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DA Baracus

'Busy lives'

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As a society, we're getting lazier.

Plenty of exceptions obviously but the technology in our lives has led to us being physically more sedate and mentally more 'in our head' (horrible way to put it but hopefully you get my point).

We think and worry about peripheral stuff way, way more than we should.

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6 hours ago, pandarilla said:



We think and worry about peripheral stuff way, way more than we should.
 

So true. 

 

Edited by Tony Ferrino

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Might be down to how we define busy - I'm busy breathing 24/7.

Some of the things people are mentioning as part of their 'busy' lives are things they choose to do - fair enough but then i disagree we are busier than our predecessors as we all only have/had 24 hours in a day.

It's likely just another thing that every generation thinks.

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11 hours ago, pandarilla said:

As a society, we're getting lazier.

Plenty of exceptions obviously but the technology in our lives has led to us being physically more sedate and mentally more 'in our head' (horrible way to put it but hopefully you get my point).

We think and worry about peripheral stuff way, way more than we should.
 

Do we worry more about peripheral stuff more than people did 20/30 years ago? 

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4 minutes ago, throbber said:

Do we worry more about peripheral stuff more than people did 20/30 years ago? 

Do we worry more now than we did 30 years ago?  There's something else to worry about.

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Do we worry more about peripheral stuff more than people did 20/30 years ago? 

Maybe...but i doubt it.

Anyway, surely what we worry about is not time sensitive - it's more about what stage in life we are at? I suspect a 60 year-old worries less than they did when they were 40, but a 40 year-old worries more than they did when they were 20.

20 years isn't really enough time to judge social changes IMO - I'd say 30/40 timeframe.

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Do we worry more about peripheral stuff more than people did 20/30 years ago? 


Absolutely.

Image. Profiles. Social media. Look at me world I'm so cool.

(Again plenty of exceptions but I don't think there's any doubt the answer you your question is yes.)

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1 hour ago, The DA said:

Do we worry more now than we did 30 years ago?  There's something else to worry about.

You know, I reckon we do. I remember most people having problems of some sort just like they have today, but more often than not putting them to one side and just getting on with it if they were at all capable of doing so.

There seems more of a tendency to keep your problems front and centre now - to almost wallow in them and let them define you. We're more self analytical and narcissistic than we've maybe ever been, and you'll probably find those claiming to lead the busiest lives are actually the ones most likely to be doing f**k all.

Just like at work.

Edited by Hillonearth

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14 hours ago, pandarilla said:

As a society, we're getting lazier.

Plenty of exceptions obviously but the technology in our lives has led to us being physically more sedate and mentally more 'in our head' (horrible way to put it but hopefully you get my point).

We think and worry about peripheral stuff way, way more than we should.
 

If 1 more person says to me they do online shopping (as in Tesco, Asda etc) because they "don't have time to go to the supermarket" instead of the truth that they're a lazy c**t, I shall break out my AK47.

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If 1 more person says to me they do online shopping (as in Tesco, Asda etc) because they "don't have time to go to the supermarket" instead of the truth that they're a lazy c**t, I shall break out my AK47.


I used to deliver for asda when I was at uni and the amount of times there would be items replaced with ridiculous swaps was unbelievable such as chicken fillets instead of strawberries or Flour instead of flowers.

You would never get more than 2 days shelf life on most of the fresh products and the vans were mouldy due to the milk bursting constantly and they didn't have the "budget" to get them cleaned once a week even.

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1 hour ago, booj1893 said:

 


I used to deliver for asda when I was at uni and the amount of times there would be items replaced with ridiculous swaps was unbelievable such as chicken fillets instead of strawberries or Flour instead of flowers.

You would never get more than 2 days shelf life on most of the fresh products and the vans were mouldy due to the milk bursting constantly and they didn't have the "budget" to get them cleaned once a week even.

 

Good enough for the lazy c***s.

What were Asdas profits in those days of penny pinching?

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Pretty sure at my age my dad was just as busy, working full time and raising a family...just a different busy due to respective life choices on both our parts.

Aye, that's what he wants you to believe.

 

There seems more of a tendency to keep your problems front and centre now - to almost wallow in them and let them define you.

 

Ah, the classic sad face or "sigh" FB update fishing for "what's up h*n?"s.

 

I have one particular acquaintance who has admittedly had an exceptionally rough couple of years, juggling a resubmitted PhD with kids whilst close family members are dying left, right and centre. However, she evidently wants to be defined as some unfortunate trooper by constantly telling the world all about her woes through FB. Irks me somewhat even though I still have massive respect for her. She's by no means the only one at it.

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5 minutes ago, Melanius Mullarkey said:

My sister is always harping on about her life being soooooooooo busy. She lives in London so life must automatically be sooooooooo busy down there.

My other sister does not stay in London and is a lazy boot.

Correlation?

Your family is full of arseholes.

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6 minutes ago, Melanius Mullarkey said:

My sister is always harping on about her life being soooooooooo busy. She lives in London so life must automatically be sooooooooo busy down there.

My other sister does not stay in London and is a lazy boot.

Correlation?

I was down in London for work a few weeks ago and it definitely has it's own challenges.  I was staying in a hotel relatively close to where I was working but the guys in the office I was working in all had two hour commutes both ways.  That would definitely cut down on your free time.  I get annoyed when I have to drive longer than twenty minutes to work up here.

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3 hours ago, booj1893 said:

 


I used to deliver for asda when I was at uni and the amount of times there would be items replaced with ridiculous swaps was unbelievable such as chicken fillets instead of strawberries or Flour instead of flowers.

You would never get more than 2 days shelf life on most of the fresh products and the vans were mouldy due to the milk bursting constantly and they didn't have the "budget" to get them cleaned once a week even.

 

Is this actually true? I was an online shopper in Sainsburys for a bit, and if you did anything like that you'd be telt very quickly, and if it continued you'd be fired very quickly. You had to scan everything so the managers could always review on the system what folk had done, and shit like that would get flagged up right away. Plus as soon as the customer complains, you'd be in trouble, as every shop could be traced back to who did it (since you have to sign in to the scanners).

The swaps we made were always a similar product (e.g. if the bread they wanted wasn't there we'd swap it for the closest match and so on, and if there wasn't a similar product we simply didn't give a swap a the customer would be refunded for that item). 

Of course I have no idea how Asda worked with this, so perhaps shit like that did go on.

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19 minutes ago, Melanius Mullarkey said:

 


Indeed London can be a challenge but it is a choice for a lot of people and I don't class commuting as being part of a busy life. My sister for example is a freelance muso so can choose when and where to work so her "oooh so busy" shite won't wash with me.

In essence, as Monsieur Skidmarks says above, my family are full or arse holes.

 

She's a busker on the tube, isnt she?

images-2.jpg

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4 hours ago, Hedgecutter said:

Ah, the classic sad face or "sigh" FB update fishing for "what's up h*n?"s.

I have one particular acquaintance who has admittedly had an exceptionally rough couple of years, juggling a resubmitted PhD with kids whilst close family members are dying left, right and centre. However, she evidently wants to be defined as some unfortunate trooper by constantly telling the world all about her woes through FB. Irks me somewhat even though I still have massive respect for her. She's by no means the only one at it.

When I was typing that I was specifically thinking of a guy I know – he’s (or more accurately perhaps he WAS) a cracking guy in real life, but unfortunately social media has been the undoing of him, as he seems to spend a disproportionate time on there documenting every mishap and slight that life offers him, regularly taking online hissy fits if he fails to garner the attention he believes he warrants.

Worst of it is he's not of of those cliched millennials who we're led to believe are the only ones obsessed with cataloguing the "uniqueness" of their essentially mundane experiences - he's in his forties.

Edited by Hillonearth

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Is this actually true? I was an online shopper in Sainsburys for a bit, and if you did anything like that you'd be telt very quickly, and if it continued you'd be fired very quickly. You had to scan everything so the managers could always review on the system what folk had done, and shit like that would get flagged up right away. Plus as soon as the customer complains, you'd be in trouble, as every shop could be traced back to who did it (since you have to sign in to the scanners).
The swaps we made were always a similar product (e.g. if the bread they wanted wasn't there we'd swap it for the closest match and so on, and if there wasn't a similar product we simply didn't give a swap a the customer would be refunded for that item). 
Of course I have no idea how Asda worked with this, so perhaps shit like that did go on.

I've used asda online for years now and have to say they've been decent with subs. Only problem was ordering a bottle of single malt once and it disappeared. The driver was sound about it and admitted that during busy times they leave out orders and if you know where to look it's a free for all. Won't order anything over £5 in value now even though I got a refund.

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