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Recently read all the Cosmere books currently written by Brandon Sanderson. There are about 15 or so with about 20 odd still to come. 

Tremendous high fantasy from the guy who finished the Wheel of Time after the original author Robert Jordan died.

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Just finished an HG Wells compendium. The Island of Dr Moreau was my favourite. The Invisible Man was the worst.

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I’m half way through reading Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James. He jokingly called it an African Game of Thrones but it’s not too bad a description. Reminds me a bit of some of Louis de Berniere’s trippy South American books. First part of a fantasy trilogy and I think it’s going to be roughly the same story told from three perspectives. 

Half way through listening to James Ellroy’s latest in his second American trilogy (This Storm). Pretty much as you’d expect. Lots of rude words!

 

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The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd. Whilst I dont think Nan was ever mounted during her lifetime, it’s a beautifully written book.

Edited by Melanius Mullarkey

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10 minutes ago, Shandon Par said:

I’m half way through reading Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James. He jokingly called it an African Game of Thrones but it’s not too bad a description. Reminds me a bit of some of Louis de Berniere’s trippy South American books. First part of a fantasy trilogy and I think it’s going to be roughly the same story told from three perspectives. 

Half way through listening to James Ellroy’s latest in his second American trilogy (This Storm). Pretty much as you’d expect. Lots of rude words!

 

I've been checking airports the last few months for This Storm in the airport only paperbacks sections, no luck, bit surprised. Might give Marlon James a go. Been meaning to read Brief History of Seven Killings for ages but the text is tiny in my copy and it hurts my head.

Edited by welshbairn

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The Age of Football by David Goldblatt: A history of football in the 21st century and how it is inextricably intertwined with culture and politics. A sequel to The Ball is Round which is the greatest football book of all time. A great read, with a truly astounding breadth of subject matter. The only problem is the discomfort of reading about all the messed up stuff that football - a sport capable of moments of the purest joy and most revolutionary social potential - is intertwined with.

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers: A mute living in the deep south and how he touches the lives of people around him. Some really nice touches - I'm not sure I got the message, if there was one, but basically 4 or 5 great character sketches - truly fully fleshed - in one book.

The Unwomanly Face of War by Svetlana Alexievich: I've now read all of Alexievich's books which have been translated into English so I will need to brush up on my Russian to read the rest. Truly amazing. She takes hundreds of oral testimonies from female soldiers of the Red Army and weaves them into a narrative of genuinely astonishing power. Never read anything like her work - there are passages in this and her other books that are among the most affecting things I've ever read.

The Adventures of Owen Hatherley in the post-Soviet Space by Owen Hatherley: a travel/politics/architecture book. Hatherley goes round the countries of the former Soviet Union and interprets their history, culture and politics both pre and post 1989 through the medium of their architecture. Goes well beyond the fetishization of crumbling brutalist wrecks and communist imagery to give an honest appraisal of the achievements of the old regimes and compares them to what has replaced them. Totally fascinating and Hatherley is a good writer/tour guide.

Currently reading Independence Day by Richard Ford. Estate agent takes a holiday over the 4th of July with his son. Very slow paced, well described and rewarding so far.

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11 minutes ago, welshbairn said:

I've been checking airports the last few months for This Storm in the airport only paperbacks sections, no luck, bit surprised. Might give Marlon James a go. Been meaning to read Brief History of Seven Killings for ages but the text is tiny in my copy and it hurts my head.

Brief History.. should be on tv before long too. 
 

John Crow’s devil is his first book and probably a bit more accessible but still full of sex, violence and repression. His 1950s rural Jamaica reminded me of what 17th century Fife would have been like. Plenty of burnings, rumpy puppy and lynchings.

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Brief History.. should be on tv before long too. 
 
John Crow’s devil is his first book and probably a bit more accessible but still full of sex, violence and repression. His 1950s rural Jamaica reminded me of what 17th century Fife would have been like. Plenty of burnings, rumpy puppy and lynchings.


17th century you say?

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10 hours ago, Shandon Par said:

Brief History.. should be on tv before long too. 
 

John Crow’s devil is his first book and probably a bit more accessible but still full of sex, violence and repression. His 1950s rural Jamaica reminded me of what 17th century Fife would have been like. Plenty of burnings, rumpy puppy and lynchings.

17:00 hundreds , possibly  ...

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17 hours ago, Shandon Par said:

Brief History.. should be on tv before long too. 
 

 

There doesn't seem to be a release date for this yet. 

I only got about halfway through the book a few years ago. I will need to go back and finish it before the series comes out.

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Just now, tongue_tied_danny said:

There doesn't seem to be a release date for this yet. 

I only got about halfway through the book a few years ago. I will need to go back and finish it before the series comes out.

Marlon James was talking about the tv series on a podcast recently and it sounded like it was well under way but doesn't seem to be much about it online. 

No spoilers but there are a lot more than 7 killings but not everyone in the book gets bumped off and of those who make it (at least to the later chapters) some are very likeable characters. Som

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Doggerland- once you get past the disappointing lack of lay-bys this is a cracking wee read. It's like the lighthouse keepers in chewin the fat set in the world of soylent green. The cover has quote comparing it to waiting for godot but that's a shit comparison and shouldn't put you off. 

The Scottish clearances by Tam Devine- A good socio economic analysis of agricultural improvement across Scotland, culminating in the Highland clearances. I felt it was a little unclear on what actually happened in terms of the anti clan measures after culloden but was otherwise fairly comprehensive. It's an accessible history, but I wouldn't say it's a pop history; there is far too much care taken to emphasise how partial records are and to not generalise to be a compelling narrative. 

The annihilation Score by Charles Stross- I read this because of comparisons with Iain m banks, which I didn't get. Imaginative and original but I'm not sure I enjoyed it so much overall, although it had great bits. I think he's trying to bring fantasy horror stuff into Sci fi. Not sure I approve, but am giving another of his a shot to see if it grows on me. 

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Agent Running in the Field by John Le Carré. It’s one of his more accessible books, and it knocks spots off most of his rivals. I preferred A Delicate Truth, but its much better that The Tailor of Panama.

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I've got two lined up ''Budgie' the autobiography of keeper John Burridge.

The other is the SCUM Manifesto by Valerie Solanas which is a radical feminist manifesto which blames men for messing up the world so the solution is to eliminate the male sex. Have you seen the film 'i Shot Andy Warhol'?  @banana :lol:

 

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