Jump to content

Last Book You Read....


H_B

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood

Sequel to The Handmaid's Tale.  It's a worthy follow up, written from the POV of 3 very different women, all crucial to the collapse of the patriarchal Gilead regime.  I don't know if it was intentional, but for me there are echoes of ISIS in the Gilead society, which make it all the more terrifyingly possible.

Overall, a good book.  Highly recommended it you liked The Handmaid's Tale, still recommended as a stand alone book.

Plot spoiler below.

Spoiler

The one annoying thing for me was how unrealistic it was that Jade / baby Nicole was not just willing but actually pursuaded to make the dangerous journey back to Gilead.  The author could have thought up a more plausible reason for her to go there.

 

Edited by Gnash
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finished The Girl Who Died by Ragnar Jonasson today. It was fine, a decent ending probably made me rate it a bit higher than I would have otherwise. Jonasson is definitely at his best when writing his Ari Thor books, this definitely wasn't up to their standard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I decided 2021 would be the year I read William Faulkner. Started with As I Lay Dying, an atmospheric road trip with a Southern family transporting a decomposing corpse.  Then moved onto The Sound and the Fury, where a dysfunctional Southern family tear themselves to pieces as the Negros look on. Both brilliant reads. As I Lay Dying has you wondering what the f**k is going to happen with the corpse, while Sound and Fury features a great villain with the funniest lines in either book.

Best writer the American South has produced, I suggest.

 

16046C6B-3669-4975-B5C9-727422719DB0.png.73b385ebaf66b27aef2cde4df63a1fc5.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Duszek said:

I decided 2021 would be the year I read William Faulkner. Started with As I Lay Dying, an atmospheric road trip with a Southern family transporting a decomposing corpse.  Then moved onto The Sound and the Fury, where a dysfunctional Southern family tear themselves to pieces as the Negros look on. Both brilliant reads. As I Lay Dying has you wondering what the f**k is going to happen with the corpse, while Sound and Fury features a great villain with the funniest lines in either book.

Best writer the American South has produced, I suggest.

 

16046C6B-3669-4975-B5C9-727422719DB0.png.73b385ebaf66b27aef2cde4df63a1fc5.png

He stole that first one from National Lampoon's Vacation 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Been on a bit of a binge over the last week or so.

The Glass Hotel by Emily St John Mandel -- follow up to Station Eleven. It's probably my least favourite of hers. Beautifully written but way too much navel gazing about the operation of a failed Ponzi scheme. 3/5

Ruthless Women by Melanie Blake -- apparently this is a bonkbuster. It's been all over my Twitter feed so I gave it a go. Fiftysomething women involved in the world of TV and soap operas, all with perfect breasts topped with perfect nipples, all of them never more than a passing rumbling truck away from multiple earth-shattering orgasms. Quite amusing in places, not always intentionally. Utter trash. 2/5

Phrase Seven by Chase Hughes -- one of my Lockdown Rabbit-holes on YouTube has been The Behavior Panel, a group of body language experts who pass opinion on interviews by celebrities and royal nonces and highlight their giveaway red flags. Chase Hughes is one of the panel, has signed up for Dan Brown's Masterclass, and come up with a high-hokum bit of people running around explaining the plot to each other which secret phrases are enough to hypnotise, corrupt, and even kill (dum-dum-dum). 3/5

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes -- pick of the bunch, a super short novel about memory and refelction and reliability and betrayal. My first foray into Julian Barnes' work and I thought it was something of a triumph, let down my a frustratingly obtuse event in the denouement. 4/5

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oranges and Lemons - Christopher Fowler. The latest in his Bryant and May series. You kind of know what to expect now he's written twenty or so, but still a good old fashioned copper story - with everybody's favorite old fashioned coppers.
After finishing this,I felt the need to read (alright, re read)a bit more of his non-series stuff (Rune, Roofworld, Soho Black, Spanky and the like) and to my delight discovered that there are a good half a dozen short story collections and a few novels I had never heard of newly released on Kindle. Some of the early stuff reads like early stuff, but all full of his deep love of London and its history.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, MSU said:

 

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes -- pick of the bunch, a super short novel about memory and refelction and reliability and betrayal. My first foray into Julian Barnes' work and I thought it was something of a triumph, let down my a frustratingly obtuse event in the denouement. 4/5

My favourite Barnes (middle England is really good as well if you want more of his, although very different)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Genuine Hibs Fan said:

My favourite Barnes (middle England is really good as well if you want more of his, although very different)

Thanks for the recommendation. After The Sense of an Ending, I can see me working my way through his stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've not long finished Young Adam by Alexander Trocchi. It obviously had the Ewan McGregor adaptation but it seems to fly under the radar as a Scottish classic probably due to the nastiness of  both the narrator and Trocchi himself. It's a great book and quite similar to Camus's The Outsider only it's set on the Edinburgh-Glasgow canal rather than Algeria and has loads of shagging.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 15/07/2021 at 14:53, WhiteRoseKillie said:

Oranges and Lemons - Christopher Fowler. The latest in his Bryant and May series. You kind of know what to expect now he's written twenty or so, but still a good old fashioned copper story - with everybody's favorite old fashioned coppers.
After finishing this,I felt the need to read (alright, re read)a bit more of his non-series stuff (Rune, Roofworld, Soho Black, Spanky and the like) and to my delight discovered that there are a good half a dozen short story collections and a few novels I had never heard of newly released on Kindle. Some of the early stuff reads like early stuff, but all full of his deep love of London and its history.
 

I made the mistake of reading the paperback Spanky on the bus on the way to work.  I've managed to get a seat to myself ever since.  Would read again.

BTW B&M has been an excellent series.  I've got Oranges and Lemons lined up for September (it's tradishniul, OK?) but I believe it has the hint of an ending to the series so I'm a bit conflicted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Detournement said:

I've not long finished Young Adam by Alexander Trocchi. It obviously had the Ewan McGregor adaptation but it seems to fly under the radar as a Scottish classic probably due to the nastiness of  both the narrator and Trocchi himself. It's a great book and quite similar to Camus's The Outsider only it's set on the Edinburgh-Glasgow canal rather than Algeria and has loads of shagging.

 

I remember flicking through a copy in Waterstones on Sauchiehall Street years back. I was reading the page with the wee bit of poo on the end of his Johnson after a bit of the old backdoor fun, when I sensed this old dear looking over my shoulder.  I declined her unspoken offer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made the mistake of reading the paperback Spanky on the bus on the way to work.  I've managed to get a seat to myself ever since.  Would read again.
BTW B&M has been an excellent series.  I've got Oranges and Lemons lined up for September (it's tradishniul, OK?) but I believe it has the hint of an ending to the series so I'm a bit conflicted.
Be fair - the PCU is under threat of closure in every book. Plus Bryant and May must be about a hundred and fifty by now, and still going strong.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ZeroZeroZero

Roberto Saviano (him who wrote Gomorrah La Serie and lives in permanent hiding from the mafia. This was made into a drama for TV (see it on Sky Atlantic) but the book is a non-fiction look at the drugs trade and how it gets its tentacles into everyday life. Even sleepy RBS gets blasted for its role in laundering narco/Russian mafia money. 
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, WhiteRoseKillie said:
1 hour ago, The DA said:
I made the mistake of reading the paperback Spanky on the bus on the way to work.  I've managed to get a seat to myself ever since.  Would read again.
BTW B&M has been an excellent series.  I've got Oranges and Lemons lined up for September (it's tradishniul, OK?) but I believe it has the hint of an ending to the series so I'm a bit conflicted.

Be fair - the PCU is under threat of closure in every book. Plus Bryant and May must be about a hundred and fifty by now, and still going strong.

Let's just say that I identify just a little...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 15/07/2021 at 13:49, MSU said:

Been on a bit of a binge over the last week or so.

The Glass Hotel by Emily St John Mandel -- follow up to Station Eleven. It's probably my least favourite of hers. Beautifully written but way too much navel gazing about the operation of a failed Ponzi scheme. 3/5

See, I really liked The Glass Hotel. Thought the character work was excellent. Haven't read Station Eleven yet, but it is in my ever growing to read pile.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Craig the Hunter said:

See, I really liked The Glass Hotel. Thought the character work was excellent. Haven't read Station Eleven yet, but it is in my ever growing to read pile.

If I hadn’t read her other work and loved it so much I’m sure I would’ve enjoyed The Glass Hotel more, and there’s still plenty to admire in it. I’ll be interested in your thoughts on Station Eleven once you get round to it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...