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      Pie and Bovril Nostalgia Mobile Phone Cases!   12/09/18

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Jimboyjones1976

Favourite quirks of Scottish stadiums.

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10 minutes ago, Stellaboz said:

A grand terrace, miss the old ground a lot.

Was a good away end that.

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East End used to have big pylons like that. You can see a couple of them in the photo below, alongside one of their replacements. The old ones were removed and replaced when the stadium was (sadly) made all seater in the late 90s.
Eep23.JPG.a94f54d51f7cd44d53f47d2b4a95af20.JPG
Do you have any photos of a similar vintage showing the seated North Stand and the old covered West Terrace that curved round to join it?

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6 hours ago, Salvo Montalbano said:
8 hours ago, DA Baracus said:
East End used to have big pylons like that. You can see a couple of them in the photo below, alongside one of their replacements. The old ones were removed and replaced when the stadium was (sadly) made all seater in the late 90s.
Eep23.JPG.a94f54d51f7cd44d53f47d2b4a95af20.JPG

Do you have any photos of a similar vintage showing the seated North Stand and the old covered West Terrace that curved round to join it?

Eep1-1.JPG.f5ba56872c31bfd0087bf911c23bf538.JPG

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On 09/04/2019 at 09:41, TheScarf said:

Found this picture of the old Bayview in Methil.  This was the terrace I stood on as a 13 year old in August 1998 to watch the veteran Duncan Shearer and the young Martin Bavidge put East Fife to the sword in a 5-1 victory.

Image result for old bayview methil

4 months later we were back in Methil at New Bayview to see East Fife beat us 3-2 with absolute mentalist Paul Cherry getting sent off for the 165th time in his career.

Edit - Just checked Wiki and our scorers that day were Paul Sheerin,  Dunc Shearer,  the mentalist Paul Cherry,  Martin Bavidge and Mick Teasdale.  We had Charlie Christie and Barry Wilson playing that day too.  Some team.

I remember getting taken to a midweek game at Methil by my St. Mirren supporting uncle when I was about 8 years old. The reason it was so memorable is because it felt like it was about minus 15 and at half time I kicked a guys boiling hot Bovril over by mistake which burnt my foot. I think we stood beside the far corner flag you can see in that picture. 

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16 minutes ago, IrishBhoy said:

I remember getting taken to a midweek game at Methil by my St. Mirren supporting uncle when I was about 8 years old. The reason it was so memorable is because it felt like it was about minus 15 and at half time I kicked a guys boiling hot Bovril over by mistake which burnt my foot. I think we stood beside the far corner flag you can see in that picture. 

That picture must have been in final years of the stadium. I was there in the early 1970s and the terracing in parts was in a terrible state.

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3 minutes ago, Glenconner said:

That picture must have been in final years of the stadium. I was there in the early 1970s and the terracing in parts was in a terrible state.

I may be wrong then as this match was around 1994? I’m sure it was Methil we went to as my Uncle still talks about it being the coldest game he has ever been to. 

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21 minutes ago, IrishBhoy said:

I may be wrong then as this match was around 1994? I’m sure it was Methil we went to as my Uncle still talks about it being the coldest game he has ever been to. 

You’re probably correct regarding the game you attended. As i say my first visit was nearly 50 years ago. The new ground opened in 1998

Edited by Glenconner

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3 minutes ago, Glenconner said:

You’re probably correct regarding the game you attended. As i say my first visit was nearly 50 years ago. The new ground opened in 1998

Ah right I read your post wrong. I have watched a match at the new ground as well which funnily enough was also in my top 10 coldest days out at the football :lol: 

 

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I just found the pic online. Looks to be early to mid 90's and yep in August 98 they were still playing there but by the December they were in the new ground. 

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I remember that Tommy Burns joined Kilmarnock when they had been relegated to D2 in the late 80s. He played a game for Killie at Bayview and had to be substituted due to hypothermia..

Not the warmest place! 

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Can any older posters name the ground Jock Stein is at here?

My guess-timate is Somerset Park, Ayr but could be Brockville as well maybe?

FB_IMG_1555360766018.jpg

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39 minutes ago, Flybhoy said:

Can any older posters name the ground Jock Stein is at here?

My guess-timate is Somerset Park, Ayr but could be Brockville as well maybe?

FB_IMG_1555360766018.jpg

Hampden 

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First dugouts were at Pittodrie:

The Dugout and Technical Area In Football

dugout
By Jimbo online at English Wikipedia [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Is there a more random thing in football than the ‘dugout’? Nowadays it’s referred to more commonly as the technical area, but that doesn’t make it any weirder, when you think about it. There is no way that the side of the pitch is the best place to be when trying to make out what’s happening on a football pitch. It’s why television companies don’t use the steady-cam view for the entire broadcast of a match, for example, and it’s why the most expensive tickets are ones that offer a full view of the pitch from higher up rather than the ones just in front of the hoardings. Yet if a manager dares to sit up in the stands then they’re lambasted for not being on the sideline and in touch with their players.

Where, then, did the idea for a dugout come from? Why was it developed in the first place and how has it become the area that it is today? There are certain aspects to football matches that we take for granted. Why are the pitches outlined the way that they are, for example? What’s the point in corner flags? Where did the idea of showing yellow and red cards come from? These are all questions that we’ve answered elsewhere on this site, so it seemed natural to take on the question of dugouts as the next thing on our list. We’ll do our best to explain the logic behind one of the strangest aspects of a football match, though we can’t promise to explain why managers continue to use them even in the day and age of developing technology that would allow them to communicate with their coaching staff easily enough from a more elevated position…

 

Who Invented The Dugout and Why Did It Catch On?

dugouts on a pitch
By Jimbo online at English Wikipedia [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Donald Colman was born in a small village in Scotland on the 14th of August in 1878. He was a football fanatic, falling in love with the game from an early age and having to lie to his parents about it in order to sign up for his local team. He was born as Donald Cunningham, you see, changing his name to Donald Colman in order to stop his mum and dad finding out that he’d be playing football every weekend.

He went on to play for Aberdeen more than three-hundred times, got four Scotland call-ups and might have been more successful if he hadn’t been called up for World War One. He continued to play briefly when he returned from the War but had also developed an interest in coaching and eventually got a job as a player coach for Dumbarton.

 
It wasn’t just Dumbarton where Colman earned his stripes. In the summer he would travel over to Norway to work with football coaches there and learn some ideas from them. It was here that he first observed the idea of managers being stood under a shelter, with the Norwegian coaches standing in what were essentially open-fronted bus shelters as they watched their teams play.
neglected dugout
By grassrootsgroundswell (Crediton United v Teignmouth) [CC BY 2.0 ], via Wikimedia Commons

As a coach he began to believe in the importance of watching a player’s footwork closely, so when he was invited back to Aberdeen as a coach in 1931 he decided to see if there was anything he could do to help him watch the players even more intently. He asked the groundskeepers at Pittodrie Stadium to literally dig out the ground at the side of the pitch, covering with an open-fronted shelter similar to those that he’d seen in Norway.

From his new vantage point, Colman could watch the footwork of his players during the match and get a real sense for whether they were doing in real-life what he’d been working with them on in training. He also realised that the roof meant that he could make notes about his players without them getting wet in the miserable Scottish weather.

Later in the 1930s, Everton Football Club played against Aberdeen in a friendly and the club staff liked the idea of a sunken dugout so much that they installed one at Goodison Park when they returned to England. So it was that a football-obsessed Scotsman helped to create one of the most iconic and, if we’re honest, bizarre aspects of a football pitch and spread it around the United Kingdom and, eventually, the world.

taken from this site: https://www.football-stadiums.co.uk/articles/the-dugout/

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That's great, when I saw the previous picture my first thought was where on earth the idea for a dugout came from as I've sat in the front row at hampden before and it's utter baws watching a match while sitting below pitch level!

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