Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Crùbag

Ireland

Recommended Posts

Interesting flight of fancy piece in yesterday’s Sunday Times about how reunification wouldn’t be an entirely outlandish idea on Boris’s watch but equally how Dublin really doesn’t want it back. 

Basic premise was Churchill (Boris’s hero) tried to give Ulster away to Dublin a couple of times but couldn’t persuade them to take it.

It now costs £11bn to run for 1.5m people who have no strategic or economic benefit to the wider U.K.  and who are overwhelmingly anti-Brexit. No real upsides for Westminster in working hard to keep it. And the pesky Irish Sea border problem with the EU would also be solved because there actually would become a border in the Irish Sea. 

But then, from the Irish perspective, it’d mean each southern taxpayer having to fork out an extra £1700 a skull in taxes just to maintain the status quo in the Province when the south have far more pressing issues to deal with in their public finances. And then what would they do with all those unruly Protestants who would feel that they had been sold out and likely cause a fair old kerfuffle? 
 

Conclusion seemed to be the Province is currently a bit of a nobody’s child. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, alta-pete said:

Interesting flight of fancy piece in yesterday’s Sunday Times about how reunification wouldn’t be an entirely outlandish idea on Boris’s watch but equally how Dublin really doesn’t want it back. 

Basic premise was Churchill (Boris’s hero) tried to give Ulster away to Dublin a couple of times but couldn’t persuade them to take it.

It now costs £11bn to run for 1.5m people who have no strategic or economic benefit to the wider U.K.  and who are overwhelmingly anti-Brexit. No real upsides for Westminster in working hard to keep it. And the pesky Irish Sea border problem with the EU would also be solved because there actually would become a border in the Irish Sea. 

But then, from the Irish perspective, it’d mean each southern taxpayer having to fork out an extra £1700 a skull in taxes just to maintain the status quo in the Province when the south have far more pressing issues to deal with in their public finances. And then what would they do with all those unruly Protestants who would feel that they had been sold out and likely cause a fair old kerfuffle? 
 

Conclusion seemed to be the Province is currently a bit of a nobody’s child. 

That could have been written nearly every year since 1970, apart from maybe the EU bit. And raising Irish welfare state levels to match NI expectations would be a stretch too, though the NI health service seems to be falling apart to meet it, so maybe not that hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, alta-pete said:

Interesting flight of fancy piece in yesterday’s Sunday Times about how reunification wouldn’t be an entirely outlandish idea on Boris’s watch but equally how Dublin really doesn’t want it back. 

Basic premise was Churchill (Boris’s hero) tried to give Ulster away to Dublin a couple of times but couldn’t persuade them to take it.

It now costs £11bn to run for 1.5m people who have no strategic or economic benefit to the wider U.K.  and who are overwhelmingly anti-Brexit. No real upsides for Westminster in working hard to keep it. And the pesky Irish Sea border problem with the EU would also be solved because there actually would become a border in the Irish Sea. 

But then, from the Irish perspective, it’d mean each southern taxpayer having to fork out an extra £1700 a skull in taxes just to maintain the status quo in the Province when the south have far more pressing issues to deal with in their public finances. And then what would they do with all those unruly Protestants who would feel that they had been sold out and likely cause a fair old kerfuffle? 
 

Conclusion seemed to be the Province is currently a bit of a nobody’s child. 

No way !!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Tasty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 18/02/2020 at 06:38, sportsterx said:

 Not true, Churchill did want a reunified Ireland, but, as part of the British empire.

 

But that's a no go for Dublin , Churchill had a history of ridiculing and trashing Ireland, also his Black and tans and his refusal to take responsibility for the Gallipoli disaster , were thousands of Irish were slaughtered.

IIRC Churchill really did not like Ireland being neutral during the war and offered the North up as a sop to get them in.

However given the recent history there was no way De Valera could go for it.

At best Ireland was neutral in a way that leaned towards the Allies.  Downed British pilots where repatriated but German ones were not.

16,000 Irish citizens voluteered to fight the Germans and the two secret services worked closely together though secretly at that.

Also a weather station in Ireland advised when D-Day could go ahead.

Nonetheless De Valera still sent his condolences to the German ambassador concerning the death of Hitler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 17 February 2020 at 22:32, alta-pete said:

Interesting flight of fancy piece in yesterday’s Sunday Times about how reunification wouldn’t be an entirely outlandish idea on Boris’s watch but equally how Dublin really doesn’t want it back. 

Basic premise was Churchill (Boris’s hero) tried to give Ulster away to Dublin a couple of times but couldn’t persuade them to take it.

It now costs £11bn to run for 1.5m people who have no strategic or economic benefit to the wider U.K.  and who are overwhelmingly anti-Brexit. No real upsides for Westminster in working hard to keep it. And the pesky Irish Sea border problem with the EU would also be solved because there actually would become a border in the Irish Sea. 

But then, from the Irish perspective, it’d mean each southern taxpayer having to fork out an extra £1700 a skull in taxes just to maintain the status quo in the Province when the south have far more pressing issues to deal with in their public finances. And then what would they do with all those unruly Protestants who would feel that they had been sold out and likely cause a fair old kerfuffle? 
 

Conclusion seemed to be the Province is currently a bit of a nobody’s child. 

Re-unification might never happen but it's even money there will be a Sinn Fein First Minister in NI this decade.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/02/2020 at 17:09, Jacksgranda said:

The PR system will make sure they don't do a UKIP. Whatever transpires in the attempt to form/maintain a government and then the fallout from the inability to form/maintain a government and how that is spun to pin the blame elsewhere will help to determine how Sinn Fein do in any subsequent election.

Also, if they do go into government, how much experience do they have among their TDs? They will be under intense scrutiny from a sceptical media. Sinn Fein will have to change their mantra about it all being the fault of the British government. And they'll have to take their begging bowl to Brussels now instead of London.

In the event of a subsequent election have they sufficient candidates of the required calibre to be in government?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-51570507

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 19/02/2020 at 14:32, MixuFixit said:

Well I reckon I wouldn't vote for a Party that has a Private Army to instruct them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MixuFixit said:


Have they ever done that?

But what are their options? Option 1 - let SF form a wafer thin majority via a coalition of dozens, frustrate it from carrying out their manifesto and wait for a collapse and hope to get elected next time?  But the public aren't daft and they don't like silly games frustrating the election winners (ref.  UK Parliament 2017-2019). And, of course, SF might do enough right to get re-elected with a clear majority next time.

Option 2  bite the bullet form a FG/FF/+1 coalition now, hope that the SF vote was largely a protest vote that melts away and  postpone worrying  about what to do at the next election until the next election? I don't know much about RoI politics but I think I know enough about human nature to think that option 2 is a big possibility, however difficult it is for FF/FG to swallow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But what are their options? Option 1 - let SF form a wafer thin majority via a coalition of dozens, frustrate it from carrying out their manifesto and wait for a collapse and hope to get elected next time?  But the public aren't daft and they don't like silly games frustrating the election winners (ref.  UK Parliament 2017-2019). And, of course, SF might do enough right to get re-elected with a clear majority next time.
Option 2  bite the bullet form a FG/FF/+1 coalition now, hope that the SF vote was largely a protest vote that melts away and  postpone worrying  about what to do at the next election until the next election? I don't know much about RoI politics but I think I know enough about human nature to think that option 2 is a big possibility, however difficult it is for FF/FG to swallow.

First time for everything it seems.

https://reut.rs/2T3XiLp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...