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jamamafegan

Reintroducing native species to Scotland

Reintroduction of native species to Scotland  

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-38972081

"Scotland's "dramatic open views and vistas" could be threatened by plans to increase woodland cover, according to mountaineers and gamekeepers.

Mountaineering Scotland and the Scottish Gamekeepers Association have jointly written to Scotland's environment secretary."

What a joke. Mountaineering Scotland should be ashamed of themselves. We all know gamekeepers are desperate to cling onto as much desolate, bleak moorland as possible for their precious grouse shooting reserves - but to suggest trees will "ruin the view?" What an embarrassment. Have these people never been to the likes of Glen Affric before?

It's backwards thinking like this that is holding back Scotland's true countryside potential. Back in the day, Scotland was blanketed in pine forests which supported lots of different species. Then the crofters moved in with the sheep, and then the estates turned the land into grouse shooting moorlands. This has resulted in Scotland coming to resemble, in most part, the surface of the moon.

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30 minutes ago, Bully Wee Villa said:

How many species have they actually reintroduced so far, and has anyone seen any of them in the wild?

They've previously re-introduced birds into the wild- Red Kite, Ospreys, Capercailie.

I've seen a Red Kite.

If you think of something big like a Red Deer unless you're lucky or keen eyed you don't really see them in the wild let alone a lynx or a beaver.

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Don't think Ospreys were ever reintroduced in Scotland. White tailed eagles certainly but not ospreys. You see a fair few Red Kites over Inverness way and up over the Black Isle. Worth taking a trip up that way if you've an interest in seeing them.

I'd love to see Lynx and wolves getting reintroduced but I'd be wary of their effect on other species that might be struggling such as Capercaillie and Red Squirrels.

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How many species have they actually reintroduced so far, and has anyone seen any of them in the wild?


Sea Eagles and Beaver are recent introductions. I've seen Sea eagles and they are magnificant. Let's not forget though that the point of introduction is not just about seeing the animals - it's the ecological impact they have on the landscape. For examples, beavers when they build dams create wetlands that create new habitats for a variety of species.

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2 hours ago, RiG said:

Don't think Ospreys were ever reintroduced in Scotland. White tailed eagles certainly but not ospreys. You see a fair few Red Kites over Inverness way and up over the Black Isle. Worth taking a trip up that way if you've an interest in seeing them.

I'd love to see Lynx and wolves getting reintroduced but I'd be wary of their effect on other species that might be struggling such as Capercaillie and Red Squirrels.

You're right - ospreys came back under their own steam, naturally recolonising  probably as an overspill of the Scandinavian population in the 1950s after being extinct in the UK for 40-50 years.

The same process is happening now with the common crane, which is back breeding regularly in small numbers for the first time in a couple of hundred years.

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1 hour ago, jamamafegan said:

Sea Eagles and Beaver are recent introductions. I've seen Sea eagles and they are magnificant. Let's not forget though that the point of introduction is not just about seeing the animals - it's the ecological impact they have on the landscape. For examples, beavers when they build dams create wetlands that create new habitats for a variety of species.

But that can also have a negative effect as well. Whilst it might benefit animals like water voles and otters to have an increased area of wetland to forage in it might affect other species like salmon and trout by reducing their ability to returning from sea to spawn.

Edited by RiG

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What dinosaurs were native to Scotland? I'd like them brought back too, Jurassic Park tells you exactly how to do it so no excuses.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Bully Wee Villa said:

What dinosaurs were native to Scotland? I'd like them brought back too, Jurassic Park tells you exactly how to do it so no excuses.

Theropod and sauropod tracks, from the Jurassic period, have been found on Skye. 

Get on with it - no excuses. ;)

 

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9 hours ago, jamamafegan said:

 


Sea Eagles and Beaver are recent introductions. I've seen Sea eagles and they are magnificant. Let's not forget though that the point of introduction is not just about seeing the animals - it's the ecological impact they have on the landscape. For examples, beavers when they build dams create wetlands that create new habitats for a variety of species.

 

 

8 hours ago, RiG said:

But that can also have a negative effect as well. Whilst it might benefit animals like water voles and otters to have an increased area of wetland to forage in it might affect other species like salmon and trout by reducing their ability to returning from sea to spawn.

It's rare that a beaver dam will stop salmon getting upstream as they can jump over the dam.

http://scottishwildbeavers.org.uk/facts-and-fiction-the-scientific-bit/beavers-and-salmon/

 

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Theropod and sauropod tracks, from the Jurassic period, have been found on Skye. 
Get on with it - no excuses. 
 


I'm trying, can't seem to find any dino DNA trapped in amber.

As a plan B, I am attempting to get a crocodile to have sex with a chicken but it just keeps eating them.

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9 hours ago, Bully Wee Villa said:

 


I'm trying, can't seem to find any dino DNA trapped in amber.

As a plan B, I am attempting to get a crocodile to have sex with a chicken but it just keeps eating them.

 

:lol:

9 hours ago, Bully Wee Villa said:

Success!

4fb1a8e64c2843b4662724e165ce0768.jpg

That's brilliant - is it a female?

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Scotland needs a Nessie breeding programme,

 

Every loch in Scotland to have a monster with 25 years.

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In true Scottish style, I think we should be thinking outside the box with this one, introducing something completely unexpected like the kangaroo. I'd love to drive around Pitlochry and catch a glimpse of a wild kangaroo kicking the shit out of the Hunter-Wellies wearing wanks that reside up that way. Or the fly fishers — f*ck them too. C*nts.

Thank you.

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Every Loch would have its own named monster,

Loch Ness - Nessie

Loch Earn - Earnie

Loch Garry - Garry

Loch Leven - Craig Leven

Loch Broom - Sweepie

VisitScotland adverts would be Come to Scotland, It's Monsterous

Edited by MEADOWXI

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On 2/15/2017 at 11:17, jamamafegan said:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-38972081

"Scotland's "dramatic open views and vistas" could be threatened by plans to increase woodland cover, according to mountaineers and gamekeepers.

Mountaineering Scotland and the Scottish Gamekeepers Association have jointly written to Scotland's environment secretary."

What a joke. Mountaineering Scotland should be ashamed of themselves. We all know gamekeepers are desperate to cling onto as much desolate, bleak moorland as possible for their precious grouse shooting reserves - but to suggest trees will "ruin the view?" What an embarrassment. Have these people never been to the likes of Glen Affric before?

It's backwards thinking like this that is holding back Scotland's true countryside potential. Back in the day, Scotland was blanketed in pine forests which supported lots of different species. Then the crofters moved in with the sheep, and then the estates turned the land into grouse shooting moorlands. This has resulted in Scotland coming to resemble, in most part, the surface of the moon.

Totally agree. There are plenty of barren glens; some might even be tempted to say too many! If they were just complaining about the prospect of the Forestry Commission planting a bunch of square blocks of Norweigian Spuce that no-one wants to see, and that is an eyesore that does nothing for biodiversity, then I'd say fair enough. But that's not the case - a great deal of proposed planting is to reestablish further areas of Great Caledonian Forest, and the mix of pines and deciduous hardwoods that this entail represents exactly the sort of conservation-driven projects that can actually be used to boost tourism as well as sustain local species.

No surprise to see the Poisoning Gameskeepers acting like wanks. Mountineering Scotland should hang their heads though. Bearded twats.

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