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A Photographic History Of Scottish Football


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This sort of stuff fascinates me, I could sit and read a thread like this all day.

I've always been intrigued by the 1909 Scottish Cup Final where there was a riot and a bonfire on the pitch!  Sectarianism wasn't really a thing at this point either.

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They had to reconstruct the stadium for the Scotland England game the next year.

Mob rule. A bonfire on the pitch. A two-hour riot, and the trophy withheld. Even by Old Firm standards, the 1909 Scottish Cup final was bedlam.

The sides couldn't be separated in 90 minutes and remained deadlocked following a replay, after which all hell broke loose at Hampden Park.

It was an unprecedented act of hooliganism in Scottish football that left scores of people injured.

Here, Richard McBrearty, the curator of the Scottish Football Museum at Hampden, recounts one of the most unsavoury episodes in the game's history.

Roots of Old Firm rivalry

The two clubs were starting to emerge as the giants we know them as today. The term 'Old Firm' actually comes from this early 20th century period as Rangers and Celtic were now box-office attractions. They were beginning to stand out because they had the biggest crowds, the best players and were on the cusp of dominating Scottish football.

They were also playing in finals on a regular basis so they were making money, particularly when facing each other. The "firm" relates to being like a business and the "old" clubs were rising again to make more money.

But the religious element of the rivalry hadn't developed to a great extent yet. So sectarianism wasn't a key factor on this occasion. Also, there was no segregation - the fans were mixed together. You would have a big number of supporters from other clubs because the cup final and Scotland v England were the two biggest events that came to Glasgow.

So it wasn't two sets of fans fighting each other and carnage ensuing - it was basically a mob fighting the authorities because they felt they were getting ripped off. It was mob rule.

Confusion turns to carnage

The first game was a close affair, with Rangers winning 2-1 late on and then an own goal forcing the replay. The second, with 60,000 fans packed inside Hampden, ended 1-1. It was the first time a replay had been drawn. And that's when confusion led to chaos.

The rules were simple - another replay was to be held. But for whatever reason, the crowd believed it was going to be played to a finish.

The players were unsure, too. Crucially, they hung back at the end of the 90 minutes. They were milling around and didn't know if they were to play on. It was only when the referee left the pitch that they eventually departed and the officials came out to remove the corner flags. That's when the crowd realised the game was finished.

This riot was completely unprecedented. And it really wasn't expected. There wasn't a large police presence at the game and they were simply overwhelmed.

Thousands of incensed fans surged on to the pitch quite quickly. There were scuffles, the police responded, and then it just kicked off. Carnage. And it lasted for two hours, which is quite incredible.

The police called for reinforcements. But even then they just didn't have the numbers to quell thousands of fans. They were basically fighting battles in lots of different areas on and around the pitch.

The crowd went from attacking the police to destroying elements of the stadium. They ripped up the pitch, tore down the goals and set them on fire. The fencing around the track and the pay boxes - old-fashioned turnstiles - were destroyed and burned as well.

The fire brigade turned up and got pelted with stones and bottles. They pulled out the hoses to try to douse the fires, but the rioters grabbed the hoses and the first one got thrown on a bonfire on the pitch. The rest were cut so they couldn't be used.

 

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1 hour ago, Scott Steiner said:

This sort of stuff fascinates me, I could sit and read a thread like this all day.

I've always been intrigued by the 1909 Scottish Cup Final where there was a riot and a bonfire on the pitch!  Sectarianism wasn't really a thing at this point either.

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1-63.jpg


Bad enough for 10 headlines...

                   1909041793.jpg
1909041711.jpg

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Very interesting to read about the 1909 Hampden Riot. I find the society aspect of football as interesting as the results.  And good to get contemporary accounts.  Often we see things from days gone bye through our modern eyes.  From what I have read in other places Celtic and Rangers were quite friendly in early days. It was a few years after this event before Rangers adopted their "No Catholic" policy.  So no segregation in those days? When I started taking interest in Football in the late 50's /early 60's the Old Firm game was unique I think in having segregated crowds. The London media often commented on this , and I remember reading a report of a Canadian journalist visiting Glasgow who went to a New Year derby. He stated how the crowd had a "smile on half its face" when a goal was scored. My father started going to football in Glasgow late 20's, early 30's. Old Firm segregation had been established by then. He said that as far he was aware the segregation was not imposed by authorities but had been adopted by the fans themselves. I have never been able to find out if that was indeed the case, and if so why each set of fans chose the end of the ground they did. Doubt if there is anybody still around from those days but are there any Celtic or Rangers fans who have any knowledge of this?

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On 19/11/2021 at 21:45, Dundee Hibernian said:

Wonder what colours Thirds were wearing that day: guessing at sky blue and claret to contrast Hearts' white with maroon candy stipes, but can't see anything mentioned in match reports.

Thirds wore a gold shirt that day - and Jocky Robertson did indeed wear a Hearts shirt under his goalkeepers jersey

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the-results-of-the-final-draw-of-the-197

My earliest hazy football memories are of the hoo-ha around the 1974 World Cup. But one thing I never realised until recently was that Scotland were actually drawn in a five team group, with Spain and Yugoslavia having to play off several weeks after the draw was made.

I wonder if that is unprecedented? However it will definitely happen again next year as the draw for Qatar 22 takes place in April, with the inter-confederation play-offs not scheduled until June.

 

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2 hours ago, Lurkst said:

My earliest hazy football memories are of the hoo-ha around the 1974 World Cup. But one thing I never realised until recently was that Scotland were actually drawn in a five team group, with Spain and Yugoslavia having to play off several weeks after the draw was made.

I wonder if that is unprecedented? However it will definitely happen again next year as the draw for Qatar 22 takes place in April, with the inter-confederation play-offs not scheduled until June.

"Dead heat" in their qualifying group and played-off (in Frankfurt) in February.

Sweden & Austria similiar but played-off (in Gelsenkirchen) in November.


Mexico & USA played-off (in Rome) only 3 days before Italy 1934 began. Effectively part of finals tournament (which was knockout).


EDIT: Also must have happened in 1954... it had 4 groups of 4 but just 2 group ties (seeds v unseeds). Turkey beat Spain on 'lots' after 3 ties, and adopted their seeding.

EDIT AGAIN: Turkey had a most remarkable campaign in 1954... Their qualifying group only had 2 nations - Spain and themselves. They lost 4-1 in Madrid but somehow won 1-0 in Istanbul. As it was technically a group not a knockout tie, and as there were no tiebreakers apart from points, meant a 3rd tie playoff in Rome. They somehow drew 2-2 aet and qualified when a stadium workers lad drew lots. By now finals tournament in Switzerland had been drawn, and in Group C we find Hungary and Turkey (in lieu of Spain) seeded with West Germany and South Korea unseeded. Hungary thrashed both West Germany and South Korea. West Germany thrashed Turkey, who thrashed South Korea. Were no Hungary v Turkey or West Germany v South Korea matches. Again no tiebreakers so West Germany and Turkey on 2pts had to playoff for QFs place... Turkey thrashed again.

Edited by HibeeJibee
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2 hours ago, Lurkst said:

the-results-of-the-final-draw-of-the-197

My earliest hazy football memories are of the hoo-ha around the 1974 World Cup. But one thing I never realised until recently was that Scotland were actually drawn in a five team group, with Spain and Yugoslavia having to play off several weeks after the draw was made.

I wonder if that is unprecedented? However it will definitely happen again next year as the draw for Qatar 22 takes place in April, with the inter-confederation play-offs not scheduled until June.

 

I believe the Spain vs Yugoslavia play-off was shown live on the ITV network with Hugh Johns on mic duties...

 

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1 hour ago, HibeeJibee said:

"Dead heat" in their qualifying group and played-off (in Frankfurt) in February.

Sweden & Austria similiar but played-off (in Gelsenkirchen) in November.


Mexico & USA played-off (in Rome) only 3 days before Italy 1934 began. Effectively part of finals tournament (which was knockout).


EDIT: Also must have happened in 1954... it had 4 groups of 4 but just 2 group ties (seeds v unseeds). Turkey beat Spain on 'lots' after 3 ties, and adopted their seeding.

EDIT AGAIN: Turkey had a most remarkable campaign in 1954... Their qualifying group only had 2 nations - Spain and themselves. They lost 4-1 in Madrid but somehow won 1-0 in Istanbul. As it was technically a group not a knockout tie, and as there were no tiebreakers apart from points, meant a 3rd tie playoff in Rome. They somehow drew 2-2 aet and qualified when a stadium workers lad drew lots. By now finals tournament in Switzerland had been drawn, and in Group C we find Hungary and Turkey (in lieu of Spain) seeded with West Germany and South Korea unseeded. Hungary thrashed both West Germany and South Korea. West Germany thrashed Turkey, who thrashed South Korea. Were no Hungary v Turkey or West Germany v South Korea matches. Again no tiebreakers so West Germany and Turkey on 2pts had to playoff for QFs place... Turkey thrashed again.

Don’t forget Scotland had to play-off against Czechoslovakia in 1961 after both ended up with 3:wins out of 4 and goal average didn’t count. Scotland lost 0-4 in Bratislava but won 3-2 at Hampden. The play-off was in Brussels and the Czechs won 4-2 aet. Czechoslovakia lost to Brazil in the 1962 Final.

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, AlbaNZ said:

Very interesting to read about the 1909 Hampden Riot. I find the society aspect of football as interesting as the results.  And good to get contemporary accounts.  Often we see things from days gone bye through our modern eyes.  From what I have read in other places Celtic and Rangers were quite friendly in early days. It was a few years after this event before Rangers adopted their "No Catholic" policy.  So no segregation in those days? When I started taking interest in Football in the late 50's /early 60's the Old Firm game was unique I think in having segregated crowds. The London media often commented on this , and I remember reading a report of a Canadian journalist visiting Glasgow who went to a New Year derby. He stated how the crowd had a "smile on half its face" when a goal was scored. My father started going to football in Glasgow late 20's, early 30's. Old Firm segregation had been established by then. He said that as far he was aware the segregation was not imposed by authorities but had been adopted by the fans themselves. I have never been able to find out if that was indeed the case, and if so why each set of fans chose the end of the ground they did. Doubt if there is anybody still around from those days but are there any Celtic or Rangers fans who have any knowledge of this?

At the very real danger of provoking a pointless debate on the matter, as I recall the change from rivalry between the two rich Glasgow clubs changed to utter hatred, bigotry and prejudice was initiated by the Church of Scotland in a report during the 1920s.  Something along the lines of "don't employ Catholics" (so they didn't), treat members of other religions as below "us" (which they did) and so on. Don't think they ever apologised for that either, thus ensuring it's continuation in the minds of many. (Despite the fact that none of them attend any religious activity either side of the great divide).

Please fell free to correct this (briefly) and then get back to the whole point of the thread.

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Century ago tonight Hearts, Hibs, Leith and St Bernards instituted an emergency Edinburgh Rent Relief Fund Cup:

1921113001.jpg

Wed 07 Dec 1921     SF     Heart of Midlothian 2-1 St Bernards     (5,000)     (£165 10s)
Wed 14 Dec 1921     SF     Hibernian 7-0 Leith Athletic


Regretably the Final at Tynecastle was postponed by bad weather... then delayed 5 months 😆:

Wed 10 May 1922     Fin     Heart of Midlothian 0-1 Hibernian     (6,000)      (£250)

Another was staged 1yr later
:

Tue 15 May 1923     Fin     Heart of Midlothian 2-1 Hibernian     (5,000)     (£220 9s)



Glasgow had established an equivalent tournament the previous month:

Tue 15 Nov 1921     R1     Partick Thistle 4-2 Clyde     (5,000)    (£255 15s)
Tue 22 Nov 1921     R1     Queen's Park 2-3 Rangers     (7,000)     (£270)

Tue 29 Nov 1921     SF     Celtic 2-1 Third Lanark     (6,000)

Tue 06 Dec 1921     SF     Rangers 2-0 Partick Thistle     (10,000)     (£536)

Tue 13 Dec 1921     Fin     Rangers 2-0 Celtic     (25,000 at Hampden)




SFA donated £1,000 to support Glasgow's tournament... but by 14 votes to 8 a proposed contribution of £500 for Edinburgh was reduced to £105 and then nothing 🤨.

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39 minutes ago, HibeeJibee said:

Century ago tonight Hearts, Hibs, Leith and St Bernards instituted an emergency Edinburgh Rent Relief Fund Cup:

1921113001.jpg

Wed 07 Dec 1921     SF     Heart of Midlothian 2-1 St Bernards     (5,000)     (£165 10s)
Wed 14 Dec 1921     SF     Hibernian 7-0 Leith Athletic


Regretably the Final at Tynecastle was postponed by bad weather... then delayed 5 months 😆:

Wed 10 May 1922     Fin     Heart of Midlothian 0-1 Hibernian     (6,000)      (£250)

Another was staged 1yr later
:

Tue 15 May 1923     Fin     Heart of Midlothian 2-1 Hibernian     (5,000)     (£220 9s)



Glasgow had established an equivalent tournament the previous month:

Tue 15 Nov 1921     R1     Partick Thistle 4-2 Clyde     (5,000)    (£255 15s)
Tue 22 Nov 1921     R1     Queen's Park 2-3 Rangers     (7,000)     (£270)

Tue 29 Nov 1921     SF     Celtic 2-1 Third Lanark     (6,000)

Tue 06 Dec 1921     SF     Rangers 2-0 Partick Thistle     (10,000)     (£536)

Tue 13 Dec 1921     Fin     Rangers 2-0 Celtic     (25,000 at Hampden)




SFA donated £1,000 to support Glasgow's tournament... but by 14 votes to 8 a proposed contribution of £500 for Edinburgh was reduced to £105 and then nothing 🤨.

In 1915 there was a rent strike in Glasgow when landlords took advantage of an influx of shipyard workers for the war effort and the fact that many Glasgow men were fighting at the Front to bully the women into accepting a 25% increase.

Led by Mary Barbour the women succeeded in forcing the Government to pass rent restriction laws for the duration.

Presumably when the soldiers came home the rent restriction laws were scrapped, hence the need for charity matches.

St Bernards and Leith Athletic themselves were in a bit of a state at the end of World War 1. The Gymnasium pitch had been damaged by use as a vehicle depot and Leith were semi-nomads on the lookout for suitable accommodation.

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On 22/11/2021 at 15:53, Drew Brees said:

Mounted police keep an eye on the crowds at the Edinburgh derby in January 1950 at Easter Road. A record attendance of more than 65,000 fans saw Hearts beat Hibs by two goals to one.

B3AD7559-F01A-4DF6-89AA-8EE0DC9D4B02.jpeg

 

Imagine the boys down the front having to look up at the horses bollocks, thinking, " I hope it doesn't chose this time to have a shite".

The horses and polis must have looked HUGE from down there.

 

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