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ICTChris

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

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My wife's work is considered essential so they are all being lined up for vaccines but it seems to be opening up a huge can of worms with numerous issues which will affect a lot of businesses down the line.

They're working out who to send for their vaccination - do they just send everybody or only those in the office/facility? Do they send those working from home and if so, when do they tell them to come back into the workplace (assuming lockdown and the working from home restrictions reduce in the next month or so)?

Do they test women on maternity leave? Possibly no immediate need if they're not returning to work soon and probably not if they've not had the baby yet (assuming the guidance on that is still insufficient).

There are also a small number of people who object to the vaccine and refuse to take it. I assume when lockdown restrictions are eased that businesses can tell them to get back into the workplace and they can't refuse as it's been their decision to not take the vaccine when offered.

The whole lot sounds like a HR minefield that will probably see lawyers rubbing their hands when it gets rolled out in greater numbers and businesses are trying toget back to working as before.

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17 minutes ago, Archie McSquackle said:

My wife's work is considered essential so they are all being lined up for vaccines but it seems to be opening up a huge can of worms with numerous issues which will affect a lot of businesses down the line.

They're working out who to send for their vaccination - do they just send everybody or only those in the office/facility? Do they send those working from home and if so, when do they tell them to come back into the workplace (assuming lockdown and the working from home restrictions reduce in the next month or so)?

Do they test women on maternity leave? Possibly no immediate need if they're not returning to work soon and probably not if they've not had the baby yet (assuming the guidance on that is still insufficient).

My wife is on maternity leave and was offered it. She works in health and social care but won't be back until at least the summer, by which point all of her patients will most likely be vaccinated anyway, but they've still offered it. I'd imagine the hassle of not offering it to people on maternity leave outweighs the problem of offering it to people who are perhaps at less risk due to not currently working.

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Some interesting maths skills on display from the BBC here. That must be an error with the English figures?

COVID.thumb.PNG.88feac74e84e72e9c7dd710a1c64bb76.PNG

Edited by RiG

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25 minutes ago, realmadrid said:

But its the summer in South America and most nations there now have another spike, which in many cases is way higher than their first in what was their winter. 

What in their summer weather would have the same effect as our winter?

Depends on which part of South America you're talking about. If 'summer' is actually the wet season and winter dry then there's extra humidity for a start, and quite possibly more time spent indoors.

Other than southern Chile and the Falklands you're not going to find a parallel to a rock in the middle of an ocean that is drenched in cloud and rain for months on end. 

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3 hours ago, mizfit said:

 


Reimposed on 14th Feb guaranteed.

 

So long as restaurants stay shut for Valentine’s Day that will do me

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7 minutes ago, RiG said:

Some interesting math skills on display from the BBC here. That must be an error with the English figures?

COVID.thumb.PNG.88feac74e84e72e9c7dd710a1c64bb76.PNG

The figure for England must be the number done that day whereas figures for rUK must be totals?

Northern Ireland is quietly doing very well on vaccine rollout.  I believe they've done almost all care homes.  Good work from the Bunfields, who will be keen to get back to normal for rioting season this summer.  

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3 minutes ago, ICTChris said:

The figure for England must be the number done that day whereas figures for rUK must be totals?

Northern Ireland is quietly doing very well on vaccine rollout.  I believe they've done almost all care homes.  Good work from the Bunfields, who will be keen to get back to normal for rioting season this summer.  

Free vaccines with cheddar cheese and pineapple on a stick IMO

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3 minutes ago, ICTChris said:

The figure for England must be the number done that day whereas figures for rUK must be totals?

Northern Ireland is quietly doing very well on vaccine rollout.  I believe they've done almost all care homes.  Good work from the Bunfields, who will be keen to get back to normal for rioting season this summer.  

Great work from the Nationalists IMO. Michelle O'Neil has been pretty vocal about ramping up the vaccines.

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4 hours ago, hk blues said:

They do if they don't have all the materials they need to do more than one at a time - or the labour.  Or the experience of building many houses at once.

^^^^ "Spent all the money buying the land" type post

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Here was me thinking that Scotland's piss-poor performance was all down to our noble prioritisation of care homes. Yet the pallet burners have put them at the top of their list as well and seem to have a 50% higher rate of vaccination. 

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1 minute ago, virginton said:

Here was me thinking that Scotland's piss-poor performance was all down to our noble prioritisation of care homes. Yet the pallet burners have put them at the top of their list as well and seem to have a 50% higher rate of vaccination. 

Citizen compliance being one of the many benefits of being governed by armed militia IMO 

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265k now vaccinated. Assuming this is upto 8:30am this morning it’s much lower than I was hoping for unfortunately, about 20k done on both Saturday and Sunday. Improvement but not enough.

Care homes ‘almost done’. I see no reason for excuses not to be 30-40k a day this week, and we’re going to need to be to get anywhere near the targets.

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Local GP practice not vaccinating daily. They have allocated 2 days in the next 10 for vaccination and say they have capacity in those two days to apply every dose they have been provided with. If most surgeries operate in a similar manner then daily updates are going to prove pretty pointless as an indicator of where we are in this roll out.

NS adamant again we remain firmly on course to meet their targets.

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26 minutes ago, virginton said:

Depends on which part of South America you're talking about. If 'summer' is actually the wet season and winter dry then there's extra humidity for a start, and quite possibly more time spent indoors.

Other than southern Chile and the Falklands you're not going to find a parallel to a rock in the middle of an ocean that is drenched in cloud and rain for months on end. 

I wish people would stop thinking that it's the weather that directly drives infections re- seasonality.  it's about how much time you spend indoors where the virus does the bulk of it's spreading.   People in roasting hot countries don't all head to the park with a carry out when it's 35 degrees for the 50th day in a row.  Only folk from cold damp cloudy places like here do that, where hot weather is the norm they minimise their time in the sun. and there's also things like monsoons like you mention .

There's also cultural differences too, in some places it's quite rare to be invited into another persons home whereas in others it's the number one means of socialising , as well as differences in how people work across different countries. for instance in many countries in latin America Africa or the Caribbean  there is no such thing as furlough or even a dole for the unemployed. simply shutting everything down and telling the staff to stay in their homes isn't an option for some

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Care homes are ‘almost done’ which will hopefully see resources opened up but that won’t help if GPs don’t have the vaccine!

In fact, there are an estimated 555k in Groups 1 & 2, expected to be done by the ‘start of February’. To me that’s Monday 1st Feb. We’ll need to see about 20k a day to get there. So that one is surely very doable.

The concerning one is Groups 3, 4 & 5. 880k in there, I think, to be done by the end of Feb. Even if we started today it’s 21k per day, in addition to the 20k or so a day needed to hit the first target.

It needs to rise and it needs to rise pretty quickly. In fairness to the SG their plans show an exponential growth in numbers starting next Monday. It’ll be needed!

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3 minutes ago, effeffsee_the2nd said:

I wish people would stop thinking that it's the weather that directly drives infections re- seasonality.  it's about how much time you spend indoors where the virus does the bulk of it's spreading.   People in roasting hot countries don't all head to the park with a carry out when it's 35 degrees for the 50th day in a row.  Only folk from cold damp cloudy places like here do that, where hot weather is the norm they minimise their time in the sun. and there's also things like monsoons like you mention .

There's also cultural differences too, in some places it's quite rare to be invited into another persons home whereas in others it's the number one means of socialising , as well as differences in how people work across different countries. for instance in many countries in latin America Africa or the Caribbean  there is no such thing as furlough or even a dole for the unemployed. simply shutting everything down and telling the staff to stay in their homes isn't an option for some

Also see quite a lot of multi generational family homes in Med and Asian households. 

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I am completely ignorant presumably but I don't understand 1) how a care home can't be vaccinated in a single day and 2) how care homes can be slower to vaccinate than herding the cats of over 80s who live in the community into a centralised point at specific individual appointments. Someone explain this to me please.

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