Jump to content

Car advice


Recommended Posts

29 minutes ago, Mr. Brightside said:

Anyone with a VW/Seat/Skoda had a turbo actuator issue? I've been told they need to replace my entire turbo to fix the issue with the actuator, obviously hoping to avoid this.

Is it a relatively new 1.2tsi/1.4tsi?

Actuator meant to pivot on a rod/spike type thing but seizes, so actuator rod can't travel. Can take them off, clean the hole, and get them working again, shouldn't need a turbo.

Edited by RandomGuy.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it a relatively new 1.2tsi/1.4tsi?
Actuator meant to pivot on a rod/spike type thing but seizes, so actuator rod can't travel. Can take them off, clean the hole, and get them working again, shouldn't need a turbo.

Aye it's a 66 1.2tsi. I figured something like that was possible. I'll try another place and hopefully they don't try to screw me over, cheers.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Mr. Brightside said:


Aye it's a 66 1.2tsi. I figured something like that was possible. I'll try another place and hopefully they don't try to screw me over, cheers.

Its not well known yet tbf, just had a sales car so had to fix it in any way without fitting a turbo 😂

20201016_144523.thumb.jpg.bbc5c361add2aa663f40a097211f2163.jpg

Thats one of the actuators, there's 2 different kinds. The hole at the end goes over a rod and is meant to rotate on it, but seizes so can't rotate, and the arm can't go in and out.

Takes a while of fucking about but cheaper than a turbo.

Edited by RandomGuy.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Zen Archer Esq. said:

Got the car back from it's MOT, wondered why it was rolling down the hill when I parked, the c***s had switched the auto hold off.

What is the advantage of this technology, so you don't have to put on a handbrake, and then a stranger can switch it off? Hover boards would be nice, but this is pointless.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
On 16/10/2020 at 18:54, welshbairn said:

What is the advantage of this technology, so you don't have to put on a handbrake, and then a stranger can switch it off? Hover boards would be nice, but this is pointless.

It's great for stopping at lights etc. Saves you having to put the handbrake on or off and the car doesn't roll.

It's not needed, but when you don't have it you miss it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

So thoughts on this one all....

I own a 3 cylinder 1l corsa that's around 6 years old, I think around 35k miles. Always done me fine, minor issues every year with servicing an it's went on it's way. The most severe issue I can find in its history was when it was a couple of years old when the ignition coil pack went and caused a loss of power, the previous owner got that sorted the same day.

So at the weekend, I noticed a loss of power, not too dissimilar to that set of symptoms so I tried to book it into a garage ASAP. I went somewhere new because they had availability to address the issue soon and I'd heard they were decent. On the morning I went to drive it down, I couldn't get it started or jumped and had to get it towed half a mile from the RAC.

The moment I spoke to the guy at the garage and explained what had happened and going through what the RAC guy had shown me on his diagnostic and his speculation re the ignition coil pack, he was heading me down the road of it being something they wouldn't be able to deal with - "No error codes is strange and usually mean it's a serious issue that would have to go back to the dealer" -. After a couple of days, has told me they have nothing and an engine compression test has told them two cylinders have no internal pressure and it's past anything they can do.

I don't really have any reason to doubt them and there's nothing against these guys to suggest they are inept but part of this just doesn't feel right, I know improbable events do happen but it just feels all wrong to me that I'd get that talk very early and the really early warning re error codes just comes across as total bullshit to me, it may have been expectations control but I would have thought that an actual mechanic wouldn't have been too reliant on sensors.

So I'm down £50 on that diagnostic and potentially facing the cost of a new car. What would be the best economical decision to make? Ask my more favoured garage for a second opinion and pay for their time or brave a Vauxhall dealer or just make the decision now to completely write this off and try and salvage sell on value?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, harry94 said:

So thoughts on this one all....

I own a 3 cylinder 1l corsa that's around 6 years old, I think around 35k miles. Always done me fine, minor issues every year with servicing an it's went on it's way. The most severe issue I can find in its history was when it was a couple of years old when the ignition coil pack went and caused a loss of power, the previous owner got that sorted the same day.

So at the weekend, I noticed a loss of power, not too dissimilar to that set of symptoms so I tried to book it into a garage ASAP. I went somewhere new because they had availability to address the issue soon and I'd heard they were decent. On the morning I went to drive it down, I couldn't get it started or jumped and had to get it towed half a mile from the RAC.

The moment I spoke to the guy at the garage and explained what had happened and going through what the RAC guy had shown me on his diagnostic and his speculation re the ignition coil pack, he was heading me down the road of it being something they wouldn't be able to deal with - "No error codes is strange and usually mean it's a serious issue that would have to go back to the dealer" -. After a couple of days, has told me they have nothing and an engine compression test has told them two cylinders have no internal pressure and it's past anything they can do.

I don't really have any reason to doubt them and there's nothing against these guys to suggest they are inept but part of this just doesn't feel right, I know improbable events do happen but it just feels all wrong to me that I'd get that talk very early and the really early warning re error codes just comes across as total bullshit to me, it may have been expectations control but I would have thought that an actual mechanic wouldn't have been too reliant on sensors.

So I'm down £50 on that diagnostic and potentially facing the cost of a new car. What would be the best economical decision to make? Ask my more favoured garage for a second opinion and pay for their time or brave a Vauxhall dealer or just make the decision now to completely write this off and try and salvage sell on value?

What sell on value?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, harry94 said:

Was assuming there is some sort of Manky Frankie mentalist who would enjoy hacking it to bits.

I think scrappies charge to take them away as far as I remember. 6 years old though, it's a bit early to give up. If it's paid for now and cost a grand to fix, you'd still spend more on a "new" car. Unless you go down the PCP route and get one for very little initial outlay.

I'd get it fixed, pay on credit card if it's expensive and get another few years out of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wasn't sure where to post this so I thought I'd give this a shot here.

I passed my driving test around 6 years ago and have only driven a handful of times since. Due to lockdown restrictions I decided to get some refresher lessons and pick this back up again and buy a car but with Glasgow in Tier 4 these got cancelled before I even started one.

My flatmate and I have hired a car for a week in the meantime. He's taken me out this evening for a couple of hours and I just drove round the local area getting familiar again with the biting point, clutch control etc and feel OK with this now. I guess onto other stuff tomorrow evening.

I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what I should re-learn and or focus on and how many hours this should take. I guess also if anyone has been in this situation before?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Mad Capsule said:

Wasn't sure where to post this so I thought I'd give this a shot here.

I passed my driving test around 6 years ago and have only driven a handful of times since. Due to lockdown restrictions I decided to get some refresher lessons and pick this back up again and buy a car but with Glasgow in Tier 4 these got cancelled before I even started one.

My flatmate and I have hired a car for a week in the meantime. He's taken me out this evening for a couple of hours and I just drove round the local area getting familiar again with the biting point, clutch control etc and feel OK with this now. I guess onto other stuff tomorrow evening.

I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what I should re-learn and or focus on and how many hours this should take. I guess also if anyone has been in this situation before?

Having taken three weans through their driving test in recent years and sitting with them after they passed their test I'd say:

1. Look beyond the end of the car's bonnet and learn how to look ahead and anticipate problems coming up.
2. Speed control is massive.  a. Keep up with traffic and don't drive like a fanny and b. Don't drive faster than you're  capable of controlling.  
3.  Motorways are tricky - especially when you join them.  Keep up a good speed and don't be intimidated.
4. Every other driver is a c**t so don't trust anyone.
5. Be endlessly polite and give other cars the same courtesy that you'd want back in return.

Over-all driving is pretty straightforward but it is a matter of practice and the keywords are confidence and courtesy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Mad Capsule said:

Wasn't sure where to post this so I thought I'd give this a shot here.

I passed my driving test around 6 years ago and have only driven a handful of times since. Due to lockdown restrictions I decided to get some refresher lessons and pick this back up again and buy a car but with Glasgow in Tier 4 these got cancelled before I even started one.

My flatmate and I have hired a car for a week in the meantime. He's taken me out this evening for a couple of hours and I just drove round the local area getting familiar again with the biting point, clutch control etc and feel OK with this now. I guess onto other stuff tomorrow evening.

I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what I should re-learn and or focus on and how many hours this should take. I guess also if anyone has been in this situation before?

Don't be such a weed, just get on with it. Refresher lessons indedd!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Mad Capsule said:

Wasn't sure where to post this so I thought I'd give this a shot here.

I passed my driving test around 6 years ago and have only driven a handful of times since. Due to lockdown restrictions I decided to get some refresher lessons and pick this back up again and buy a car but with Glasgow in Tier 4 these got cancelled before I even started one.

My flatmate and I have hired a car for a week in the meantime. He's taken me out this evening for a couple of hours and I just drove round the local area getting familiar again with the biting point, clutch control etc and feel OK with this now. I guess onto other stuff tomorrow evening.

I was wondering if anyone had any advice on what I should re-learn and or focus on and how many hours this should take. I guess also if anyone has been in this situation before?

I wouldn't bother with refresher lessons.  Driving lessons teach you how to pass the test, you learn to drive once you actually go out and start doing it yourself.  What you've been doing sounds fine, re familiarise yourself with driving a car and the rest will come with experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No 1 is the key. Look as far ahead as you can then back to where you are and anticipate every possible eventuality.

Having taken three weans through their driving test in recent years and sitting with them after they passed their test I'd say:
1. Look beyond the end of the car's bonnet and learn how to look ahead and anticipate problems coming up.
2. Speed control is massive.  a. Keep up with traffic and don't drive like a fanny and b. Don't drive faster than you're  capable of controlling.  
3.  Motorways are tricky - especially when you join them.  Keep up a good speed and don't be intimidated.
4. Every other driver is a c**t so don't trust anyone.
5. Be endlessly polite and give other cars the same courtesy that you'd want back in return.
Over-all driving is pretty straightforward but it is a matter of practice and the keywords are confidence and courtesy.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...