutes from unsawn wood to palleted unit ready to go on the lorry.) 

Edited by NewBornBairn

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