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It was the transit of Mercury across the face of the sun today. 

1) I was at work

2) I don't have a solar filter to avoid blindness

3) It was pishing with rain anyway. 

It next happens in 2034 or something. 

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32 minutes ago, Zen Archer Esq. said:

I'm sure he still plays guitar and records music.

Don’t believe me Joe Swash?

 

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Interesting religious perspective is pantheism, what paganism is adopted from.

The idea that the universe is your god, that the universe is your provider in the way other religions feel god is the provider.

When you consider things such as the anthropological principle of the position of the earth to be able to sustain life as we know it. It creates an opportunity to consider is it chance or is there more to the functions of the universe than we know of

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Chance imo. We hit a lucky streak. The Universe doesn't care about us, and isn't even aware.

Edited by welshbairn

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On 11/11/2019 at 22:10, D.A.F.C said:

Would the top of it be one of the best terrestrial places for a giant observatory with the thin atmosphere etc?

Many of the worlds most important telescopes are on Mauna Kea volcano in Hawaii. 

image_2.jpg

 

Others are on the volcannic island of La Palma. Mountain ranges create a lot of unstable air, while volcanoes often stand out on their own, so are high and have very stable air. This is why some of the biggest telescopes are on them. 

But moving one all the way to Mars would not really make much sense, if we could get it into orbit them keeping it there would be totally atmosphere free and there is no gravity so you can build it very light. 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-50419917

Quote

 

The oxygen in Martian air is changing in a way that can't currently be explained by known chemical processes.

That's the claim of scientists working on the Curiosity rover mission, who have been taking measurements of the gas.

They discovered that the amount of oxygen in Martian "air" rose by 30% in spring and summer.

The pattern remains a mystery, but researchers are beginning to narrow the possibilities.

While the changes are most likely to be geological in nature, planetary scientists can't completely rule out an explanation involving microbial life.

The results come from nearly six Earth years' (three Martian years') worth of data from the Sample Analysis at Mars (Sam) instrument, a portable chemistry lab in the belly of the Curiosity rover. 

 

 

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On 11/11/2019 at 22:10, D.A.F.C said:

Would the top of it be one of the best terrestrial places for a giant observatory with the thin atmosphere etc?

"Terrestrial" means Earth so the answer is obviously No.

It might be the best Martian place for an observatory but that is a different question.

Maybe the Martians could use it to observe us!

Edited by Fullerene

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4 hours ago, Fullerene said:

Maybe the Martians could use it to observe us!

Like someone with a microscope would study the creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water? And slowly draw their plans........

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On 15/11/2019 at 04:28, Fullerene said:

"Terrestrial" means Earth so the answer is obviously No.

It might be the best Martian place for an observatory but that is a different question.

Maybe the Martians could use it to observe us!

 

On 15/11/2019 at 09:09, dorlomin said:

Like someone with a microscope would study the creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water? And slowly draw their plans........

The chances of anything coming from Mars are a million to one, he said.  Yet still, they come...

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"Terrestrial" means Earth so the answer is obviously No.
It might be the best Martian place for an observatory but that is a different question.
Maybe the Martians could use it to observe us!
Minds immeasurably superior to ours.

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Was in Lake Tekapo, New Zealand at an International Dark Sky Reserve 2 weeks ago.  

Perfect, clear night. Could see two neighbouring galaxies with the naked eye and lots of shooting stars.  Also a constant stream of satellites passing over.  Learnt how to navigate using the Southern Cross, looked through a telescope at Saturn, Orion Nebula, Oldest Stars in the Milky Way, and the Moon.  Absolutely loved it. 

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15 minutes ago, AberdeenHibee said:

Was in Lake Tekapo, New Zealand at an International Dark Sky Reserve 2 weeks ago.  

Perfect, clear night. Could see two neighbouring galaxies with the naked eye and lots of shooting stars.  Also a constant stream of satellites passing over.  Learnt how to navigate using the Southern Cross, looked through a telescope at Saturn, Orion Nebula, Oldest Stars in the Milky Way, and the Moon.  Absolutely loved it. 

The Southern Hemisphere sky is amazing. Getting a telescope or binoculars onto the Jewel Box is pretty awesome, the  Small and Large Magellanic Clouds are as you say entire other galaxies to gaze at. 

Remember being out in the desert in Australia and feeling like the sky was 3D at night, the clarity and depth were such a world away from the UK and the couple of stars that poke past the road lights and towns. 

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On 16/11/2019 at 22:18, D.A.F.C said:
On 15/11/2019 at 04:28, Fullerene said:
"Terrestrial" means Earth so the answer is obviously No.
It might be the best Martian place for an observatory but that is a different question.
Maybe the Martians could use it to observe us!

Minds immeasurably superior to ours.

if by 'ours' you mean the collective intellect of the P&B illuminati, then i'm thinking that it will be possible to utterly confound the inevitable future invasion by our potential martian overlords simply by guiding them in to a circular containment area - and telling them to stand in the corner....

 

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9 hours ago, Herman Hessian said:

if by 'ours' you mean the collective intellect of the P&B illuminati, then i'm thinking that it will be possible to utterly confound the inevitable future invasion by our potential martian overlords simply by guiding them in to a circular containment area - and telling them to stand in the corner....

 

Or turn their heating on full blast and open all their windows.

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This is going to be the absolute dogs bollox. I do not think there has been an inflight abort test in the US since Apollo. 

Quote

 

NASA and SpaceX are targeting no earlier than Jan. 11, 2020, for a critical In-Flight Abort Test of the Crew Dragon spacecraft from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, pending U.S. Air Force Eastern Range approval.

As part of the test, SpaceX will configure Crew Dragon to trigger a launch escape shortly after liftoff and demonstrate Crew Dragon’s capability to safely separate from the Falcon 9 rocket in the unlikely event of an in-flight emergency. The demonstration also will provide valuable data toward NASA certifying SpaceX’s crew transportation system for carrying astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

The demonstration of Crew Dragon’s launch escape system is part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program and is one of the final major tests for the company before NASA astronauts will fly aboard the spacecraft.

The In-Flight Abort Test follows a series of static fire engine tests of the spacecraft conducted Nov. 13 near SpaceX’s Landing Zone 1 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. SpaceX will also conduct a static fire test of its Falcon 9 rocket ahead of the In-Flight Abort Test.

 

https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2019/12/18/spacex-in-flight-abort-test-launch-date-update-2/

 

That is during the launch phase of a rocket the human rated capsule will blow off the rocket and I assume the rocket will be destroyed in flight. 

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35 minutes ago, NewBornBairn said:

Over 50 years since it was last done -

 

Nasa did it a few weeks ago with their ridiculously expensive Orion system.

 

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Boeing about to launch their unmanned shuttle to the Space Station. Got a weird feeling it's going to go terribly wrong.

 

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