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Reintroducing native species to Scotland

Reintroduction of native species to Scotland  

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A few people have spoken about wolves in Sutherland. That plan was shelved. The brainchild of king of the dicks Paul lister for his alladale estate. He claims it is rewilding but it's just a big safari park, the animals are in enclosures and are fed. There is no ecological or scientific value to what he does.

I'm all for giving this a bash and anything that reduces deer and sheep numbers is fine by me. If that makes farming either of them uneconomical tough shit. They are both four footed locusts who keep the highlands in its present state of an ecological monoculture.

Go and take a walk along upper Glen feshie or Glen lui to see what Scotland free if deer and sheep looks like.

Its true though what people don't realise is how much the landscape has changed over the last 300 years due to farming and estate management, its not a natural scenescape. Those hills or mountains we see as we travel along the A9 from Blair Athol to Inverness most if they had been left alone would have been covered in trees at least on the lower levels, they look bleak and empty and you can see erosion on many of the lower slopes and no tree is ever going to root there, even if it did the sheep would graze it down.

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Its true though what people don't realise is how much the landscape has changed over the last 300 years due to farming and estate management, its not a natural scenescape. Those hills or mountains we see as we travel along the A9 from Blair Athol to Inverness most if they had been left alone would have been covered in trees at least on the lower levels, they look bleak and empty and you can see erosion on many of the lower slopes and no tree is ever going to root there, even if it did the sheep would graze it down.

It wouldn't quite be the Caledonian pine forest. That was already dieing due to the wetter climate before humans finished the job. However you are quite right there would have been significant birch forest and Scots pine where you are talking about.

There could be again within a generation of the interests of the highland landowners was ever challenged.

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I quite like the idea of walking around the highlands without the impending fear of being mauled by a wild animal, so I'm going to propose an alternative solution.

According to various scientific and socio-economic predictions (see UN, WHO and Unicef), the decreasing availability of food and the subsequent shortages in the Western World will increase towards a natural tipping-point around 2025. This is obviously already a problem in other parts of the world, but we could potentially turn the overpopulation of deer into a subsidised source of sustenance for our society, addressing the problem before it reaches crisis point.

Couple these bleak predictions with the reality that Iain Davidson is out of contract at Dundee in just a short matter of months, I propose that we combine a National Treasure with a National Concern and kill two birds (and thousands of deer) with one solitary, socially challenged stone.

The answer is simple; equip Iain Davidson with a pair of night-vision goggles, an emergency flair gun and a machete and reintroduce him into the wild.

Not only will he serve as a natural means of population control for the deer, he'll help the surrounding species and environment from being degraded. When the resulting pile of deer carcases reaches a certain, pre-agreed quantity, he would simply use his flair gun to alert conservation specialists who would gather the resources and distribute to communities accordingly. No need for human contact or unnecessary risk; this solution is cheap and relatively* safe.

We would be protecting our countryside, feeding our children and keeping an honourable gent in work.

*I acknowledge that an encounter with Davo may result in substantial injury, loss or damage, but local farmers could be paid an annual fee to help account for any disturbance to their estate.

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Many people here worried about wolves. They aren't really dangerous. People seem to think they are ferocious beasts that, in their pack, will hunt you down. This is a common misconception, it's not like that at all.

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Many people here worried about wolves. They aren't really dangerous. People seem to think they are ferocious beasts that, in their pack, will hunt you down. This is a common misconception, it's not like that at all.

Wolves stay clear of humans, but is there enough room left for them to be left alone?

People need to be educated but given the attitude of some landowners towards predatory animals such as birds of prey you just can't educate people who won't listen. I think its a bad move if they are ever allowed to run loose. Scotland has changed so much since wolves were native to this country and I can't see there being any tolerance especially from estates or farmers.

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I know it's available, but if there are so many deer, why aren't we awash with cheap venison?

In Inverness we have Roe, Mountjac and the occasional Red Deer roaming around gardens and they are powerful animals and not docile like cows or sheep. You can't just walk up to one throw a rope around it and expect it to follow you, they are beasts from hell when cornered.

Its ok on the hills to cull deer where its open ground with licence and there aren't hillwalkers and tourists bumbling around to get in the way but take a high powered rifle into the city or town and try to hunt the urban deer and you are more likely to end up being hunted yourself by armed police.

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In Inverness we have Roe, Mountjac and the occasional Red Deer roaming around gardens and they are powerful animals and not docile like cows or sheep. You can't just walk up to one throw a rope around it and expect it to follow you, they are beasts from hell when cornered.

Its ok on the hills to cull deer where its open ground with licence and there aren't hillwalkers and tourists bumbling around to get in the way but take a high powered rifle into the city or town and try to hunt the urban deer and you are more likely to end up being hunted yourself by armed police.

I wasn't going to catch it myself. Surely a few tcheucters, suitably armed, could bring enough deer down to make sure we all eat like kings. Edited by Sergeant Wilson

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I know it's available, but if there are so many deer, why aren't we awash with cheap venison?

Cue the 'expensive antlers' joke.

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I don't really care about attacks on humans.

If you don't want to run the low risk getting attacked, don't go to areas populated by said animals. We're not the only inhabitants of this land, and I don't think our peace of mind and "safety" trumps all other concerns.

Ironic though we should completely ignore the elephant in the room when talking about overpopulation here.

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I'm all for the honey badger and hyena being introduced to Scotland.

On a serious note, I think wolves would be alright. I like being at the top of the food chain though so no bears please.

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I'm all for the honey badger and hyena being introduced to Scotland.

On a serious note, I think wolves would be alright. I like being at the top of the food chain though so no bears please.

Humans are apex predators.

We're above bears.

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Many people here worried about wolves. They aren't really dangerous. People seem to think they are ferocious beasts that, in their pack, will hunt you down. This is a common misconception, it's not like that at all.

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I don't really care about attacks on humans.

If you don't want to run the low risk getting attacked, don't go to areas populated by said animals. We're not the only inhabitants of this land, and I don't think our peace of mind and "safety" trumps all other concerns.

Ironic though we should completely ignore the elephant in the room when talking about overpopulation here.

A bit difficult if said animals come into the populated area. If prey animals like deer and rabbits live in the city like they do in Inverness the predators will follow especially in winter, but then if its easier to gain a meal from bins, takeaway left overs or just people feeding them they will adapt. Maybe not wolves or lynx but definitely bears. Bears and humans don't really mix and I certainly don't want to meet one face to face on my early morning walk to work.

I don't think there is enough room for large predators like wolf, bear and lynx to exist in the wild in this country along side humans even up here in the Highlands.

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