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It's interesting, I didn't see that ever happening in that role when I was doing it, and I don't disagree with your last point.
I'm desperate to get back to the office, tbh. I hate working from home, I feel like I get next to nothing done, and the house feels cramped with my work stuff set up here. I'll be looking to be one of the first lot back in the building in my team.


I’m just annoyed my last meal from the canteen was spring rolls and chips because they ran out of fish before I got to it.

I’d happily accept a rota where it was split, I know there’s some people in the department who are quite keen to get back and others who want to stay at home. When my girlfriend goes back to work, which we’re both hoping will be soon it’ll be easier for me with the homeworking.

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We got the offer of volunteering to go back to work in the office.  Previously I had thought I would be one of the first to put my name down but everyone else in the team swiftly responded with a ‘thanks, but no thanks.’  There seemed to be no point in swapping wfh for sitting in the office on my own so sent the same.  Now that I escaped from the mother in law’s I’m not in quite the same rush to get back.

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All the things she said, running through my head, while reading this thread.

FTFY

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aye but for a variety of reasons employers in a lot of sectors don't typically hire and fire at rapid pace (Tory wet dream). Everyone knows there are busy periods and slack periods through the year & companies who display absolutely no care or loyalty to their staff by doing the above don't attract productive workers.
Exactly, I worked for a good employer once who expected you to work seven days a week but when work ran out you were sent home. Turned up for a shift several times to be told to head home after an hour.
Also hardly ever had to deal with the supervisor or management and they were okay with surfing unless there was a visit on site.
Another firm had people employed to simply harass and annoy staff and had hooters going off for break plus signing in and out toilets.

One company had an engaged happy workforce and the other place was horrible and people would vandalise stuff and it attracted the worst type of people who were there because there was nothing else.

The only change in productivity was down to how the employees were treated. The Victorian era is over and any firm that acts this way will eventually fail.

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2 hours ago, D.A.F.C said:

Exactly, I worked for a good employer once who expected you to work seven days a week but when work ran out you were sent home. Turned up for a shift several times to be told to head home after an hour.
Also hardly ever had to deal with the supervisor or management and they were okay with surfing unless there was a visit on site.
Another firm had people employed to simply harass and annoy staff and had hooters going off for break plus signing in and out toilets.

One company had an engaged happy workforce and the other place was horrible and people would vandalise stuff and it attracted the worst type of people who were there because there was nothing else.

The only change in productivity was down to how the employees were treated. The Victorian era is over and any firm that acts this way will eventually fail.

I think you'll find the Victorian era is coming back - food banks, zero hours contracts, no sick pay, waiting 5-7 weeks for Social Security payments when living from weekly pay day to weekly pay day, commission only employment. 

Whether the current crisis exacerbates or mitigates the situation time will tell.

Edited by Jacksgranda
sllepnig

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13 hours ago, die hard doonhamer said:

It's interesting, I didn't see that ever happening in that role when I was doing it, and I don't disagree with your last point.

I'm desperate to get back to the office, tbh. I hate working from home, I feel like I get next to nothing done, and the house feels cramped with my work stuff set up here. I'll be looking to be one of the first lot back in the building in my team.

 

^^^ you

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1 hour ago, Jacksgranda said:

I think you'll find the Victorian era is coming back - food banks, zero hours contracts, no sick pay, waiting 5-7 weeks for Social Secirity payments when living from weekly pay day to weekly pay day, commission only employment. 

Whether the current crisis exacerbates or mitigates the situation time will tell.

This will be down to whether the GBP finally decide they've had enough and realise that if there's a 99% group and a 1% group, or even close, there's one side with a massive numerical advantage.

If there's one lesson to be learned from the last couple of months, it is this - we can bimble along quite happily* without bankers, footballers and movie stars. Binmen, cleaners and checkout girls, not so much.

If there's two - and this thread clearly demonstrates this - the majority of organisations appear to have at least one layer of superfluous management.

*Relatively speaking.

Edited by WhiteRoseKillie

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9 minutes ago, WhiteRoseKillie said:

This will be down to whether the GBP finally decide they've had enough and realise that if there's a 99% group and a 1% group, or even close, there's one side with a massive numerical advantage.

If there's one lesson to be learned from the last couple of months, it is this - we can bimble along quite happily* without bankers, footballers and movie stars. Binmen, cleaners and checkout girls, not so much.

If there's two - and this thread clearly demonstrates this - the majority of organisations appear to have at least one layer of superfluous management.

*Relatively speaking.

Not so sure about that - unless you mean the CEOs and boards of directors. Someone has tp process the mortgage holidays/extensions & co.

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5 hours ago, Turkmenbashi said:

My work has asked me to book out my annual leave for the rest of the year, with none getting carried over til next year. Only actually booked two days so far this year.

Ditto.

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4 hours ago, Alert Mongoose said:

We got the offer of volunteering to go back to work in the office.  Previously I had thought I would be one of the first to put my name down but everyone else in the team swiftly responded with a ‘thanks, but no thanks.’  There seemed to be no point in swapping wfh for sitting in the office on my own so sent the same.  Now that I escaped from the mother in law’s I’m not in quite the same rush to get back.

Eighty percent of my work I could do from home. I work for for the Civil Service and I could technically work 40 days per year off on Flexi leave. What happens to this under WFM? Additionally, the rules regarding 'being available' for work are vague and open to interpretation. If a unionised environment like the CS hasn't resolved this it must be a lot worse in the private sector.

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My missus was just telling me at lunchtime she'd been on an hour's phone call with her immediate boss - he's one of those guys who operates by seemingly aimlessly wandering round the building, talking to people face to face and coming back with a solution. That's been taken away from him and he doesn't seem to be able to do things any other way...he also seems to be in denial, insisting everything will be back to the way it was before in a few weeks' time.

Earlier this week I'd been privy to the building recall plans though which are pretty unquivocal; in short we won't be back in any numbers for the foreseeable and will only be in the office if there's a specific task that's demonstrably impossible to carry out remotely - even then strictly for the duration of that task and no longer. Personal preferences of how managers prefer things done don't come into it.

She genuinely thinks once all this is spelled out to him out he'll just say f**k it and resign.

 

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9 hours ago, KnightswoodBear said:

I work for a large telecommunications firm and over the last 2 or 3 years they've had a massive clampdown on people working from home.  They had people who were badged as homeworkers that they've taken that away from them and moved them into hub offices or in some cases, they've had to find other employment if they don't want to do that.  The unions have argued that for many there is no barrier to them doing their jobs effectively at home.

Now, we've got a huge percentage of the companies employees working from home and we're being told what a great job everyone is doing whilst wfh.  It's going to be interesting to see what their approach will be once they start saying we can go back into the office.

Were they perceived to be at it?

We had started a day a week WFH and I could pick out the chancers at 100 paces. People who could barely manage a few hours miraculously doing 12 hour days, then complaining if they were asked what they were doing.

We're getting away with murder just now as it's about safety, but you can see from any stats return who is doing what.

If WFH is expanded I'd have visiting managers who can kick in the door and drag you out of bed.

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I just tweeted this and thought it'd be a decent thought in here.

There is a right few chancers in my work. the type who spend all day walking about "problem solving" and "helping". I wonder how they spin that working from home.

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My work is dead set against us working from home and I get it we need to work in teams to get stuff done. I much prefer face to face rather then over zoom. But at least I can work normally through this.

The wife’s work, civil servants, are a bunch of work shy lazy, lying b*****ds. 1 guy refused to answer his phone for 2 weeks so no one could speak to him. He refused to answer the door when the courier turn up with his laptop but finally they got him after 3 weeks of trying. He is now claiming he is working 15 hour days but when asked to show what he’s been working on he just waffles.

But of course he’s a civil servant so f**k all will happen to him.

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I just tweeted this and thought it'd be a decent thought in here.

There is a right few chancers in my work. the type who spend all day walking about "problem solving" and "helping". I wonder how they spin that working from home.

They arrange pointless teleconferences to keep checking non existent progress on things that won't progress until lockdown is substantially lifted.

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1 hour ago, steelmen said:

My work is dead set against us working from home and I get it we need to work in teams to get stuff done. I much prefer face to face rather then over zoom. But at least I can work normally through this.

The wife’s work, civil servants, are a bunch of work shy lazy, lying b*****ds. 1 guy refused to answer his phone for 2 weeks so no one could speak to him. He refused to answer the door when the courier turn up with his laptop but finally they got him after 3 weeks of trying. He is now claiming he is working 15 hour days but when asked to show what he’s been working on he just waffles.

But of course he’s a civil servant so f**k all will happen to him.

What you're describing is simply bad/poor management. Not unique to the CS I'd imagine. As for your opinion of us lazy, lying Civil Servant bast**ds, good luck with your first shift in a DWP office!

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Convinced the image of the public sector as full of workshy lazy b*****ds comes from people who've never been in a unionised workforce & view working flat out all day under the stern gaze of a boss as normal. Hardly surprising when the papers are full of the usual militant unions chat about teachers.

Edited by MixuFixit

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Convinced the image of the public sector as full of workshy lazy b*****ds comes from tories and shitebags


Fixed

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2 minutes ago, Bairnardo said:


 

 


Fixed

 

Amen brother. To me unionisation is the big thing. When the Tories come to power it's the first thing they attack. CS unions are pretty weak but far far better than not having them at all. They introduced a rule that the union must  get over 50% of actual union members before the vote is legal (Scottish referendum 1979, anyone!) but obviously that doesn't apply to them and Johnson's 'landslide' election victory.

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6 minutes ago, I am Partacus said:

Amen brother. To me unionisation is the big thing. When the Tories come to power it's the first thing they attack. CS unions are pretty weak but far far better than not having them at all. They introduced a rule that the union must  get over 50% of actual union members before the vote is legal (Scottish referendum 1979, anyone!) but obviously that doesn't apply to them and Johnson's 'landslide' election victory.

Or Brexit - 38% voted to come out.

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