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1 hour ago, Burnie_man said:

We are charging €125/180 to do you a favour :blink:

Tickets are not massively oversubscribed. €50 tickets are for most venues, but that is only a small percentage of the stadium.

Because you travel to watch your team, that isn't an excuse to rip you off with ticket prices.  Do you even have a limit as to what you would pay? Personally if Scotland don't qualify I have zero appetite to spend oodles of cash watching Seribia v Austria at Hampden.

Tickets overall are massively over subscribed.  We don't know whether the highest price tickets are over subscribed, but come next summer I'd be very surprised if the Hampden games are not complete sell outs, whether Scotland are playing or not.

And I will say again - just because you think something is too expensive for you, doesn't mean it is a rip off!

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2 hours ago, CountyFan said:

Of course it's overpriced if your benchmark is Scotland vs Costa Rica in a friendly. If your benchmark is world class entertainment, it's the going rate. 

The group stage round of a 24 team European international competition (last featuring big-hitters like Albania, TFS and Hungary) is not even remotely in the bracket of 'world class' entertainment. That would be the knockout stages of the CL and - only if you're being generous - the World Cup finals in their current format. 

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2 hours ago, CountyFan said:

Live Football is a premium product now. It just is. Particularly an event with significant global interest like the euros. Look at comparable events in other sports and their pricing structures then come back to me. Look at big musical artists or theatre tickets and their relative pricing structures and you'll see the same thing. 

Of course it's overpriced if your benchmark is Scotland vs Costa Rica in a friendly. If your benchmark is world class entertainment, it's the going rate. You can choose to pay it or you can choose not to. Its genuinely baffling that so many don't seem to grasp this. 

Scotland v England in a World Cup Qualifier = £35.   Scotland v Slovenia in a Euro 2020 group game £160. Same seats.

If you can't see what the issue is here, then you simply contribute to the ever increasing prices at these tournaments.

This has (or should have) hee haw to do with anything else other than football.

Edited by Burnie_man

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1 hour ago, Gnash said:

Tickets overall are massively over subscribed.  We don't know whether the highest price tickets are over subscribed, but come next summer I'd be very surprised if the Hampden games are not complete sell outs, whether Scotland are playing or not.

And I will say again - just because you think something is too expensive for you, doesn't mean it is a rip off!

We do know that the mid and higher range tickets are not oversubscribed unless there was a last minute rush to snap up rip-off £160 tickets.

Hampden will sell out for Scotland (and an England) game.  Sell out for other games? depends who is playing, unlikely.

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4 hours ago, Gnash said:

I've never claimed to be left wing.

Anyway, what should UEFA do?  The tickets are already massively oversubscribed.  If they reduced the prices, they would be even more massively oversubscribed, meaning even more people would be disappointed. 

Personally, I find it incredible that people who have followed their country for decades without seeing them in a major tournament, spending thousands of pounds, baulk at paying a couple of hundred pounds for a pretty good chance of seeing them in a tournament in their own country.

I'm certainly not baulking at it - its more a case of that I'm not prepared to pay loads for tickets if Scotland don't qualify - those of us that do pay thousands of pounds traveling for the qualifiers will get tickets through the official Scotland allocation.  

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2 hours ago, welshbairn said:

What would yours be if Scotland made the last 16, say? (living the dream)

Not three figures.

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13 minutes ago, Burnie_man said:

Not three figures.

But you'd happily fork out 3 figures to Ryanair if it wasn't in Glasgow? Anyway, each to their own.

Edited by welshbairn

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9 minutes ago, GhostZapper said:

I'm certainly not baulking at it - its more a case of that I'm not prepared to pay loads for tickets if Scotland don't qualify - those of us that do pay thousands of pounds traveling for the qualifiers will get tickets through the official Scotland allocation.  

Fair enough.  I definitely don't have the points and I am willing to pay a large sum to get a decent chance of some tickets.

Worth noting that if Scotland don't qualify there is an opportunity to sell tickets to fans of the countries that will play in those games.  I checked the most likely countries, which include England and Spain, so I think there's a very good chance of resale if Scotland don't make it.

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12 minutes ago, welshbairn said:

But you'd happily fork out 3 figures to Ryanair if it wasn't in Glasgow? Anyway, each to their own.

I'm not sure of the relevance to be honest.

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46 minutes ago, Burnie_man said:

I'm not sure of the relevance to be honest.

Just that people will often pay wildly inflated airfares to follow their team or country abroad, but baulk at paying extra for a ticket for a major tournament. I don't see the logic.

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1 minute ago, welshbairn said:

Just that people will often pay wildly inflated airfares to follow their team or country abroad, but baulk at paying extra for a ticket for a major tournament. I don't see the logic.

Actually, I think Scotland fans are well versed in getting somewhere via the cheapest possible method.  I don't know anyone who willingly pays wildly inflated airfares unless they book the week before the game.

However, after paying £X to fly somewhere for a game (and a bit of a holiday), the last thing you want to experience is being ripped-off for a ticket although that very rarely happens.  A ticket to watch us play the worlds No.1 ranked team in Brussels was less than £30.  Kazakhstan in a brand new stadium with retractable roof was £1 (it was actually less but the SFA rounded it up).

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"Rip-off" - it's only a rip-off if you don't get what you paid for. Those paying these prices know exactly what they're getting, so the expression doesn't help. You could call it gouging, maybe.

What the prices are is exploitative, socially unfair and an insult to football's heritage.

Football isn't a business, and anyone who says it is can get in the sea. UEFA is owned by the national associations and the national associations are owned by the clubs. The purpose of a national association is not that of a business - the maximisation of profit. For the first century of organised, professional football, the clubs represented their home communities, their owners were generally wealthy people from within that community - factory owners, brewers, bankers. Sure, many of them looked down on the paying punters but they were fans too and they lived within that world.

We're 'supposed' to support our local club and our national teams. If football was a business who the hell would be paying to watch Partick Thistle or Scotland? If a business made me feel the way I felt after the 3-3 draw with Argentina a few weeks ago, I'd never give them my custom again. We invest so much emotional energy, and we refer to the clubs and countries as "we". That's what football always was.

It was also the game of the tenements. Everywhere in the world it is the sport of the working class. It was always the case that the lowest paid family and unemployed people could afford to watch their team and their national team in every home game. In most of the world they still can. We all swoon nostaligically over those pictures of Scottish football grounds in the 1950s, packed with working men. They could afford to watch any game at Hampden, from anywhere but the main stand, and they could bring their kids. That day is dead.

Those in charge of football now exploit our emotions into paying absolutely any stupid price they put on it, and they don't care who they've priced out, so long as they maximise revenue from capital deployed.

It would be nice if there were a bit of solidarity and those who can afford it refused to pay stupid prices, but that ship has long sailed. 

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46 minutes ago, GordonS said:

"Rip-off" - it's only a rip-off if you don't get what you paid for. Those paying these prices know exactly what they're getting, so the expression doesn't help. You could call it gouging, maybe.

What the prices are is exploitative, socially unfair and an insult to football's heritage.

Football isn't a business, and anyone who says it is can get in the sea. UEFA is owned by the national associations and the national associations are owned by the clubs. The purpose of a national association is not that of a business - the maximisation of profit. For the first century of organised, professional football, the clubs represented their home communities, their owners were generally wealthy people from within that community - factory owners, brewers, bankers. Sure, many of them looked down on the paying punters but they were fans too and they lived within that world.

We're 'supposed' to support our local club and our national teams. If football was a business who the hell would be paying to watch Partick Thistle or Scotland? If a business made me feel the way I felt after the 3-3 draw with Argentina a few weeks ago, I'd never give them my custom again. We invest so much emotional energy, and we refer to the clubs and countries as "we". That's what football always was.

It was also the game of the tenements. Everywhere in the world it is the sport of the working class. It was always the case that the lowest paid family and unemployed people could afford to watch their team and their national team in every home game. In most of the world they still can. We all swoon nostaligically over those pictures of Scottish football grounds in the 1950s, packed with working men. They could afford to watch any game at Hampden, from anywhere but the main stand, and they could bring their kids. That day is dead.

Those in charge of football now exploit our emotions into paying absolutely any stupid price they put on it, and they don't care who they've priced out, so long as they maximise revenue from capital deployed.

It would be nice if there were a bit of solidarity and those who can afford it refused to pay stupid prices, but that ship has long sailed. 

There are many urban definitions of what is a rip-off, such as a price that you know is unreasonably expensive, but which you'll still consider paying.  People happy to pay the prices for these tickets probably fall under that definition.

The rest of the post I agree with fully.

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Tickets overall are massively over subscribed.  We don't know whether the highest price tickets are over subscribed, but come next summer I'd be very surprised if the Hampden games are not complete sell outs, whether Scotland are playing or not.
And I will say again - just because you think something is too expensive for you, doesn't mean it is a rip off!


The day before the ballot ended, the Hamden games all showed green (aka how fucking much?) for the top priced tickets. The only game which was amber for the second most expensive tickets was the opener at Hampden.
The €50 tickets for Hampden games all showed red (aka everyone wants to pay €50).

That said, the games may well sell out in the end. I suppose that’ll depend on who is in Group D.

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Fair enough.  I definitely don't have the points and I am willing to pay a large sum to get a decent chance of some tickets.

Worth noting that if Scotland don't qualify there is an opportunity to sell tickets to fans of the countries that will play in those games.  I checked the most likely countries, which include England and Spain, so I think there's a very good chance of resale if Scotland don't make it.

 

How do you find out which countries are most likely to be in Group D?

 

Edit: found this. Explains England. Spain?

 

https://englandsupporters.thefa.com/fan-forums/f/23/t/14949

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3 hours ago, Burnie_man said:

There are many urban definitions of what is a rip-off, such as a price that you know is unreasonably expensive, but which you'll still consider paying.  People happy to pay the prices for these tickets probably fall under that definition.

The rest of the post I agree with fully.

Fairy nuff.

5 minutes ago, Scary Bear said:

 


How do you find out which countries are most likely to be in Group D?

 

Spain wouldn't be in the Group D as they would be playing in Bilbao, plus Dublin if Ireland qualify, but they would likely be favourites to make it to the last 16 match in Glasgow. They'd be in group E, and the winner of that plays third in A/B/C/D at Hampden.

For the groups, a certain amount can be inferred from who wouldn't be playing in Glasgow (eg Spain, Italy, Netherland etc - those who are also hosts) and taking them off the list of teams likely to qualify, but it leaves too many possibilities to be a worthwhile exercise.

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1 hour ago, Scary Bear said:

 

How do you find out which countries are most likely to be in Group D?

 

Edit: found this. Explains England. Spain?

 

https://englandsupporters.thefa.com/fan-forums/f/23/t/14949

f**k trying to work it out for Scotland if they qualify.

Quote

So to clarify, we will play at least two group games at Wembley, possibly all three and no more than one at Hampden.

If we win the group we would then play in Dublin in the second round and Rome in the quarters.
For a second place finish it would be Copenhagen and then Saint Petersburg. 
For finishing as one of the best third place teams the second round match could be either Bilbao, Glasgow or Budapest.
Read more at https://englandsupporters.thefa.com/fan-forums/f/23/t/14949#OYQ4HE2sXARligkO.99

P.S. I hope to f**k England don't make it to Budapest in the second round.

Edited by welshbairn

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16 hours ago, GordonS said:

Football isn't a business, and anyone who says it is can get in the sea.

While I completely see where you're coming from, unfortunately football is a business now.  It's shite, and it would be a lot better if it wasn't, but at the top level it's largely a money-making exercise.  

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12 hours ago, welshbairn said:

P.S. I hope to f**k England don't make it to Budapest in the second round.

The idea of a quarterfinal trip to Baku following a Budapest Round of 16 clash wouldn't ruffle any English feathers one bit I'd imagine 😇

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