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NotThePars

Where's the Strangest Place You Want to Visit or Have Visited?

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I met a chap in Bishkek who was attempting to be the youngest person ever to visit every country in the world. He had a strange air to him and didn't seem to be enjoying his quest. The look on his face when someone told him that a girl three years younger than him had already achieved the feat was priceless.

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21 hours ago, 101 said:

Sounds great. I always thought about £8k was the very cheapest I could get there for. 

I had planned to visit every continent before I was 25 but Covid has taken 2 years off that. My plan was Morocco last year Asian city short break on the way to NZ and then finish off in 2023 at the Medellin Christmas Festivities.

Sounds great.  Colombia is supposed to be beautiful. 

NZ was also brilliant and if I was ever to emigrate anywhere it would be NZ.  Too old for that now 

Edited by paul wright scores

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On 30/03/2021 at 15:02, ICTChris said:

Varosha, it's really an area of Famagusta rather than a city in itself.  It was the modern tourist part of Famagusta and they left it as a bargaining chip for a peace agreement but that didn't go anywhere so it's just fallen into ruin.  I've been to Famagusta a few times and we went for a walk on the beach by Famagusta.  It's really odd - there is a modern five star hotel there and they have waiters in bow ties serving drinks to people on loungers and 100 feet away there are all these ruined buildings behind a massive barbed wire fence.  I didn't take any photos as they don't like yhou photographing any of the Turkish army places but this from Wiki shows it well - 

Varoscha.jpg

 

The TRNC is kind of odd - because it's unrecognised and there is no investment from anywhere other than Turkey then you don't have all the international chains and places like that, so it feels quite distinctive.  It's also a lot more run down than Cyprus, if you go off the beaten path then there are obviously people living in real grinding poverty.  

We went to Nicosia one day and crossed the green line and the difference between the Turkish part (old winding streets, little cafes and small shops) and the modern unoccupied part is massive.  The Greek part is a completely modern city, complete with KFC, all mod cons, everything a lot more up to date.   While this obviously hinders the residents of Turkish Cyprus (they voted in favour of the reunification plan in the 2000s but the Greek Cypriots rejected it) it does mean the beaches are left untouched and its a bit more authentic.  We drove up the Karpas Peninsula and it had these beautiful beaches that would probably be mobbed if it was an open country but were basicallyh deserted or had some rudimentary beach huts.

My dad lived in Cyprus during the 1990s when the border was onlyopen to tourists, Cypriots couldn't go across.  My cousin went to visit him in and they drove up to the TRNC and when they got back to the village they lived in people found out they had gone and loads of people came to them asking if they could go back and take photographs of their parents graves or check if their houses were still there - people forget the real tragedy of it all.

I should read a bit more about Cyprus. I only know that Big Boss spent a decade in recovery there in the 70s and early 80s before escaping with Ocelot.

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I was working on the QE2 in the 90s when it made it first visit back to the Falklands since the 80s conflict when it had carried the troops down.
I had expected some excitement from the islanders but they seemed not to care one bit.
The squaddies that we met however were glad to see someone from the outside world and considered the locals to be a wee bit weird.
The ships football team played an army team and after the game went to one of Port Stanley’s two pubs for a pint only to be told by the landlord that they didn’t open for another half hour and we would need to wait outside. This despite the fact we would probably spend more in the next hour than they normally took in a month.
The locals were also known as Bennies due to the woollen hats they all wore similar to Benny from Crossroads.

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Yemen;

Sana'a is (was) an amazing city, with one of the oldest settlements in the world, just off the circle next to the Airport. Highlights of the many trips over there was a taxi with no windows in Sana'a, a 7 hour jeep trip through the desert to Marib with armed guards, swimming in the Ocean at Balhaf with Stingrays, Somali pirates and war ships and a bomb attack on our compound.

Sakhalin Island, Russia;

The end of the Earth taking a 14 hour train journey from Yuzhno to Nogliki, proper 'Hills Have Eyes' shit. Got my visa revoked and ordered to leave the country but that's a story for another day.

Taiwan;

They love thier Karaoke in Taipei! Bought a heap of semi automatic BB guns for a laugh and took them to Singapore (where I was staying at the time), turns out this carried the death penalty at the time. Got away with one that trip!

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Sakhalin sounds like great fun to travel to, even though it's probably a bit of a bin and with a heavy, psycho Russian military presence. They've got a football club as well so you can make an away day of it. 

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15 hours ago, virginton said:

Sakhalin sounds like great fun to travel to, even though it's probably a bit of a bin and with a heavy, psycho Russian military presence. They've got a football club as well so you can make an away day of it. 

Yeah, the fashion is very 1987, only at the Airport and Train stations is there any kind of police presence, and yes you are right very psycho, humourless looking folk, they are built like absolute brick shite houses. Good pubs.

The further north, more remote you go, the stranger the people look.

Go in the summer time and it's like our summers, go in the winter and it's about -35 deg.

When I worked out there for a good 8 months, I had to do a Bear training course, in case we ever came in to contact with them, you are meant to walk towards them making as much noise as you can. f**k that!

We did see some wild Bears, a mother and cubs, luckily we were in the Jeep at the time.

Interesting place, very Soviet looking.

Edited by johnnydun

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Not a holiday destination, but I remember reading a coffee table book a wee while ago about "Places on Earth You Can't Visit" or something which contained the usual haunts - Area 51, Chernobyl, etc. One of them was the LHC at CERN, which I had a wee chuckle at as I have been there. It was just before the tunnel was sealed to visitors (we were the last tour group to go into the tunnel and see the actual accelerator and experimental equipment - subsequent tours could only see the computing labs, visitor centre, lecture theatres etc.)CERN%20057%20Crossing%20the%20border%20with%20the%20LHC.jpeg.jpegCERN%20034%20ATLAS%20Scale.jpegCERN%20063%20'The%20Ring'.jpeg

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