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Cornishman

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About Cornishman

  • Rank
    Sunday League Starter
  • Birthday 15/01/1964

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Malvern
  • Interests
    Non-League footy
    Stamp Collecting
    Reading
    (ex) Cartoonist
    Poet/Songwriter
    Cartophile (maps)
  • My Team
    Ross County
  1. Thought 'Fourth Lanark FC' might've been a good one! lol
  2. There have been many splendid ideas and proposals aired on this thread (which I've 'lurked' on for some time!). I'd now like to present my own modest proposal... If one arranges a Division first into two (random?/regional?/league-place-ordered?) Conferences, followed by a halfway split & recombination into an 'upper/lower' pair of Conferences, one may operate Divisions with precisely 4/3rds. the number of teams in them compared to regular double-round-robin structured Divisions. This works as long as the total number of teams is divisible by four and results of all head-to-heads among qualified teams from the preliminary Conferences are retained in the upper/lower Conferences. Ergo, we could have 24-team Divisions, playing a 34-match season... &/or... 28-team Divisions, playing a 40-match season. That would respectively give 22/26 games each in the preliminary Conferences; 6/7 teams carry over their 10/12 head-to-head results; then the upper/lower Conferences kick-off with halfish-completed league tables and are finished via the teams playing their final 12/14 games versus those they've not yet played in the present season. 22+12/26+14. The 'Premer Division' can, of course, be 'fixed' to provide the Glasgow OF pair with their four fixtures against each other (presuming that they both end up in the same upper or lower Conference for the end of season run-in!). Advantages of this system... (i)... Allows 1/3rd. more teams to compete in higher prestige League matches. (ii).. Can provide high-interest derby matches in the first period of the season - if Conferences are split regionally. (iii). The first period of the season Conferences 'split' exactly halfway through the middle, providing for that split to be made right at the point where statistically the highest number of teams with the closest points totals reside. Creating extra will-they/won't-they excitement for very many fans. (iv).. The system provides a natural break at just the right time of year for the 'winter break' (v)... There will be 'peril' for the last-placed team in the upper Conference, in the form of having to participate in promotion/relegation playoffs. There will also be 'reward' to be earned - in the form of playoffs for the top-2 in the lower Conference toward gaining Europa League entry. (vi).. The upper Conference would be competing for the usual prizes & European competition entry, noting that the lowest of the would-be Europa League qualifiers would still be required to win playoffs versus the two best teams from the lower Conference (EoS-2018-19-style probably). Depending on the number of relegation places decreed in the League's rules; here I'm assuming four direct relegations and one or two playoff places; there will be a 'direct relegation line' drawn above the fourth-from-bottom position and a 'playoff zone line' drawn above either the 5th./6th.-from-bottom position - that dependent on whether a preliminary playoff be required between 6th.-bottom and 12th. from the upper Conference. (vii). Competition prize money will be awarded strictly pro-rata, based on 'total points won over the 34/40 matches of the season'. Disadvantages of this system... (i)... The pattern of matches to be played might be a little tricky to understand by some, particularly in its inception season. Well, there you have it. Not really that complex, yet still exercising for the old grey matter! I would allow for just the one national Division, with each subsequent tier dividing the tier above in half in regional, then area and maybe district based Divisions/Conferences. I'd suspect that the 24-team model would be more popular than the 28-team one. If someone wishes to illustrate my model with spreadsheets/maps - feel free. It's not copyrighted and doing such things exceeds my capabilities! lol. Hope folks enjoy perusing and pondering on my modest model.
  3. Sorry, mcruic. There will probably never be more than two direct regional feeders into the SPFL - the latter originally baulked the two-feeder idea and only upon the creation of the LFL did they unwillingly come into line step.
  4. Average English 'tier 5' attendance for 2018-19 was just under 2000.
  5. If Premier gains an LL club without promoting one back, let it play with 17 club membership for the following season, adding one extra relegation place for that following season. Regular relegation ought to be bottom three + fourth-bottom to participate in a play-out versus three First Division teams. In First Division, three champions promoted + three sets of playoffs between 2nd. to 5th.-placed sides, the three winners of which then join Premier-13th. in that play-out. If any First Division teams in top-5 cannot for any reason accept a promotion, then qualification in their division would simply drop by one place. If more than one club cannot accept promotion, then after the above, the playoff 'zone' would be reduced accordingly, never taking lower than 6th.-place finishers. In the first instance, the topmost playoff qualifier would receive a bye in the first playoff round. Were a First Division to entirely fail to produce a champion, it would be unable also to provide a playoff challenger. In this case, direct relegation would be reduced by one and the reprieved 14th.-placed team would instead join the 13th.-placed team in the play-outs. If that First Division instead promotes a champion, but has no playoff candidate, then Premier-13th. team will receive a bye in the first play-out round. For any further 'inabilities to promote, priority will then be given to reprieves, dropping play-out places down the Premier table and sorting playoff qualifiers on a PPG basis. NB* - 'Champion' in above references implies 'highest placed First Division team which is able to accept promotion'!
  6. This is a fine effort but alongside other commenters, I think that the B-team/Colts inclusion should be canned. A major problem I perceive with the Pyramid idea is that it's all fine and well providing promotion opportunities, but what one is being promoted into must be an attractive proposition in the first place... and personally, I don't think the SPFL structure is all that attractive. Barely more than half of clubs in the SPFL appear capable of sustaining full-time professionalism and it's my contention that maybe the SPFL should 'trim' itself down and concentrate these into two nationwide divisions of say 12 Premier & 18 Division 1 clubs - allowing some space here for the stronger semi-professionals. The remaining dozen clubs would be embraced into the current HL/LL tier of 2x 18 clubs, with ten dropping from this level into the first properly non-league tier which would be formed from the backbone of the present SJFL topmost divisions, topped-up by a few EoSL clubs. In the interests of both league strength parity and footprint hinterland equality, I'd reset the borderline between North Region and the others to the determinant of travel proximity to either Perth/Dundee on one hand and Stirling/Queensferry on the other (which would also apply to the HL/LL tier above). This would add about 15/16 clubs to the North, while the East Region would partially mitigate its loss in numbers from the West Region. The SoSL, North Caledonian League and lower EoSL clubs would be absorbed at appropriate tiers in the remaining SJFL set up.
  7. Groundhoppers have a general 'rule' that they follow in which they can estimate playing strengths of unknown teams; at least throughout Europe; which while not perfect can be surprisingly accurate... They compare average crowds as it's a truism that across the continent, clubs with similar spectator attractiveness tend to operate at similar playing strengths.
  8. Are (m)any other Amateurs seriously considering 'doing a Gartcosh' in the near future?
  9. Going back to the mid to late '70s in (as Zimbabwe was then known) Rhodesia, there was a team called, 'Glens Strikers' who competed in the Rhodesia National Football League (Northern Section) Division 5 in the '76 season. That year they won 34 straight League matches, most by a margin of 10-20 goals and a couple exceeding 20. They were jump-promoted to Division 2 for the '77 season and repeated another 100% win record over 38 more League games, most victories now in the 6 to 12 goal margin. In the '78 season, again jump-promoted two levels, they finally met with some matching resistance in their new (Northern Section) Premier Division League surroundings and now, entry into the RNFA Cup. In this season they still won all but four of 38 League matches, drawing the others and then went on to win playoffs for the right to enter the RNFL's flagship National Division. They were defeated just the once in the Cup, having been drawn against strong National Division opponents. In the '79 season, they were a poor to middling outfit in the National Division and after that, I lost track of footie in that country. That was an admirable playing record most certainly, but to be honest even that cannot be guaranteed being 'THE' Zimbabwean record, as runs such as these are reasonably common in African organised lower divisional football, and must also be so in equivalent echelons worldwide! For reference purposes, ignoring top-level professional African teams, most football there is strictly of Scottish amateurs-equivalent status.
  10. But that ignores the fact that the SPFL will not sanction a three feeder Level-5 and needed much persuasion to accept the two feeder system. Only way around it that I see is a hybrid LL structure with 24 teams that are split into West & East Conferences, playing 22 matches up to the New Year. After that, the two top-6s are recombined, carrying over just their head-to-head records, then each of the Wests plays each of the Easts home/away in a further round dozen games. The two bottom-6s could be similarly recombined, or each might just carry on playing a second ten match round robin to add to their prior head-to-heads. Season would be 34 (or 32) matches long, equating to the HL schedule. Juniors 'get' their 2x LLs & only six away matches outside their subregion in the second part of the season. SPFL should be satisfied (-ish) with this structure, hopefully not pulling the plug on the promotion/relegation play-off because of it.
  11. Splendid proposal... but is neglecting/ignoring the Tay boundary, which really ought to be factored in. Excluding Jeanfield, Kinnoul, Luncarty & Scone - all whom could be included, there are 15 East Region clubs North of the Tay. Were these fifteen, plus the eight NCL clubs persuaded/co-opted into the North Junior set up, it would become 60-teams strong. That would allow the North Juniors to operate their league clubs' distribution the same way as the East Juniors currently operate. i.e. a 'top division' + middle division + two regional bottom divisions. These would be of 16, 16, 14 & 14 clubs respectively. I'd envisage East Juniors' losses compensated by absorbing the 11 EoS clubs, plus about 10/12 West Junior transfers as the latter absorb the 14 SoS clubs. All three Regions would thus 'own' 60-70 clubs each. Based on 2015-16 finishing positions (excepting Montrose Roselea's awkward Region jump!) , the North Region set up would resemble something like:- Premier Division Banks o' Dee Broughty Athletic Carnoustie Panmure Culter Deveronside Downfield Juniors Dufftown Dundee Violet Dyce Juniors Forfar West End Hall Russell United Hermes Inverness City Lochee United Maud Juniors Stonehaven Juniors First Division (Aberdeen)* East End Banchory St. Ternan Blairgowrie Juniors Buchanhaven Hearts Buckie Rovers Colony Park Dundee East Craigie Dundee North End Ellon United Forres Thistle Fraserburgh United Islavale Kirriemuir Thistle Nairn St. Ninian Newburgh Thistle Stoneywood Parkvale West Division Alness United Burghead Thistle Fochabers Juniors Forres Thistle Golspie Sutherland Halkirk United Invergordon Inverness Athletic (Kirkwall)* Orkney Nairn St. Ninian New Elgin Spey Valley United Tain St. Duthus Thurso East Division Aberdeen University Arbroath Victoria Brechin Victoria Coupar Angus Cruden Bay Juniors Forfar Albion Glentanar Lewis United Lochee Harp Longside Montrose Roselea Newmachar United Sunnybank Whitehills *- Bracketed = location info. only, not indicating name change! Personally, I think this set up could work really well and serve as an excellent feeder to the HFL. If need be it retains spare room to absorb four more clubs; thinking if/when the HFL has to 'shed' an occasional club; and if using three 'levels' of the football system is deemed too many layers, then 'Premier' & 'First' might otherwise instead be combined and also split regionally or the 'First', 'West' & 'East' combined to split 'West', 'East' & 'South'. Either model would work. The North Region's top division should be very much strengthened in comparison with those of the other two Regions, although probably still somewhat beneath par. I may do a quick study on what East & West Regions look like if the North was boosted as above... but not right now as it's wee hours already! Critique welcome.
  12. Dalbeattie Star 0 - 1 Cumbernauld Colts East Kilbride 4 - 0 Selkirk East Stirlingshire 2 - 0 Vale of Leithen Gala Fairydean Rovers 1 - 1 University of Stirling Gretna 2008 4 - 1 Civil Service Strollers Hawick Royal Albert 2 - 1 Whitehill Welfare Preston Athletic 0 - 2 BSC Glasgow Spartans 5 - 0 Edinburgh University
  13. There IS a 'hybrid' league structuring idea out there which could possibly answer a fair few of the LL's problems concerning engagement with both the East/West Juniors and the SPFL. Firstly, the SPFL isn't going to buy into a three-Region feeder system; the two-Region HL/LL system was already a huge compromise upon the SPFL's (or predecessor's) part, as they were originally only interested in there being a single nationwide feeder. After which, we all know the Juniors' hangup on this issue. The hybrid idea will sew together both sides of these opposing demands with hopefully a little bit of cooperation and willingness to compromise. The league would need to be expanded to 24 teams which would play over two separate phases, divided perhaps by a winter break. Phase 1 would split the 24 into East & West Conferences of 12, each completing the normal complete double round robin of 22 matches. Phase 2 would then see the top-6 from both Conferences being re-pooled into a new 'Championship Conference', each team retaining (just) the results previously garnered against the other 5 teams in this new Conference whom they played against in Phase 1. Phase 2 fixtures would then simply resolve into H/A matches versus the 6 teams not already played against = 12 more matches for a 34-match season. Also in Phase 2 the two Regional bottom-6s could (i) be recombined into a 'Relegation Conference', competed over the same terms as above. OR, (ii) the two regional bottom-6's could simply stay separated and complete a second complete double round robin of a further 10 matches. Giving a 32-match total. A third, more complex idea would be to combine each of the Regional bottom-6s with top-6s from wholly Regional subsidiary divisions... but ultimately following this path will always make sub-regionalisation at successive lower levels quite awkward, without at some level having to invoke (ii) above anyway. While this hybrid concept is a little left-field at first glance, it's actually pretty similar to the SPFL's Premiership schedule ~ substituting a 2nd. Phase 2 RR for the 3rd. Phase 1 RR. It supports advantages, too, over & above extra 'Phase winner' Trophies. The split at halfway down the table at end of Phase 1 is 'special' as approaching the 22nd. game the battle for 6th. or better places will on statistical average involve the greatest number of teams. Ergo spread spectator interest further.
  14. There IS a 'hybrid' league structuring idea out there which could possibly answer a fair few of the LL's problems concerning engagement with both the East/West Juniors and the SPFL. Firstly, the SPFL isn't going to buy into a three-Region feeder system; the two-Region HL/LL system was already a huge compromise upon the SPFL's (or predecessor's) part, as they were originally only interested in there being a single nationwide feeder. After which, we all know the Juniors' hangup on this issue. The hybrid idea will sew together both sides of these opposing demands with hopefully a little bit of cooperation and willingness to compromise. The league would need to be expanded to 24 teams which would play over two separate phases, divided perhaps by a winter break. Phase 1 would split the 24 into East & West Conferences of 12, each completing the normal complete double round robin of 22 matches. Phase 2 would then see the top-6 from both Conferences being re-pooled into a new 'Championship Conference', each team retaining (just) the results previously garnered against the other 5 teams in this new Conference whom they played against in Phase 1. Phase 2 fixtures would then simply resolve into H/A matches versus the 6 teams not already played against = 12 more matches for a 34-match season. Also in Phase 2 the two Regional bottom-6s could (i) be recombined into a 'Relegation Conference', competed over the same terms as above. OR, (ii) the two regional bottom-6's could simply stay separated and complete a second complete double round robin of a further 10 matches. Giving a 32-match total. A third, more complex idea would be to combine each of the Regional bottom-6s with top-6s from wholly Regional subsidiary divisions... but ultimately following this path will always make sub-regionalisation at successive lower levels quite awkward, without at some level having to invoke (ii) above anyway. While this hybrid concept is a little left-field at first glance, it's actually pretty similar to the SPFL's Premiership schedule ~ substituting a 2nd. Phase 2 RR for the 3rd. Phase 1 RR. It supports advantages, too, over & above extra 'Phase winner' Trophies. The split at halfway down the table at end of Phase 1 is 'special' as approaching the 22nd. game the battle for 6th. or better places will on statistical average involve the greatest number of teams. Ergo spread spectator interest further.
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