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RedRob72

P&B Bird Watch

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Regarding greenfinches, they were very common but it seems that they have suffered badly due to disease:-

https://www.bto.org/our-science/projects/gbw/gardens-wildlife/garden-birds/disease/trichomonosis

I know my folks in the highlands have seen sick siskins and other finches in the last few years due to this.

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This picture is from Google because I couldn't get close enough with my phone before I scared him off but...

We had one of these boys at the birdbath this morning. He's a Western Tanager and as central Colorado is at the far north of their range, we don't see them often. They remind me of a Tequila Sunrise.

1*RfbX4rUwXbj3amFIiOHOJg.jpeg

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Was going to cut back a couple of bushes in the front garden this afternoon until I heard sounds coming from one of them...it can wait a few weeks...

 

20200524_182853.jpg

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These pics are 2 years old this week. My mate found some tawnies nesting in a tree so I went along with him and got some shots. They're round about lockdown distance from my house but haven't got around to looking this year. These are about 40 yards away with a 600mm and a bit of Lightroom.

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Counted 10 magpies in the bit next to the hoose earlier. A few young ones in amongst them. What a racket.

On the plus side they set about one of the squirrels which was nice.

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22 minutes ago, HeartsOfficialMoaner said:

Never got a photo but saw a young crow with a cross bill. I take it they don't live long. They must find it hard to pick up food.

not massively uncommon, as it happens - and it doesn't spell an early death sentence either; it's believed to be an inherited condition, so chances are that herbert will at least live long enough to breed, if not last to a ripe old age (some 'normal' crows can reach 15 !); i didn't realise until recently that bird's beaks 'wear out' at the pointy end with normal use and grow constantly, so if it has to eat in a peculiar manner chances are the deformity will get worse and - because it cannot then preen itself properly - it'll get mite infestations which won't increase its chances of living to any reasonable sort of age

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23 minutes ago, Herman Hessian said:

not massively uncommon, as it happens - and it doesn't spell an early death sentence either; it's believed to be an inherited condition, so chances are that herbert will at least live long enough to breed, if not last to a ripe old age (some 'normal' crows can reach 15 !); i didn't realise until recently that bird's beaks 'wear out' at the pointy end with normal use and grow constantly, so if it has to eat in a peculiar manner chances are the deformity will get worse and - because it cannot then preen itself properly - it'll get mite infestations which won't increase its chances of living to any reasonable sort of age

I never knew that. First time I'e seen one. Looked like there was an old bird looking over it but maybe not, I might have just been putting 2 and 2 together.  I was in a wooded area and they were the only 2 around. 

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Saw a couple of seagulls chasing a kite which had taken some poor wee rodent when I was on the way home from a walk this evening. Was like a dog fight with a lot of swooping, thermal rising and dodging. Tremendous entertainment

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Out for a walk this evening and found a Green Woodpeckers nest. Chicks were making some racket when a parent arrived with food.

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This wee guy smacked into our front window this morning but seems to be coming round. Thinking it's a juvenile greenfinch?

Will give it a wee while before punting back outside as the resident magpie family are hanging about.

20200603_065722.jpg

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We're now getting multiple goldfinches on our sunflower heart feeder. I'd go as far as to say they are now the most common small garden bird I'm getting at the moment. 

We moved house 6 years ago but only went half a mile or so from old place. We used to get loads of greenfinches and siskins in previous garden but not a single one here. 

2020-04-25_09-03-49.jpg

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Swannie ponds have cracking cygnets just now. Getting quite big.

CABF8BA4-A56B-4DC1-9EE6-80CCFF3BF9D7.jpeg.27901497e1e30238d64c32cbe3c6fc9d.jpeg
 

Plus some duck things (black with a white bit on the head) have built a mid-pond nest.

00C0C64A-3023-43ED-AE75-FA06760174F5.jpeg.467b625e150848d681de05869c79e110.jpeg

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Swannie ponds have cracking cygnets just now. Getting quite big.
CABF8BA4-A56B-4DC1-9EE6-80CCFF3BF9D7.jpeg.27901497e1e30238d64c32cbe3c6fc9d.jpeg
 
Plus some duck things (black with a white bit on the head) have built a mid-pond nest.
00C0C64A-3023-43ED-AE75-FA06760174F5.jpeg.467b625e150848d681de05869c79e110.jpeg

Coots

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Was a busy day for birds out our back. 

First a young starling came down and stayed for hours picking aphids off the sweet pea. Then a wren stopped by. A wood pigeon some blue tits and a load of sparrows.

There are jackdaws nesting in the neighbours chimneys but anytime they try to land on my bird feeder magpies come out of nowhere and chase them off. p***ks

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I've spent a lot of time in the country in my life and last week was the first time I had seen a Tree-creeper!

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Was out the other night as I was told there was a fox that hung about the park & ride. Saw this Kestrel instead.

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An old name for the kestrel is the "windfucker".

Should have kept that- "Windfucker Lager" has a certain ring to it!

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On 07/06/2020 at 11:39, Fife Saint said:

I've spent a lot of time in the country in my life and last week was the first time I had seen a Tree-creeper!

They're wee buggers to see - they're so well camouflaged sometimes all you'll see is a bit of movement on a tree trunk that helps you zero in on it. I remember sitting at a pub table under a canopy of trees in central Amsterdam when I saw one no more than six or seven feet away from me...thing must have been there the whole time and I hadn't noticed.

Brucie bonus armchair tick when I got home and realised what I'd seen had been a short-toed treecreeper, an almost indistinguishable separate species...the distribution of the common treecreeper we get in the UK  stops short of the Channel for some reason, so any you see in the low countries are stick-ons for short-toed.

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