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Who's Going To Uni?


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Oh go away. Don't you have some Lib Dem figures to be fiddling?

Edited to add, this is the short version of a discussion about how knowledge shouldn't cost, the benefits of higher education to society in general, and also the development of transferable skills Oh, and how we shouldn't be charging again for education. But I'm having a busy day! :P

I must admit, I always wanted to do geology but my careers dept at school in the Central Belt told me that the pay was shite and jobs were sparse, hence I decided to go for option two and that was engineering (see story on previous page I can't be arsed saying again). Anyway, during my first year in Aberdeen, I realised that seeing as the whole oil industry is in the business of understanding and producing from rocks, there were actually a shitload of related (and rather well payed) jobs to be had and I quickly tried to jump ship, eventually starting Geology in second year after a lot of arm-twisting over first year prerequisites etc.

All in all, I wouldn't have done my first choice subject had there not been a decent job at the end of it which could pay back all the loans etc. Those that go into uni because they don't know what else to do, expecting the taxpayers to fund it need a bit of a slap imo, that and that Central Belt understanding of the hydrocarbon industry is shite.

Edited by Hedgecutter
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Maybe he just wanted to do history and found it interesting? To use an example, HB has said that he works in IT (IIRC), but has a law degree. People don't HAVE to be limited to history related jobs because they did a history degree. Uni should be learning more

about something you find interesting, not a job shop.

That's fair enough doing something you enjoy. I just know someone who got an Honours history degree from Strathclyde because he enjoyed it but can't get a job anywhere and has no idea what the degree is actually useful for in helping him get a job.

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That's fair enough doing something you enjoy. I just know someone who got an Honours history degree from Strathclyde because he enjoyed it but can't get a job anywhere and has no idea what the degree is actually useful for in helping him get a job.

Well maybe he needs to think very carefully about what he learned during his degree? If he worked hard at it, he should have learned some skills about self motivation, about being able to learn new skills, about problem solving, independent working, etc. etc. Its all about selling it. Plus, as I said, a degree shouldn't be considered as a one step route to a job. Take graduate jobs for example, they consist of, err, retraining graduates, often from scratch. The point of having a good degree is it shows you are willing to learn, that you are capable of working independently, and that you should theoretically be capable of mastering other areas.

Your friend probably needs to work on his salesmanship skills.

Edited to add, of course, there are jobs that require specific degrees, i.e. medicine, but I was meaning in general!

Edited by xbl
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Also to add my point to the argument over unis on this page, I chose Glasgow over Strathy, Edinburgh etc because the West End is IMO a much nicer place to live than where Strathy Halls were as well as the prestige that a degree from Glasgow carries.

Prestige depends on departments, not the institution as a whole. Glasgow's history programme on the whole is medieval guesswork IMO.

You don't need to get a History degree to "learn about something you find interesting". You certainly don't need the taxpayer to foot the bill.

Dry your eyes.

That's fair enough doing something you enjoy. I just know someone who got an Honours history degree from Strathclyde because he enjoyed it but can't get a job anywhere and has no idea what the degree is actually useful for in helping him get a job.

What category of Honours? It should be abundantly clear by now that getting a degree, regardless of the institution is not of itself a credible job ticket. Which is also a frankly dreadful understanding of what university education is about.

Edited by vikingTON
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What kind of career does a history degree lead into?

Journalism, politics etc.

Although many of the big graduate recruiters, such as consultancies and accountants, would accept degrees of any discipline - it is the smaller ones that tend to specify.

I want to stay in Glasgow but Glasgow Uni itself seems a wee bit pretentious.

Wow, you sound like a massive twat.

I wish I'd gone to Edinburgh tbh.

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Got unconditionals for Business Economics and Economics at Glasgow and I'm planning to accept one of them. Think they're pretty much the same for the first two years but I stuck them both down on the form anyway. Reckon I'll probably do whichever one I pick with Maths and Stats or maybe Business. Pleasing.

Edited by Meathead
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Got unconditionals for Business Economics and Economics at Glasgow and I'm planning to accept one of them. Think they're pretty much the same for the first two years but I stuck them both down on the form anyway. Reckon I'll probably do whichever one I pick with Maths and Stats or maybe Business. Pleasing.

I think I signed up for business economics initially.

Got the f**k out of that ASAP.

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You don't need to get a History degree to "learn about something you find interesting". You certainly don't need the taxpayer to foot the bill.

Had to reply to this on the off chance that anyone sees it and changes their mind on their choice of degree. I have friends who decided to study things such as Law and the more 'prestigious' degrees who don't really have any interest in the subject and they dread going into uni most days, whereas those who chose to study something because they have an interest in the subject are the ones who enjoy their classes and even tend to do better in their exams. Basically what I'm saying is choosing your degree because you think the job prospects may be better is a terrible idea. My degree is in Geography and Italian and I'm currently in my 4th year abroad and I love it. When I come out of it at the end I'm unlikely to have a huge list of employers looking to snap me up but this doesn't really bother me because I've enjoyed my time at uni and I know that most other subjects wouldn't have held my interest the way the ones I have chosen do. Pick something you actually like.

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Basically what I'm saying is choosing your degree because you think the job prospects may be better is a terrible idea.

No it isn't. It's a very sensible idea.

University is easy. It doesn't really matter what you do. You might as well come out at the end with a degree that is going to get you a job, rather than one which isn't.

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No it isn't. It's a very sensible idea.

University is easy. It doesn't really matter what you do. You might as well come out at the end with a degree that is going to get you a job, rather than one which isn't.

I agree that university is fairly easy. In my experience however which I'm willing to accept is clearly less than yours, those who I know who are studying things because they were told the job prospects were better tend to be miserable and have a much higher rate of dropping out than those who are studying a subject because they like it. What I meant by that post wasn't necessarily that choosing your degree based on the job prospects is a bad idea (although I'd recommend being highly motivated if you're not really interested in it), rather that if there is something which you really have an interest in studying then you should go for it instead of worrying about what will happen at the end of it because you're much more likely to enjoy your time at university.

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I agree that university is fairly easy. In my experience however which I'm willing to accept is clearly less than yours, those who I know who are studying things because they were told the job prospects were better tend to be miserable and have a much higher rate of dropping out than those who are studying a subject because they like it.

I think a lot of people drop out of University for very different reasons. A number of people in my year dropped out, or changed courses, because it was either too difficult for them, they didn't like the course, they took to their new found lifestyle a bit too much and never attended etc.

A lot of people want to go to University, but aren't that fussed what they do, or just have no idea. I was a bit like that - I did Law, but it wasn't through a burning desire to be a lawyer.

I wouldn't say that single-mindedly saying "I hate English at high school and Law sounds terrible, but it's a great degree for job prospects so I'm going to grit my teeth and survive the 5 years" is at all wise, but by the same token, if you want to go to University and have no real idea what you want to do, then picking a degree with good job prospects is eminently sensible.

I'm delighted with my choice of both subject and University. I wouldn't have wanted to live anywhere other than the West End, I wanted as long a degree as possible because Uni is a skiver's dream, and the cherry on top was that it was easy for me to get a job at the end of it once the good times were over.

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Had to reply to this on the off chance that anyone sees it and changes their mind on their choice of degree. I have friends who decided to study things such as Law and the more 'prestigious' degrees who don't really have any interest in the subject and they dread going into uni most days, whereas those who chose to study something because they have an interest in the subject are the ones who enjoy their classes and even tend to do better in their exams. Basically what I'm saying is choosing your degree because you think the job prospects may be better is a terrible idea. My degree is in Geography and Italian and I'm currently in my 4th year abroad and I love it. When I come out of it at the end I'm unlikely to have a huge list of employers looking to snap me up but this doesn't really bother me because I've enjoyed my time at uni and I know that most other subjects wouldn't have held my interest the way the ones I have chosen do. Pick something you actually like.

This post is rendered irrelevant by the fact that wanting to learn about law for the sake of it doesn't require the taxpayer to pay for your degree either, or indeed for you to get a degree.

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I did an English degree and I am more aware and more intelligent for it. I don't specifically use my English degree every day, but the skills I learned in it in terms of researching and producing work have been invaluable in every job I've had.

I presume ad lib attempts to bam up everyone involved in the things he doesn't think the taxpayer should be footing the bill for? The idea that taxation shouldn't be used for education is hilarious.

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Fire alarm at the library today, absolute pandemonium.

I was there. People were queueing for the lift. laugh.gif

I was down the stairs eating my lunch. Had to go outside holding a lunchbox. It's fucking impossible to look cool in front of the numerous good looking girls in the Edinburgh University library with a plastic lunchbox containing a single bar of dairy milk under your arm. Thankfully I met my mate outside or I'd have been standing there by myself for the 25 minutes which would've made it even worse.

I must have just missed this as I left the library at half 12 to go to Kings Buildings. Pleasing.

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Had to reply to this on the off chance that anyone sees it and changes their mind on their choice of degree. I have friends who decided to study things such as Law and the more 'prestigious' degrees who don't really have any interest in the subject and they dread going into uni most days, whereas those who chose to study something because they have an interest in the subject are the ones who enjoy their classes and even tend to do better in their exams. Basically what I'm saying is choosing your degree because you think the job prospects may be better is a terrible idea. My degree is in Geography and Italian and I'm currently in my 4th year abroad and I love it. When I come out of it at the end I'm unlikely to have a huge list of employers looking to snap me up but this doesn't really bother me because I've enjoyed my time at uni and I know that most other subjects wouldn't have held my interest the way the ones I have chosen do. Pick something you actually like.

Got to agree with this. Although job prospects ultimately changed my degree choice, I wouldn't have done it had I not been interested. My subject was always my hobby which made it much easier to be motivated etc etc and read up about it outside uni. The problem now is that because my work is my hobby, it's pretty hard to distinguish what's recreation and recreation for work! However, I often forget that I'm in the very jammy jammy minority that actually enjoys my work. It's pretty sad though that I can be on a holiday and feel that it's time to get back to work though.

I recently went to Riva del Garda a couple of months ago and it became just as much a work related study as a holiday. smile.gifsad.gif

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I think a lot of people drop out of University for very different reasons. A number of people in my year dropped out, or changed courses, because it was either too difficult for them, they didn't like the course, they took to their new found lifestyle a bit too much and never attended etc.

A lot of people want to go to University, but aren't that fussed what they do, or just have no idea. I was a bit like that - I did Law, but it wasn't through a burning desire to be a lawyer.

I wouldn't say that single-mindedly saying "I hate English at high school and Law sounds terrible, but it's a great degree for job prospects so I'm going to grit my teeth and survive the 5 years" is at all wise, but by the same token, if you want to go to University and have no real idea what you want to do, then picking a degree with good job prospects is eminently sensible.

I'm delighted with my choice of both subject and University. I wouldn't have wanted to live anywhere other than the West End, I wanted as long a degree as possible because Uni is a skiver's dream, and the cherry on top was that it was easy for me to get a job at the end of it once the good times were over.

I agree with all of that. You're fortunate in that an area of study you happened to enjoy also benefits from being one of the most sought after degrees by employers.

This post is rendered irrelevant by the fact that wanting to learn about law for the sake of it doesn't require the taxpayer to pay for your degree either, or indeed for you to get a degree.

See above. I never ever said that you can't enjoy a degree in law, I just used it as an example. If someone likes it, that's great.

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I agree with all of that. You're fortunate in that an area of study you happened to enjoy also benefits from being one of the most sought after degrees by employers.

It wasn't that much that I enjoyed the degree. It was OK. It was really easy.

Given a choice, all things being equal, I'd probably have done an English Literature degree. But I knew that would be a career limiting move.

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No, because I'm not here to defend everything the Lib Dems say or do. Unlike you and Salmond ;)

Knowledge doesn't cost; teaching facilities and supplementary support do.

Bread helps society in general, but the state doesn't hand that out to the kids of millionaires.

Transferable skills can be acquired by a great number of means other than University.

Oh and we charge for education in every other optional sphere of education already, so why shouldn't we with University. Music lessons, tutors, summer schools, professional development courses (paid by employer to supplier), Rosetta Stone CDs: university education is no different on principle or in practice.

Be less busy.

By your logic we should charge for primary and secondary education....fruitcake. Investment in education is more than recouped via income tax of graduates. As far as I'm concerned I've been a taxpayer for 30 years and I've decided to go to Uni. I've more than paid my way thank you.

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