Jump to content
H_B

Last Book You Read....

Recommended Posts

That's certainly what many critics thought. As I said myself I did enjoy most of the individual stories - particularly Somni and the Zachary/Meronym (after initially hating the style used) sections - I'm unsure how highly I'd rate it as a whole. It'd be a dull world if we all reacted the same way to something.

here's my review of cloud atlas from this thread a year or so ago.

cloud atlas by david mitchell - it's a novel featuring six different characters at different points in time who's strories are discovered and rediscovered by each other the stories go 1,2,3,4,5,6,5,4,3,2,1. each section is in a different style and mimics different types of fiction and authors, there's a 'moby dick style 19th century sea story, a very dodgy, dandy 1920s composer, a 70s style corporate thriller, a modern day comedy about old age, a futuristic horror story and a post apocolyptic narrative. the mimicry and borrowing was quite frustrating at times and i often felt i'd be better spending my time reading something more original rather than a novel which seemed to be designed to pack lots of different literary elements into the one novel for less discerning readers. on the whole though it was an entertaining read and the deeper theme connecting the characters - that human nature is naturally destructive and it's up to individuals to attempt to overcome it - was rendered well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cobra - Frederick Forsyth

Good read up until the last 10 pages or so. Reading the end, was like having one of them dreams where you know whats going to happen but can't do anything about it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Catcher in the Rye(1951) - J.D Salinger

I picked this book up at the library due to having heard many things about it before, without actually knowing what exactly it was about. Thus, my expectations were quite high. It turns out that I was not disappointed. A very good book, one that I would recommend to anyone else who haven't read it before.

8/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9781408702116.jpg

Read this last week. Quite disturbing story of an Aberdonian man conscripted into the army during World War 2 and his treatment as a prisoner of the Japanese.

Just finished that as well, it's incredible what the Japanese did during the war and basically have tried to deny ever since.

Interesting that the author described how he focused on himself and tried to shut out everyone else and their problems whilst in captivity, I've read two or three similar books and in those the authors would pal up with someone for support to try and get them through the ordeal.

Before that I read "A Journey" by Tony Blair. Almost put the book down while trying to wade through the 50 page (!) introduction, but once he gets in to the story it's a reasonable read. No apology for Iraq of course, but confirms that Gordon Brown (in particular Ed Balls) was undermining the government almost from the off. Having also read Peter Mandelson and Alistair Campbell's books recently as well, if half the stories they tell are true it's incredible they allowed GB to take over in 2007.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

333.jpg

Really enjoying this touring diary type book by the brilliant James Yorkston. Would have finished it today but alas I seem to have lost it. Hopefully I have left it in work yesterday, if not I'll need to buy another copy just for the last chapter :(

Managed to find the book :D

Basically a touring diary by Fife musician James Yorkston. No sex, drugs and rock n roll in here but all the better for it. An honest and sometimes funny account of life on the road of a solo artist. You can almost feel the loneliness at times as Yorkston travels around Northern Europe, guitar in hand and merchandise in bag. This won't win any literary prizes but a nice wee read to pass a few hours.

Now reading ...

Laff by John Boyle. Irish boy growing up in Ferguslie park and his friendship with a boy called Laff. Not long started reading it but seems ok so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: read The Railwayman by Eric(?) Lomax. About dude captured and put to work on Siam-Burma railroad. Interesting bits and insights. Strangely didn't feel much empathy for him, but I guess that wasn't the point.

Bit of a history read at moment. Finest Years by Max Hastings about WSChurchill 40-45. Pretty good.

The Greatest Lies in History by Alexander Canduci. Dispels various widely thought ideas.

Good info and you get a lot of info in each chapter, which deals with a different topic.

Almost finished Magician by Raymond E Feist. Very good if you like sword and sorcery type stuff. Part of trilogy. If you get into it you can power through it.

Got Soldier, tailor, sailor spy in to read list. Really enjoyed movie and picked it up in airport. Could be a slow burner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy

Having seen the film a while back, it all came flooding back whilst reading this.

Excellent!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last book I read was "Intensity" by Dean R. Koontz. The book was really exciting and was a real page turner.

Loved that. The film's not bad too. The guy from Scrubs is the bad guy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished How I became a Famous Novelist last week - enjoyed it a lot, great characterisation, well written funny but also thought provoking. The debate between Pete Tarslaw and Preston Brooks near the end might be one of the most infiriating things I've ver read - in a good way :lol:

The basic premise was a guy sets out to write an "Oprah Book Club" style best seller without any real empathy - just fires out a by the numbers book which he thinks has all the tools to make him rich and famous. I liked the fact the book didnl;t look down on airport novels, but rather the more pretentious novels and writers who look down at them. Good times

Currently working my way through Jonathen Franzen's Freedom which is a pretentious literary novel, but eh, it;s good so shut it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Killer Inside Me - Jim Thompson. The story of a small town sherrif's deputy who is actually a sociopathic killer. It's told first person by Lou, the deputy, and tells the story of how he commits a series of murders and tries to get away with them. The book has a reputation as one of Thompson's most chilling and it's certainly an affecting portrait of someone without a moral compass.

I've seen the film and the book brings out some aspects of the story a lot better - the way that Lou exhibits passive-aggressive tendancies before embarking on his murder spree, most notably by speaking in infuriatingly meaningless cliches all the time, which is only touched on in teh movie.

I'd recommend reading it and am looking forward to reading more Thompson. 8/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not long finished Terry Pratchett's Unseen Academicals. Pokes fun at the thuggish football culture, and generally maintains a level of absurdity throughout that makes this a worthwhile read. Mr Nutt is a great character, and Ridcully and Lord Vetinari work in unusually close quarters. On a football forum, you'd think this book would go down quite well and I know there are a few Pratchett fans here too.

Also read The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Excellent. I've seen a silent film adaption and seen and heard umpteen references to it and at long last got round to reading this. What more can I add other than to say it's reputation is entirely deserved.

Now reading A Clockwork Orange. I've watched and loved the film, and I'm really enjoying the colourful language in the book so far. I'm already certain I'm going to really like this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Catcher in the Rye(1951) - J.D Salinger

I picked this book up at the library due to having heard many things about it before, without actually knowing what exactly it was about. Thus, my expectations were quite high. It turns out that I was not disappointed. A very good book, one that I would recommend to anyone else who haven't read it before.

8/10

the first time i read catcher in the rye i was 15 and thought it was fantastic

the second time i read it i was 32 and just didn't hit the spot anymore

anyone else found this when re-reading books many years later

Edited by Tynieness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the first time i read catcher in the rye i was 15 and thought it was fantastic

the second time i read it i was 32 and just didn't hit the spot anymore

anyone else found this when re-reading books many years later

Yes, i reread "A Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time" last year, having forst read it around 2004/2005. i was underwhelmed second time round, having procliamed it genius upon first reading.

Anyways, finsihed Freedom by Jonathan Franzen. Awffy good. Very sweeping epic americana stuff, which covers a whole host of bases. Bery "liberal" in the american sense of the word though, some might fand rants from characters about enviromentalism or consumerism a bit hard to stomach. It was alos nice to read a supposed "literary" novel, which wasn't beating you over the head with how clever it was being in terms of structure. Even Franzen's prose isn;t particularly spellbinding - a can't remeber a tsand out statement or phrase form the book, it was just all about the charcaters, who felt very rounded, neither liekable nor unlikable.

I even did a wee google on the book afterwards, looking at different people's interpretations and so forth, I don't think you can pay a book higher praise than that to be honest.

'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Readable enough but more Thomas Harris than Thomas Hardy. Not sure I want to read Book 2

The book is part of a trilogy, so unless you really hated it - i'd keep reading. The first part was really just setting the scene for the main part of the story that happens in the other 2 books, and introducing characters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

laff.png

The author, John Boyle tells the story of his school days growing up in Ferguslie Park, Paisley. At school he is ashamed of where he lives but at home he is thought of as a snob because he wears a school uniform. His loneliness and alienation is tempered when he meets a new friend, Laff who is in exactly the same position. They become the best of friends just as Rock n Roll hits Scotland and the boys become old enough to discover girls, alcohol and .... dancing. Pretty funny in places and sad in others but an easy book to read.

Now reading ...

small_island_medium.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the first time i read catcher in the rye i was 15 and thought it was fantastic

the second time i read it i was 32 and just didn't hit the spot anymore

anyone else found this when re-reading books many years later

Well since I am 15 I shall read it again in 17 years and report back to you. wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished L'Etranger by Camus. First time I'd read it since Higher French, when I just found it weird to be honest; now that I'm old enough appreciate it a bit better, I enjoyed it. In terms of language used, it's actually also one of the easier French books to read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...