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Showing content with the highest reputation on 20/05/14 in all areas

  1. I take a completely different view to Baird leaving. We signed him once and he left for more money and a chance at the SPL. He proved he couldn't cut it at that level for 2 teams and his career was going absolutely nowhere until we rescued him in January. He has shown absolutely nothing to this club and his decision to go and effectively sign for one of our rivals next season shows all his badge kissing and his cup final celebration was just all for show. He clearly wanted to sign for the Pars a few seasons ago and has held a slight ill feeling towards us since then. Was told by a reliable source that both himself and our board took a bit of convincing for a contact to be signed in January. No best wishes from me and nothing against Queens here. But basically Baird is a little twat!
    4 points
  2. I'd never heard much anti-semitism before moving to Glasgow, but here there seems to be loads of it, usually disguised as 'Pro-Palestine', but you read the literature and half of it is clearly just anti-Jewish prejudice.
    4 points
  3. To be honest if you answered one of those as "yes" you're probably anti-Semitic.
    4 points
  4. It's a been a great day on Twitter and Facebook. He's has some pelters.
    4 points
  5. I thought a lot of african footballers were quite happy to hide their birthdays no?
    4 points
  6. Some Raith fans wax lyrical about him
    3 points
  7. It's now officially YaYa Toure-ette's Syndrome.
    3 points
  8. Further..... Having recognised the above as accurate, the collective sphincters at the SFA had a collective meltdown at the prospect of the loss of what they perceived as the be all and end all of the game in Scotland....The Old Firm fixtures and their monetary value. In their shock filled and horrified state they did all in their power to shoe-horn the disgraced outfit into as elevated a position as possible in order to get the Gruesome Twosome back together. Thankfully and rightfully this failed. Only AFTER having been forced into a position of common sense by a combination of popular demand and a compliant, better focused, set of Chairmen, the SFA set about consciously and deliberately rewriting their rulebook to create a rule allowing them to seperately recognise a football club from it's governing corporate owner.......creating the continuity myth which would allow them to re-establish the aforementioned "great rivalry" of the Old Firm after the 'inconvenience' of the interruption caused by the debacle in Govan. This would then, they theorised, give them the marketing tool they wanted to illicit more finance from TV companies. The ongoing clusterfuck at Sevco 5088/Scotland t/a The Rangers FC must be doing their tiny little heads in. Good.
    3 points
  9. Everyone needs to watch this video, twice.
    3 points
  10. ^^^ poacher turned gamekeeper.
    2 points
  11. Nobody really gives a f**k.
    2 points
  12. They were originally planning to play Sevco, until someone told them...they don't do Woking away.
    2 points
  13. Peter Coleman jimmy cook davie Wilson were all useful corner takers but.Charlie gallagher and chic charnley could drop a ball on a sixpence from fifty yards.
    2 points
  14. Every question has "jews" as a premis so the asumption is that all Jews are the same. Imo the quiz is anti Semitic.
    2 points
  15. Disappointing stuff about Baird but no need to press the panic button just yet. There will be lots of coming and goings over the summer and the team will take shape eventually. I know it is all about opinions but with the Championship shaping up the way it is anyone talking about not renewing their season ticket is crazy. Also the folk talking about us being automatically relegated are forgetting that we'll have a Hartley less Alloa and Cowden (mins Hemmings and Stewart) in our league. Keep the heid people
    2 points
  16. Jeremy Beadle reportedly had a small cock. On the other hand, it was massive. I'm here all week, try the lamb.
    2 points
  17. I heard about this last week, wasn't sure if it was true Pretty disgraceful Sevco are getting special treatment and taking money out the game
    2 points
  18. What was the potato factory like though?
    2 points
  19. 2 points
  20. Why are supporters of a club called Inter buying AC tops?
    2 points
  21. And saw that English clubs that kept their history after an insolvency event had either sold the club DURING administration BEFORE the deadline..or having failed to get a CVA agreed with their creditors went on to pay that CVA rate to all their creditors anyway via the FA...none of these happened to rangers they died .
    2 points
  22. I do not have to pretend everthing is perfect to qualify as a supporter.I am a life long , die hard who just happens to smell something fishy with this statement . I have yet to see a private company spending money seemingly 'needlessly ' on replacing a pitch only a year old that is apparently performing ' well' and for no charge. With these benevolent acts of kindness, I don't expect this private company - ie profit making - to be around that long . Anyway , I can't be arsed with you so will you block me please .
    2 points
  23. The most stupid/sad/pathetice/cringe on this thread is not Scots supporting England, or ABE, it's the pish you all throw at each other. If a Scot (as I do) chooses to support England, so what. If a Scot (as I did) chooses to support ABE, so what. Get over yourselves. you stupid, sad pathetic little people. I'm cringing for you all.
    2 points
  24. 2 points
  25. Left back aye. He's a pretty solid player, likes to get forward and has good delivery. His pace isn't great and he can get caught out at times, not the greatest defender but does a solid enough job. I like him and I hope we can hold on to him.
    2 points
  26. That's a touch unfair Willie, they also held up red bits of paper, waddled to Hampden, made a list of their enemies, and threatened directors of other clubs who give their free time to administer our game. Must have seemed like a good idea at the time.
    2 points
  27. You can only buy shares if those holding the shares wish to sell. Rangers supporters have put in tens of millions into the club over the last couple of seasons through Season Ticket sales and Share Issue.
    2 points
  28. It won't. We've been saying this is the most important appointment Rae's had to make. Get it right with a good manager, we could go straight back up and re-establish ourselves in the Championship, get it wrong with an average manager we'll fail to go up at the first attempt and more than likely become an Ayr United with the occasional foray up to the Championship where we're always relegated, get it wrong with a terrible manager and we could easily end up sliding as badly as Clyde have or even worse. We've appointed Jim Duffy, who's worse than terrible. This story ends with Morton in the Lowland League.
    2 points
  29. 'Rangers' wasn't run by a company. 'Rangers' was a company.
    2 points
  30. a bit quiet on here right now so... I walked into a bar in Glasgow and this massive mental looking bloke came over to me. He had a Celtic FC tattoo across his forehead. He leaned into my face and growled, " So, what fucken team do you support, then?" "Celtic, obviously," I replied His face went purple with rage and he roared, "Well I'm a Rangers fan and some of your mob did this to ma heed." That's the last thing I remember...
    2 points
  31. Will Smith Declined the lead role in The Matrix for the Lead role in Wild Wild West, not because he thought the latter was the stronger film, he was fully aware of how successful and iconic The Matrix was to become, its simply that Will Smith is such a fan of Tina Turner and the film 'What's Love got to do with it?' that he genuinely believes that Laurence Fishburne is in fact Ike Turner and wants no association with the man.
    2 points
  32. 2 points
  33. You know, it appears to me, that we could be about to experience a season, where the horde will actually be bragging about how low their attendances are. No8 says -''We only got 10,210 for the Raith game and I'm hoping we'll have a couple of thousand less for the visit of Falkirk. Great stuff lads.'' Tedi says - ''Aye, would be a fantastic achievement to get below the 10K mark.''
    2 points
  34. PeitroPierrePedro ‏@petethefoot 3h Raith Rovers website punting ST's ) "We look forward to welcoming Hearts, and of course Ramsdens Cup Runners Up Rangers to Stark’s Park next season."
    2 points
  35. Had to be done, apologies in advance
    2 points
  36. 2 points
  37. 1 point
  38. Lindisfarne - Lady Elinor
    1 point
  39. If any c**t fancies a 'square go' in the shower area....Duffy's your man.
    1 point
  40. It's quite amusing how different the posts on this thread would be if Galloway was a Yes-ite.
    1 point
  41. Longworth staying on for next season am sure you will be glad to know
    1 point
  42. Chris Spedding - Motorbiking
    1 point
  43. 9. Christopher Nolan One of the major names of this generation and one of the most successful writer-directors of all time in the thriller genre, this director has only been active for a little over 15 years but he's already brought us a number of masterpieces, and created a refreshing new wave of cerebral cinema. In a time of too many mainstream films insulting their audience's intelligence Christopher Nolan is one of very few to keep bringing originality and complicated narratives into blockbuster films. From very early in his career he's found a balance between creating entertainment and pushing cinematic boundaries, with results that are both visually exciting and commercially appealing. Nolan is another product of the Super 8 generation. With an American mother and British father he spent time on both sides of the Atlantic but he was born and educated in England, and began experimenting with his dad's 8mm camera from a very early age. After school he attended UCL, where he studied English literature and was a very enthusiastic member of the film society, taking full advantage of the availability of 16mm cameras and an editing suite, even putting on his own screenings of major feature films to raise money to shoot his own short films. After leaving university, and working briefly making corporate and industrial films, he attempted his first independent short film, Doodlebug, which he wrote, produced, directed, designed, filmed and edited himself. He served in most of those roles again for his first feature film, Following, a noiresque character thriller in which a struggling writer looking for inspiration becomes obsessed with following random people around London, but runs into trouble after unknowingly pursuing a criminal. Made on a shoestring budget of £3,000, Nolan cut costs everywhere he could, rehearsing every scene thoroughly so they could be filmed in as few takes as possible and relying on natural light for most scenes (which was one of the main reasons for Nolan choosing to film in black-and-white), but the film's genius is his assembly of those scenes- the non-linear narrative not only builds suspense and hides crucial elements of the plot until the final twist, but also makes the characters all the more fascinating, as we discover more about them in little pieces. Spookily there are also a few prophecies in the film, including a prominent Batman symbol and a character named Cobb. After the excellent reception of Following, in order to pursue his career in film Nolan, along with his younger brother Jonathan, moved to America. On a road trip together, Jonathan pitched a short story idea to Christopher, about a man whose short-term memory loss impedes his attempt to avenge his wife's murder, and his dependence on mementos: notes, photographs and tattoos, to carry out his mission. The short story became Memento, an ingenious thriller which combines the genuinely intelligent crime plot with a completely original narrative. Primarily the film is told in two inter-cutting parts: one revealing the character's back story (told chronologically, in black and white) and one showing how he did it (told backwards, beginning with the vengeance kill, in colour) connected by an ever-confused voice-over of what's going on in the hero's mind. The short sections, as well as moving the story along in a unique way, help personify the main character's memory span and put the viewer in his shoes as sincerely and directly as possible. The film also shows the importance of creative storytelling: the plot could have worked in a conventional, linear fashion but it was the way it's told that got it recognised and applauded across the board. After having excelled on two thrillers by the age of 30, Nolan was trusted to direct his first major-budget film, Insomnia. Adapted from a Norwegian film of the same name, the plot, like Memento, is centred around a man's state-of-mind and the problems it presents, which Nolan portrays once again with genuine depth and insight. Al Pacino plays a police detective who, with his partner, has been sent from Los Angeles to Alaska, to investigate a homicide case with the local police. The nature of the location ends up giving Pacino's character as much trouble as the case, and the plot thickens as the problems of both elements persist, with no shortage of complications. As the story develops, Nolan photographs the setting in a way that depicts its beauty and its danger, as well as twisting the investigation and the characters, rethinking rather than retelling the original story, making it an appropriate and worthwhile remake. Nolan's early work is formidable - Memento and Insomnia are considered two of the best thrillers of their decade - but his drive to push himself and constantly scale up led to something much more ambitious for his next work; not only a nine-figure budget but a step into the unknown, and an attempt to revive and revamp a franchise that had been dormant for almost a decade. Nolan’s vision of Batman turned Gotham City into a real place- one of the biggest aesthetic changes was moving Gotham from art deco New York to the glass skyscrapers of Chicago, bringing the Bruce Wayne story into a 21st century environment. He changed the characters, too: for the first time we saw Bruce Wayne's parents, the root of his fear of bats and the disturbingly realistic motives and methods of his transformation into a people's protector. We also took a step into Gotham's grimy underworld, meeting antagonists who rather than mutant super-villains were corrupt officials and organised criminals, giving the film an unprecedented realism that made Batman's role all the more important. The film, admirably, focuses mainly on the development of its characters, but when the action starts it doesn't disappoint, directed with dedication and flair from the dynamic Nolan, who refuses a second-unit, preferring to direct all the action himself. It was also a breath of fresh air to see a modern film using practical effects as much as possible, rather than CGI: Nolan insisted on having a real Batcave built, complete with real waterfall, and renting an airship hangar on which to build sections of the slums and Gotham monorail. Nolan's attention to all of those details are what have made Batman Begins a landmark film, which changed its director's career as dramatically as it changed the future of the superhero film. After completing Begins Nolan very quickly went straight to work on his next project, something altogether more tricky and mysterious, The Prestige, a dark thriller about the rivalry between two top magicians in 19th century London who, fuelled by obsession and jealousy, begin to take their art to the extreme; in their work as well as their lives they stay in fierce competition, gradually abandoning their morals as they sacrifice more to attempt "real" magic. From the first scene to the very last frame there's always more going on than you may first think, with the mystery as complicated as the characters, and endless twists and turns as the plot continues to unravel. "Are you watching closely?" is an appropriate first line of dialogue, as is the last. While many of his generation have become endorsers of the digital age, Nolan has always taken a firm stance in the opposite camp. Like his predecessors and many of his elders he still believes in the magic of the flicker and the superior quality of printed film, so much that rather than resort to the much cheaper and easier digital for the high resolution and effects required for his next three films, he made them some of the very few modern films to be shot, at least partially, on 65mm film, and 70mm IMAX. The first of those was the unforgettable second instalment of the Batman trilogy, The Dark Knight. As well as keeping the realism of Begins this film continued to avoid the superhero cliché, turning instead into one of the darkest and most exciting crime films of this century in its own right. The deviation from using "Batman" in the title was a brave move but it said it all: The Dark Knight isn't about comic book capers: our Joker is an insane, murderous terrorist. The Scarecrow, who we also met in Begins, is a deranged psychiatrist. Two-Face is a deformed maniac. Batman is a flawed hero, a vigilante with a troubled past, who we now recognise is putting himself in grave danger every time he tries to do the right thing, and the battle between valiant good and merciless evil becomes a moral conundrum, rather than a matter of the good guy kicking ass. The film is also a technical marvel, with the rich sound and clinical resolution of the IMAX format prominent when used, and even bigger-scale practical effects, not least the destruction of a hospital, and hugely ambitious camera working all the way through the electrifying action. Game-changingly ambitious and universally popular, The Dark Knight's reception was as positive as the hype; and it's already standing the test of time as one of the iconic films of its era. Nolan’s films are known for intricate plots and complicated characters but none more prominently than Inception, his first foray into science fiction, in which a crew of criminals skilled in extracting thoughts from peoples dreams attempt, for the first time, to do the opposite, and plant an idea in someone's mind. The mission is dangerous but the troubled lead character's motive is so strong that he leads his crew into action, with endless complications. At its root it's a supreme example of cinematic storytelling on a massive scale, using many unique narrative techniques including explaining concepts through experience rather than dialogue, and changing speeds to represent the different layers of consciousness and varying time frames of events that are happening simultaneously. Some viewers got lost in its plot but it's just as easy to get lost in the technical side of the film; the sound, clinical editing and, of course, the epic, mind-bending cinematography: A film as grand and elaborate as Inception requires attention to detail from its writer and a strong narrative leadership from its director so that the audience is both enlightened and compelled. Christopher Nolan manages both in a way that makes Inception thrilling entertainment, as well as working on a deeper emotional level, and arriving at a satisfying conclusion. After Inception there was a great buzz all over the world in anticipation of Nolan's return to Gotham City, and eventually, in Summer 2012, came his completion of the trilogy with the darkest and perhaps bravest of his Batman films, The Dark Knight Rises, which as well as putting Batman up against his most brutal nemesis, with the stakes even higher than previously, brought the Dark Knight's story to a definitive climax. The film is told on a much more personal level than The Dark Knight, for the large part portraying Bruce Wayne as deeply and sympathetically as in Batman Begins, presenting his personal struggles after the events in the previous film, before returning as Batman to face Gotham's biggest threat yet, putting his heroism to the ultimate test. On top of the action the film does everything expected of a finale, drawing to a fitting conclusion of the enigmatic careers of both Wayne and Batman, and finalising the trilogy that changed the landscape of its genre. His work comes back to our screens in November with his ninth feature film, Interstellar, which promises to be a spectacle. At 43 and 9 months Nolan is the youngest man on this list but he's already one of the defining directors of the current age of cinema. His visual range and imagination are extraordinary, as is his rare ability to consistently thrill his audience as well as immerse them in the films' atmosphere and tell the story through the characters so intricately and intensely that they not only demand repeat viewings but actually improve on re-watch. Handling remakes and franchises as well as his own original ideas, he has proven himself as a writer-director from all sources of material in an ever-increasing range of settings and situations. Still a young director, he's already given us eight wonderful films and he's just getting started: the future is still bright for Christopher Nolan, and the possibilities are infinite.
    1 point
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