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Village of Glenbuck and it's Footballing History


Roy Race
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That's the one. South Ayrshire Council will have the rights to the book I would think - they should re-publish it - there will be a market for it now.

Definitely, I'm going to try and get a hold of a copy and at least take a photocopy of it. Friend of mine at Kilsyth Rangers recently gave me a photocopy of the original Rob Roy history book published in 1960. A great read, the journalistic quality was so much better in those days, there was none of the silly nonsense that you get in many publications nowadays.

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Got the book from Santa and shy'd away from it, will give it a loon now. I'm not a reader and first book I read front to back on years was Taxi for Farrell which I couldn't put down
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The overlay maps are great fun. Experiment with the left-hand panel for different map overlays and magnifications.

There really isn't anything left of Glenbuck, as the overlay map shows.

Had no idea it existed! I'm looking about bits of Glasgow on it now.

Got the book from Santa and shy'd away from it, will give it a loon now. I'm not a reader and first book I read front to back on years was Taxi for Farrell which I couldn't put down

It's a really good read. It spends a fair bit of time on the careers of the less well known - to me anyway - Glenbuckians who went on to do well down south at Preston NE, Spurs, and the like rather than just Shankley himself, although he gets a few chapters. There are also chapters about the Junior side.

Not only did the place export a disproportionate number of professional players but they were often very successful too, winning FA Cups, etc, although weirdly a lot of that success was in England rather than up the road in Glasgow where you might have expected it to be.

It has a lot of interesting social history about the village too. I don't know how true this part is but the book says that Shankley and a lot of other guys from the village would travel up to Glasgow to watch Celtic one week and Rangers the next without having any sort of allegiance to one or the other - just because they liked the game so much. I'm taking that with a pinch of salt but I suppose it was a different place at a different time.

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You can also download a pdf of a booklet at http://www.ayrshirehistory.com/pdf/cherrypickers.pdf

Aw brilliant mate thanks, that is the book in question thanks for sharing this excellent piece of history

EBay can stick their £28 where the sun don't shine ha

Edited by Roy Race
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That was a good wee documentary, and I wish the guys well in their endeavours to create some sort of tangible and permanent memorial in Glenbuck, it will be interesting to follow its progress and see how it works out.

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Thanks for putting this on here, a very informative read. Rather sad to read about the complete destruction of a village.

There's also a missing village in the middle of Strathclyde Park.

Eff it, i'll throw in the one underneath Glasgow Central station for a treble.

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There's also a missing village in the middle of Strathclyde Park.

Eff it, i'll throw in the one underneath Glasgow Central station for a treble.

Bothwellhaugh ....not missing but bulldozed and flattened.It was a wee mining community with,afaik,zero fitba connection and its population declined over the years until,at the time it was cleared,there was only a handful of folk living there.

History of Strathclyde Country Park

The remains of Bothwellhaugh Roman Fort and a Roman bath house can be seen in the park as well the site of the Battle of Bothwell Bridge (1679). Strathclyde Loch which hosts a number of world class rowing events each year was created in the early 1970s, this involved the flooding of the old mining village of Bothwellhaugh.

Hamilton Palace Colliery was one of several pits in Lanarkshire owned by The Bent Coal Company. Bothwellhaugh Village was closely associated with the pit known locally as “The Palis”.

The pit provided employment for over 1400 people, and excavated 2000 tonnes of coal a day.

The closure of the colliery in 1959 saw the decline of the community and the decision was eventually made to demolish the village, due to deterioration. Local myth has led many to believe that the village lies submerged under the waters of the loch, giving it the title “The Drowned Village”.

The area was infact bulldozed and cleared prior to the construction of Strathclyde Country Park. Strathclyde Country Park surrounds the scenic Strathclyde Loch where our Walk to Remember will take place around.

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