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4 hours ago, Shanner said:

it's not at all similar. 

Your obviously not understanding what is meant by the post or just totally ignoring what the sentence means or is trying to relate to

The similarities is factual or will be once the winners of the WOSFl happen, if it does this year unless its null and void.
Meaning it will only state in the history books that some team won the league, it wont mention that teams good enough to win the league or potentially did not play.
Fact is Auchinleck or Pollok or the others did not win the league in season 2020/21. So in 2025 or 2030 and so on, no one will be interested who was in the division they will just see who the winners of the WOSFL in 2020/21 was......

 

Edited by Bestsinceslicebread

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10 years from now no one will care. If the "big clubs" live up to their reputation they won't be in the WoS Premier for long. No one will care that much about how strong or weak the league was in 2020.

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So why are you pointing it out when people know, Talbot fans have done something to you and I would like to know what it was?



I just don’t like Talbot fans especially one’s like yourself

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On 15/01/2021 at 04:51, TheAftonBear said:

Aye its still an achievment but less so when there's 5 teams missing ,  at least 3 of which would have been challenging for the title. But like it or not it will always be remembered as a unique season that wasn't competed with all the teams. Hopefully the only time that can be said though

Its fair comment.  Does Allan Wells think the less of his Gold in 1980 with all of the boycotting  though ? It is what it is and what a first season. I dont blame any club for taking the decision they did that suited them.  Mainly financial grounds IMHO but thats perfectly reasonable and understandable. I hope we can restart as its been going pretty well albeit the conditions are a bit Spartan and unusual.  If not then we gave it a go and possibly in a better place than if we'd gone 18 months without playing. Best wishes to all ... stay safe out there. 

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Think that unless something is decided before the season starts - PPG or something, then most titles will be tainted in some eyes. That's what upset the majority of clubs down south - teams running away with it and clearly getting promoted, were cruelly denied. Hopefully the current season can end without the null and void.

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On 15/01/2021 at 22:42, Yogi said:

 

 


I just don’t like Talbot fans especially one’s like yourself

 

 

You've ruined my life with that statement.

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Are clubs allowed to train at the moment? If not and they are keeping by the rules I would think they’ll need a couple of weeks to get back to fitness before a restart.

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There won't be a restart. Season is over...

Are clubs allowed to train at the moment? If not and they are keeping by the rules I would think they’ll need a couple of weeks to get back to fitness before a restart.

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6 minutes ago, andy25 said:

There won't be a restart. Season is over...

There will obviously need to be a cut off point that it is called for me it would be March, but as I asked are they allowed to train, the longer there not if that is the case the longer to get back to match fitness.

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Just now, Ceejayar said:

There will obviously need to be a cut off point that it is called for me it would be March, but as I asked are they allowed to train, the longer there not if that is the case the longer to get back to match fitness.

Everything is meant to be suspended.

The league was going to run into June. There is probably still going to be time for a short return to complete a single round robin. With a couple weeks of prep depending on time spent idle. 

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36 minutes ago, Ceejayar said:

There will obviously need to be a cut off point that it is called for me it would be March, but as I asked are they allowed to train, the longer there not if that is the case the longer to get back to match fitness.

No teams are allowed to train or play games.
No one can play or train from the Scottish First division through to every level of football, including all junior, all amateur all youth levels except players and teams at U12s and below, (u12 team means all the players must be 11 year old, if they turn 12 they cannot participate)

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49 minutes ago, FairWeatherFan said:

Everything is meant to be suspended.

The league was going to run into June. There is probably still going to be time for a short return to complete a single round robin. With a couple weeks of prep depending on time spent idle. 

We've seen this picture before though. My right nut says there are teams still training.

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Darvel

We've seen this picture before though. My right nut says there are teams still training.

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1 hour ago, jazzy said:

Wouldn't surprise me 

As a Darvel supporter I would be disappointed if this were the case as I have had family die due to Covid.

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6 hours ago, jimbaxters said:

We've seen this picture before though. My right nut says there are teams still training.

Certainly a couple down my way although pretty sure they're Amateur teams but didn't want to get too close to see the badges on their training tops.

Someone was taking pictures and moaning their faces off so expect to see them turn up on social media at some point.

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Make of this what you may given the SP/SFA's view that the Guidance for playing matches which worked up to now, it seems, is no longer fit for purpose. A couple of days ago there was a long "Explainers" article on the BBC web site (so it must be correct/true?) about Covid.  It's written by David Shukman,   Science editor, and is headed:

 Covid-19: Can you catch the virus outside?

With the risk of catching coronavirus indoors well established, the little allowed contact with friends under lockdown is for outdoor exercise.

But what are the risks when you go for a walk with a friend? And can you catch coronavirus from a jogger, or people sheltering at a bus stop to escape the rain?

What makes the outdoors safer?

Researchers say infections can happen outdoors, but the chances are massively reduced.

Fresh air disperses and dilutes the virus.

It also helps to evaporate the liquid droplets in which it is carried.

On top of that, ultraviolet light from the Sun should kill any virus that's out in the open.

Even so, there are a handful of cases where it's believed that infections did happen outside.

One study found that two men in China talking face-to-face for at least 15 minutes was enough to spread the virus.

So the risks are low but not zero, but what are they?

How close are you to others?

If someone's infected - maybe without realising it because they have no symptoms - they'll be releasing the virus as they breathe, especially if they cough.

Some of that will be carried in droplets, most of which will quickly fall to the ground but could reach your eyes, nose or mouth if you're within 2m (6ft) of them.

So the advice is to avoid being face-to-face if you're that close.

The infected person will also release smaller particles called aerosols.

Indoors, these can accumulate in the air and be a hazard, outside they should rapidly disperse.

How long are you together for?

Walking past someone in the street or having a jogger run by you, means you're close together for a few seconds at most.

Fleeting encounters are highly unlikely to be long enough for enough virus to reach you.

"We don't want people to be terrified of passing each other in the street," says Prof Cath Noakes, a government adviser speaking in a personal capacity.

She says someone would have to cough right at you, and for you to inhale at just the wrong moment, for an infection to happen.

But she also warns of friends spending a long time together outdoors and assuming they're completely safe.

Going for a run with someone and following close behind them for 20 minutes or more, breathing in their slipstream, might be a problem, she says.

"The sad fact is that your greatest risk is from the people you know."

Are you properly out in the open?

Scientists have found that the risks are low in fully open spaces.

But they worry about areas that are not just crowded but also partly enclosed, such as market stalls or bus shelters.

Whenever the air is still, it can become stagnant and contaminated.

It's in environments like narrow pathways or busy queues that government advisers say face coverings may be needed.

Can you catch it from a park bench (or other surfaces)?

If an infected person coughs into their hand and then wipes it on a surface, the virus may survive there for hours.

Researchers in the US found virus on the handles of rubbish bins and the buttons at pedestrian crossings.

They reckon this may have led to infections in the area, though at a relatively low level compared with other ways of spreading the virus.

But in the winter, the virus may last longer in the open.

It thrives in low temperatures - it may be one reason why there have been outbreaks in chilly meat-processing plants.

Added to that, it's the season when your nose runs in the cold, and a common reaction is to wipe it with your hand.

That might raise the chances of surfaces becoming contaminated.

However, many scientists now think that the amount of virus likely to be left on a surface in this way would be minimal, and would disperse within an hour or two.

"The chance of transmission through inanimate surfaces is very small," says Prof Emmanuel Goldman of Rutgers University.

Where are the risks greatest?

All the evidence points to the vast majority of Covid infections happening indoors.

The virus is transmitted through human interaction, especially when people are together for a long period of time.

That means the virus can spread in several different ways.

Either infected droplets can land on people close by, or contaminate surfaces that others touch.

And if rooms are stuffy, tiny virus particles can accumulate in the air and get inhaled.

It's in households where all of this is most likely to happen.

Edited by Dev
.

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1 hour ago, Dev said:

Make of this what you may given the SP/SFA's view that the Guidance for playing matches which worked up to now, it seems, is no longer fit for purpose. A couple of days ago there was a long "Explainers" article on the BBC web site (so it must be correct/true?) about Covid.  It's written by David Shukman,   Science editor, and is headed:

 Covid-19: Can you catch the virus outside?

With the risk of catching coronavirus indoors well established, the little allowed contact with friends under lockdown is for outdoor exercise.

But what are the risks when you go for a walk with a friend? And can you catch coronavirus from a jogger, or people sheltering at a bus stop to escape the rain?

What makes the outdoors safer?

Researchers say infections can happen outdoors, but the chances are massively reduced.

Fresh air disperses and dilutes the virus.

It also helps to evaporate the liquid droplets in which it is carried.

On top of that, ultraviolet light from the Sun should kill any virus that's out in the open.

Even so, there are a handful of cases where it's believed that infections did happen outside.

One study found that two men in China talking face-to-face for at least 15 minutes was enough to spread the virus.

So the risks are low but not zero, but what are they?

How close are you to others?

If someone's infected - maybe without realising it because they have no symptoms - they'll be releasing the virus as they breathe, especially if they cough.

Some of that will be carried in droplets, most of which will quickly fall to the ground but could reach your eyes, nose or mouth if you're within 2m (6ft) of them.

So the advice is to avoid being face-to-face if you're that close.

The infected person will also release smaller particles called aerosols.

Indoors, these can accumulate in the air and be a hazard, outside they should rapidly disperse.

How long are you together for?

Walking past someone in the street or having a jogger run by you, means you're close together for a few seconds at most.

Fleeting encounters are highly unlikely to be long enough for enough virus to reach you.

"We don't want people to be terrified of passing each other in the street," says Prof Cath Noakes, a government adviser speaking in a personal capacity.

She says someone would have to cough right at you, and for you to inhale at just the wrong moment, for an infection to happen.

But she also warns of friends spending a long time together outdoors and assuming they're completely safe.

Going for a run with someone and following close behind them for 20 minutes or more, breathing in their slipstream, might be a problem, she says.

"The sad fact is that your greatest risk is from the people you know."

Are you properly out in the open?

Scientists have found that the risks are low in fully open spaces.

But they worry about areas that are not just crowded but also partly enclosed, such as market stalls or bus shelters.

Whenever the air is still, it can become stagnant and contaminated.

It's in environments like narrow pathways or busy queues that government advisers say face coverings may be needed.

Can you catch it from a park bench (or other surfaces)?

If an infected person coughs into their hand and then wipes it on a surface, the virus may survive there for hours.

Researchers in the US found virus on the handles of rubbish bins and the buttons at pedestrian crossings.

They reckon this may have led to infections in the area, though at a relatively low level compared with other ways of spreading the virus.

But in the winter, the virus may last longer in the open.

It thrives in low temperatures - it may be one reason why there have been outbreaks in chilly meat-processing plants.

Added to that, it's the season when your nose runs in the cold, and a common reaction is to wipe it with your hand.

That might raise the chances of surfaces becoming contaminated.

However, many scientists now think that the amount of virus likely to be left on a surface in this way would be minimal, and would disperse within an hour or two.

"The chance of transmission through inanimate surfaces is very small," says Prof Emmanuel Goldman of Rutgers University.

Where are the risks greatest?

All the evidence points to the vast majority of Covid infections happening indoors.

The virus is transmitted through human interaction, especially when people are together for a long period of time.

That means the virus can spread in several different ways.

Either infected droplets can land on people close by, or contaminate surfaces that others touch.

And if rooms are stuffy, tiny virus particles can accumulate in the air and get inhaled.

It's in households where all of this is most likely to happen.

I didn't see anything about close man marking, consistently in bodily contact with people who have not been tested and car sharing. Also, where do you think the others in your household get it? From other people. It's not hugely relevant here.

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8 hours ago, Dev said:

Make of this what you may given the SP/SFA's view that the Guidance for playing matches which worked up to now, it seems, is no longer fit for purpose. A couple of days ago there was a long "Explainers" article on the BBC web site (so it must be correct/true?) about Covid.  It's written by David Shukman,   Science editor, and is headed:

 Covid-19: Can you catch the virus outside?

With the risk of catching coronavirus indoors well established, the little allowed contact with friends under lockdown is for outdoor exercise.

But what are the risks when you go for a walk with a friend? And can you catch coronavirus from a jogger, or people sheltering at a bus stop to escape the rain?

What makes the outdoors safer?

Researchers say infections can happen outdoors, but the chances are massively reduced.

Fresh air disperses and dilutes the virus.

It also helps to evaporate the liquid droplets in which it is carried.

On top of that, ultraviolet light from the Sun should kill any virus that's out in the open.

Even so, there are a handful of cases where it's believed that infections did happen outside.

One study found that two men in China talking face-to-face for at least 15 minutes was enough to spread the virus.

So the risks are low but not zero, but what are they?

How close are you to others?

If someone's infected - maybe without realising it because they have no symptoms - they'll be releasing the virus as they breathe, especially if they cough.

Some of that will be carried in droplets, most of which will quickly fall to the ground but could reach your eyes, nose or mouth if you're within 2m (6ft) of them.

So the advice is to avoid being face-to-face if you're that close.

The infected person will also release smaller particles called aerosols.

Indoors, these can accumulate in the air and be a hazard, outside they should rapidly disperse.

How long are you together for?

Walking past someone in the street or having a jogger run by you, means you're close together for a few seconds at most.

Fleeting encounters are highly unlikely to be long enough for enough virus to reach you.

"We don't want people to be terrified of passing each other in the street," says Prof Cath Noakes, a government adviser speaking in a personal capacity.

She says someone would have to cough right at you, and for you to inhale at just the wrong moment, for an infection to happen.

But she also warns of friends spending a long time together outdoors and assuming they're completely safe.

Going for a run with someone and following close behind them for 20 minutes or more, breathing in their slipstream, might be a problem, she says.

"The sad fact is that your greatest risk is from the people you know."

Are you properly out in the open?

Scientists have found that the risks are low in fully open spaces.

But they worry about areas that are not just crowded but also partly enclosed, such as market stalls or bus shelters.

Whenever the air is still, it can become stagnant and contaminated.

It's in environments like narrow pathways or busy queues that government advisers say face coverings may be needed.

Can you catch it from a park bench (or other surfaces)?

If an infected person coughs into their hand and then wipes it on a surface, the virus may survive there for hours.

Researchers in the US found virus on the handles of rubbish bins and the buttons at pedestrian crossings.

They reckon this may have led to infections in the area, though at a relatively low level compared with other ways of spreading the virus.

But in the winter, the virus may last longer in the open.

It thrives in low temperatures - it may be one reason why there have been outbreaks in chilly meat-processing plants.

Added to that, it's the season when your nose runs in the cold, and a common reaction is to wipe it with your hand.

That might raise the chances of surfaces becoming contaminated.

However, many scientists now think that the amount of virus likely to be left on a surface in this way would be minimal, and would disperse within an hour or two.

"The chance of transmission through inanimate surfaces is very small," says Prof Emmanuel Goldman of Rutgers University.

Where are the risks greatest?

All the evidence points to the vast majority of Covid infections happening indoors.

The virus is transmitted through human interaction, especially when people are together for a long period of time.

That means the virus can spread in several different ways.

Either infected droplets can land on people close by, or contaminate surfaces that others touch.

And if rooms are stuffy, tiny virus particles can accumulate in the air and get inhaled.

It's in households where all of this is most likely to happen.

a lot of reading to find out you can indeed catch it outside. 

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Maybe put the current season on ice, then eventually finish it next - call it the 2021 season ? May buggar up some play offs etc, or just give them a miss OR make spfl2 larger just for next season (no relegation in 20/21)  PS I believe you can (unluckily)  catch the virus outdoors but we can't stay locked away indefinitely,can we ?

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