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Coronavirus (COVID-19)


ICTChris

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22 minutes ago, welshbairn said:

I don't think I've ever criticised anyone for not following the rules, I've criticised them for constantly whining about them and reacting hysterically to every bit of news, instead of getting on with life like a grown up. There was a Hibs fan who made an excellent post about how he copes with London mask rules a few days ago, well worth a read for some of you.

Lying, thick, hypocritical c**t.

You’re on some roll tonight.  Enjoy the rest of it.

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On 30/11/2021 at 14:21, HibsFan said:

Again, not to put too fine a point on this, but just because it's a real-world example that backs up my slightly idealist 'just ignore the restrictions' mantra:

Iceland supermarket boss saying two things here (and I'm paraphrasing):

1) "Yes, the regulations are that everyone who isn't exempt has to wear masks in Iceland stores."

2) "No, my staff are not going to be the ones who enforce it. They are shopkeepers, not police officers."

That's been one of my biggest frustrations with how Britain* has tried to handle this pandemic, especially last year but continuing into 2021 too.

The utterly futile public spectacle, the theatre, the illusion of 'safety management' that has played out with trying to contain an airborne, respiratory virus.

Putting the onus on hospitality workers - often on minimum wage - to enforce rules they hardly believe in themselves about vertical drinking, or substantial meals, or putting a mask on to walk ten steps to the toilets. Putting the onus on a bus driver to stop some mad anti-masker c**t from boarding a bus because he "refuses to comply like the rest of you sheeple". When the f**k did this become every person's job?

So again, just like the boss of Iceland says: you, me and everyone else know what the rules are telling us we must do. We also know that, throughout this pandemic, the people in charge have been repeatedly seen to break the rules of the day. Cummings, Calderwood, countless others.

They are nonsensical. They are not worth listening to. They are best ignored.

Don't make yourself into some sort of contrarian, 'I will not comply and the kids don't see me any more' dickhead. Just ignore it all as best as you can.

Essentially, every time I hear the Transport for London announcement telling me "you must wear a face covering whilst using TfL services. It's there to protect us all", I give them one of these and move on with my life.

Wink.gif.dc64c71f57645550624eadc7bc158470.gif

Until someone with the power to fine/caution/arrest me comes along (at which point I will throw a mask on for an easy life), that will be how I go about my life.

I can't recommend it enough, disengaging with COVID and everything attached to it - including this thread since about April 2021 - has been liberating. 

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*Not just in Scotland, not just in England, probably best to keep the 'oh the SNP/Tories have handled it so much better!' chat to a minimum when both have been a fucking disaster in very different, but also at times very similar, ways.

 

 

On 30/11/2021 at 14:49, HibsFan said:

In London, where technically since Sadiq Khan's announcement it has been just as mandatory to wear a face mask on a bus as it has been in Scotland, I have walked onto at least a hundred buses without wearing a mask, and not been asked by one driver.

If one did, I would put the one on that I carry with me.

I have put it on once or twice on buses when they have got very full, and also did once when I was mildly choking on a sweet and probably made the whole upper deck think I was riddled with COVID.

Anyway, back to the hypothetical of a bus driver politely asking, I'd say 'sure, no bother', put it on, and then sit down on the bus. Depending on its capacity (especially on the upper deck when it's me and two other people sat up there), I would take it off again. If it is a 50%+ or more full bus, I'd probably keep it on.

However, more than anything, I just want to reach a point where, if I leave the house and forget my mask in a rush, it isn't something I then have to double back for because no driver would let me on. That's a very different kind of exemption to a medical one, but I feel that it's nearly as important, at least in terms of getting us back to a normal society.

 

 

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2 hours ago, welshbairn said:

You could say the same about 15 days, it's about balance.

It's really not.

It's about you lecturing the rest of us about how we should comply.

Until something affects you personally and then it's "balance and commonsense".

You are a fucking hypocrite.

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While high profile examples have undoubtedly been corrosive to compliance levels and public trust, particularly those neither acknowledged or punished, "but other people broke the rules" is a famously ineffective defence and an even worse excuse.

I'd have thought those who constantly whine about being spoken down to like children would avoid "but whit aboot them" type arguments to justify or validate their own non-compliance, like the *ahem* plague.

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11 hours ago, Wee Bully said:

OK mate.  Whatever gets you through the night.

Old people dying of natural causes doesn't keep me up at night, no.

 

8 minutes ago, williemillersmoustache said:

While high profile examples have undoubtedly been corrosive to compliance levels and public trust, particularly those neither acknowledged or punished, "but other people broke the rules" is a famously ineffective defence and an even worse excuse.

I'd have thought those who constantly whine about being spoken down to like children would avoid "but whit aboot them" type arguments to justify or validate their own non-compliance, like the *ahem* plague.

I was breaking rules way back in March and April 2020, champ. greggy.png

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While high profile examples have undoubtedly been corrosive to compliance levels and public trust, particularly those neither acknowledged or punished, "but other people broke the rules" is a famously ineffective defence and an even worse excuse.
I'd have thought those who constantly whine about being spoken down to like children would avoid "but whit aboot them" type arguments to justify or validate their own non-compliance, like the *ahem* plague.

It's an entirely different story when it's the people making the rules that break them.
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1 minute ago, craigkillie said:


It's an entirely different story when it's the people making the rules that break them.

Of course it is, which is what I meant by high profile examples being corrosive. Everyone makes mistakes, there have been understandable lapses but it's more the lack of acknowledgement of some of these that has done the most damage.

This was really in reference to the attempted lynching of Welshbairn by the freedom mob. 

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govt nervtag Expert halfwit reports from his mental asylum.

https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/scientist-not-safe-christmas-party-6296757

no amount of jabs and restrictions will be enough, stop playing the game ffs

 

 “Personally, I wouldn’t feel safe going to a party at the moment, if it involves being indoors in an enclosed space where you’re close to other people, and people are not wearing masks.

“Even if they’ve been tested and vaccinated, I wouldn’t feel safe.”

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It's almost like the human immune system and vaccines work the same for this shan respiratory infection as they do all others once exposed to it.

Quote
Posted at 8:58

Sign boosters work against Omicron - UK expert

31284917-c2ae-43a2-8f1a-5836605ac924.jpg

BBC Breakfast

7efccee5-6f1f-4586-9fac-447f40c1afa2.png
Copyright: BBC

Following on from news of the UK booster study, the trial's chief investigator has told the BBC there are encouraging signs that existing booster vaccines will still offer protection against serious illness and death from the Omicron variant.

Prof Saul Faust, who led the trial at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, tells BBC Breakfast that while the UK’s vaccines have not been tested against Omicron yet, the results suggest the memory response of the body and its ability to respond to future infection “doesn’t seem to be as dependent on the variant”.

He adds that he hopes boosters will give “broad protection against multiple variants”.

image.gif

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